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WATCH A SPECIAL PREVIEW OF ALLEGIANCE!




WATCH HIGHLIGHTS OF THE SONGS FROM ALLEGIANCE!




WATCH BROADWAY.COM AND BROADWAY WORLD INTERVIEWS WITH GEORGE TAKEI, LEA SALONGA AND TELLY LEUNG






WATCH THE KPBS INTERVIEW WITH THE STARS AND CREATORS OF ALLEGIANCE




GOOD PEOPLE HAS AN EVEN BETTER OPENING

(10/8/12) • The cast and creative team of Good People was feeling very good indeed at their opening night party on Thursday, Oct. 4. They joined family, friends and Globe staff members to celebrate the show's opening, and some of the cast of Allegiance – A New American Musical stopped by offer their congratulations as well. A good time was had by all!

To see more photos of the opening night party, check out our Facebook page!


(from left) Cast member James McMenamin, stage manager Alison Cote, cast members Robin Pearson Rose, R. Ward Duffy, Eva Kaminsky and Carol Halstead, director Paul Mullins and cast member Nedra McClyde.


The Old Globe Managing Director Michael G. Murphy
and Good People director Paul Mullins.


Eva Kaminsky.


(from left) The Old Globe Board Chair Hal Fuson and wife Pam Fuson with cast member R. Ward Duffy.


(from left) Carol Halstead, Eva Kaminsky and Robin Pearson Rose.


R. Ward Duffy and Nedra McClyde.
(Photos by Jeffrey Weiser.)


VOICES THAT TELL THE STORY: Setting the Stage through Dialect

(10/3/12) • When the lights come up on The Old Globe's production of Good People, audience members are transported from the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre to an alley in South Boston, Massachusetts. The details of that neighborhood and the people who live there are essential to the play. To bring Good People to the stage, the artists involved must create a strong sense of place.

Bringing Southie to life is the job of the entire creative team. Visually, scenic designer Michael Schweikardt, costume designer Denitsa Bliznakova and lighting designer Chris Rynne create an immediate impression. The work of sound designer Fitz Patton helps establish the mood. But when the actors begin to speak, it's up to voice and dialect coach Jan Gist to help them evoke South Boston for the audience's ears.

For her work on Good People, Gist began by gathering extensive audio recordings of real Southie natives. Then she created a list of typical vocal sounds that characterize the Southie dialect, along with practice sentences to allow the actors to drill each sound (like "Margie argued at the party about Harvard and Old Harbor").

"My work in the theatre is similar to scenic design and costume design," says Gist. "I'm there to help tell the story the way it needs to be told. It doesn't do anybody any good if the speech is as authentic as hell but nobody can understand it. Or if it's authentic but the audience doesn't believe it. What makes a successful dialect on stage is that it is believable, understandable, consistent and tells the story."

In Good People, that story is about struggling, working-class people living paycheck to paycheck, most of whom have lived in the same neighborhood for their entire lives. "The Southie dialect has a roughness to it," Gist says. "In Southie — and this is true of a lot of densely populated cities and people who have to fight to survive — the fight is in their speech. There's a push and a shove, a kind of punch to the sound. That's one direction it can go. It can also go into a mumble, a kind of hiding, where the person's speech says, 'I dare you to understand me.' That can be problematic for an audience in a theatre."

Good People also explores class distinctions, especially through the character of Michael Dillon, a Southie native who escaped the struggles of his upbringing and is now working as a successful Boston doctor. For Gist, that character offers particular challenges. "The character might have certain sounds he uses when talking to his wife," she says, "but other sounds he uses with people from his old neighborhood. Voice people call that 'code-switching' — so Southies with other Southies might talk one way, but Southies with people from outside the neighborhood might talk differently."

For the residents of South Boston, a Southie dialect is not just an indicator of where they come from — it can even be a badge of honor. Gist explains: "As people travel more regularly, dialects in English are vanishing, except for those people who are left isolated in their own particular regions. Not only are they geographically left in those places, but they emotionally identify with them. So, consciously or unconsciously, they remain sounding native to those places. That, I think, is part of Southie. There is a pride not only in being from Boston but being from this neighborhood and surviving it."

—Danielle Mages Amato

For more information on Good People, click here, and to view more photos of the cast and creative team, visit our Facebook page!

(Top photo: Jan Gist (right) working with Good People actress Eva Kaminsky. Photo by Jeffrey Weiser.)



CRITICS ARE SINGING THE PRAISES OF ALLEGIANCE!

(10/1/12) • Audiences and critics are moved and delighted by the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, an epic tale of family and loyalty during World War II. The musical just extended through Oct. 28, so don't miss your chance to see what everyone is talking about!

CRITIC’S CHOICE!
“An affecting success! The Old Globe's smart, soulful world premiere musical shines.
It finds just the right balance of lyricism, heartbreak, yearning and, yes, humor.”
-U-T San Diego

CRITIC’S CHOICE!
“Moving and thought-provoking. Jay Kuo's score is refreshingly different,
with unusual and sweeping Asian-inspired melodies,
all lushly orchestrated and arranged by Lynne Shankel.”
-North County Times

“WOW!
An extraordinary world premiere musical that educates, moves, and entertains,
particularly as performed by a stellar cast under the inspired direction of Stafford Arima.”
-Stage Scene LA

To view additional photos from Allegiance, visit our Facebook page!


Lea Salonga as Kei Kimura and George Takei as Ojii-san.


Michael K. Lee as Frankie Suzuki (center) with (from left) Kay Trinidad, MaryAnn Hu, Ann Sanders and Katie Boren.


The cast of the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, with music and lyrics by Jay Kuo and book by Marc Acito, Kuo and Lorenzo Thione, directed by Stafford Arima, Sept. 7 - Oct. 28, 2012 at The Old Globe. Photos by Henry DiRocco.


Lea Salonga as Kei Kimura and Telly Leung as Sammy Kimura.


Allie Trimm as Hannah Campbell and
Telly Leung as Sammy Kimura.


ALLEGIANCE EXTENDS FOR ONE WEEK!

(9/28/12) • The Old Globe's World Premiere production of Allegiance – A New American Musical will receive an additional week of performances and will now run through Oct. 28. Audiences will have five more chances to see this epic musicals starring George Takei, Lea Salonga and Telly Leung.

Tickets are now on sale for the extension and can be purchased by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park or by clicking here.

To view more photos and videos of Allegiance, visit our Facebook page!


Telly Leung as Sammy Kimura and Lea Salonga as Kei Kimura
in the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical. Photo by Henry DiRocco.


A "STAR TREK" REUNION AT THE GLOBE

(9/27/12) • Beam them up, Scotty! Leonard Nimoy, best known as Spock from the original "Star Trek" series, joined up with his space exploring costar George Takei following a recent performance of Allegiance – A New American Musical at the Globe. George, who stars in the world premiere musical, met Leonard in the theatre's green room after the show to reminisce and take photos with the rest of the Allegiance cast.

To see more photos of the reunion, check out our Facebook page!


George Takei and Leonard Nimoy backstage at Allegiance.


George Takei, Leonard Nimoy and Lea Salonga.
(Photos by Jeffrey Weiser.)


HEADING OUT FOR ALLEGIANCE

(9/27/12) • Gay and lesbian theatre lovers and their friends met up at the Globe on Oct. 20 for OUT at the Globe, a pre-show event in Hattox Hall for the whole LGBT community. Food, drinks, raffle prizes and music from DJ John Joseph preceded a performance of Allegiance – A New American Musical in the Old Globe Theatre. Three more OUT events are scheduled for this season: Jan. 24, March 14 and May 9, and everyone is welcome to attend.

For more information and to buy tickets to this special event, click here, and to see more photos, check out our Facebook page!

(Photos by Jeffrey Weiser.)














THE WOMEN BEHIND THE WORK

(9/27/12) • In conjunction with Allegiance – A New American Musical, The Old Globe is presenting two special exhibits about the Japanese American internment: "The Tag Project," an art installation in the lobby of the Old Globe Theatre featuring thousands of replica ID tags similar to those worn by internees, and "Allegiance: A San Diego Perspective," a museum exhibit that explores how the internment affected San Diegans during World War II. The Globe hosted a reception for the opening of "Allegiance: A San Diego Perspective," and among those who attended was Linda A. Canada, President of the Japanese American Historical Society of San Diego, with whom the Globe partnered to make the exhibit possible. Guests were also joined by Wendy Maruyama, the artist who created "The Tag Project."

These exhibits are open to the public during the run of Allegiance. For more information about them and when to see them, click here, and to see more photos, check out our Facebook page!


Managing Director Michael G. Murphy, artist Wendy Maruyama and Japanese American Historical Society of San Diego President Linda A. Canada.


Artist Wendy Maruyama and Jane Ottenstein.
(Photos by Jeffrey Weiser.)


THE LANDSCAPE OF INTERNMENT
Scenic designer Donyale Werle on creating the set for Allegiance

(9/26/12) • Could you tell us about some of the research you did to prepare for this design?

A lot of my research came from very real, specific details of the internment camps. I started this project a year and a half ago by visiting the Japanese American National Museum where I got to see a barrack and view photographs and artifacts. It really gives you the sense of this great Japanese American story. I only knew some of the history before that. When I lived in California, I had learned about the internment camps, but I didn’t really get the depth of it and how much it impacted people’s lives for generations to come — and still impacts them today.

Some of my research came from Wyoming itself. My husband’s family is from Wyoming, so I’m familiar with the landscape and the feeling of what it’s like out there. The landscape is a big part of our design. I also looked at shoji screens, Japanese architecture and sculptures that work with wood and paper, origami and the idea of layering paper. We also referenced a beautiful picture of a tree with a cross section of the roots below. This image resonated a lot with the themes of the show; family, roots, heritage, hidden layers, deeper meanings. There is quietness and strength to this image.

Were there specific textures, colors or shapes that you took from your research to create the set?

The whole set is comprised of very natural materials. There’s a lot of wood, a lot of fabric. There’s a layering of squares and rectangles to create almost a patchwork quilt, made not with many different colors but with neutrals — very much like the Wyoming landscape, which is dry and dusty with beautiful golden hues and sagey greens and warm browns. You don’t necessarily think about Japan alongside the desert, but we’re trying to combine the sensibilities of both locations into a poetic landscape.

What were some of the challenging things that the show required the set to do?

There are around 50 scenes in the show. So how do you take a conceptual, non-realistic set and make it change to reflect specific locations? That has been a challenge. The set includes large panels that pivot, track and move around the space to shift your perspective. They serve as projection surfaces and help us transform the space.

How did you develop an interest in using reclaimed and salvaged material in your work?

I’ve always been inspired by my father, who was involved in solar energy and worked with salvaged materials in landscape and playground design. The light bulb moment occurred for me after working as an associate for the show High Fidelity on Broadway. We worked on the show for 13 months, and it closed after 13 performances and the whole set went into the trash. I couldn’t continue working that way. So I started building sets from reclaimed materials to use some of the waste I was seeing around me. With every show I try to reuse materials, and it’s not hard—there’s so much out there. For this show, it’s primarily reclaimed wood. We have wood from an old fence that someone was ripping down, pallet wood, old scaffolding boards, wood from previous Globe shows. The other materials are purchased new but are sustainable products. I try to avoid materials such as foam and plastic, unless they are salvaged from other sources.

Using salvaged materials seems to have a particular resonance for this show, as the internees themselves made extraordinary things from reclaimed and salvaged materials they found in the camps.

This show is a lot about contrasts. There’s a light, airy openness, and then there’s this oppressive wooden barrier. The internees are in an open landscape, but they’re being very contained behind barbed wire. Everything about their lives is controlled and managed and yet, they’ve been able to create a life for themselves within this harsh environment. That’s an important aspect of Allegiance, to show the spirit of the Japanese Americans and their ability to survive and grow.

For more information on the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, click here.

(Top photo: Donyale Werle's set model of Allegiance. Photo by Jeffrey Weiser. Bottom photo: Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Heart Mountain, Wyoming. Photo courtesy of Mitch Homma, Michihiko "Mike" Wada and Honey Wada.)



A FIRST PEEK AT GOOD PEOPLE

(9/25/12) • The cast and creative team of Good People recently gathered for a presentation of the production's design elements. Director Paul Mullins, scenic designer Michael Schweikardt and costume designer Denitsa Bliznakova showed off their models and sketches and discussed the ideas behind the overall production design. To see additional photos of the design presentation, visit our Facebook page!


(from left) Scenic designer Michael Schweikardt and director Paul Mullins.


Michael Schweikardt's set model.


Costume designer Denitsa Bliznakova.


Some of Denitsa Bliznakova's costume renderings.


MEET THE CAST AND DIRECTOR OF GOOD PEOPLE




JOIN US FOR SPECIAL EVENTS DURING THE RUN OF GOOD PEOPLE

(9/24/12) • The Old Globe will offer a lineup of educational seminars and forums associated with Good People, which begins performances on Sept. 29. David Lindsay-Abaire's award-winning play about class divisions in modern-day Boston is making its San Diego Premiere and plays until Oct. 28.

The Insights Seminar for Good People will take place on Monday, Oct. 1 in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre. This informal presentation offers ideas and insights to enhance the theatergoing experience and features a panel selected from the artistic company of the play.  Reception at 6:30 p.m., seminar at 7:00 p.m.  Admission is free and reservations are not required.

Post-Show Forums for Good People will take place on Tuesdays, Sept. 25 and Oct. 2, Wednesday, Oct. 10 and Saturday, Oct. 13 (matinee). Discuss the play with members of the cast and crew at post-show discussions led by the Globe's creative staff after the performances. Post-Show Forums are included in the ticket price to these performances of Good People.

To find out more about Good People, click here, and to view additional photos of the cast, visit our Facebook page!

(Photo: The cast of Good People: (from left) R. Ward Duffy, Carol Halstead, Eva Kaminsky, Robin Pearson Rose, Nedra McClyde and James McMenamin. Photo by Henry DiRocco.)


UNCOMMON PATRIOTISM: GEORGE TAKEI ON ALLEGIANCE

(9/24/12) • Long before he became an actor and cultural icon, George Takei was one of 120,000 Japanese Americans forced to leave their homes and enter internment camps. His family was first sent to Camp Rohwer in Arkansas, but when his parents answered "no" to questions 27 and 28 on the U.S. Government's Loyalty Questionnaire, they were labeled "disloyals" and sent to the Tule Lake Segregation Camp. In all, his family spent four years in the camps. Meeting George Takei and hearing his personal story inspired Allegiance creators Jay Kuo and Lorenzo Thione to bring the story of the Japanese American internment to the stage.

Raising awareness about the Japanese American internment has been an issue close to your heart for many years. What makes musical theatre a good vehicle for telling this story?

The forced imprisonment of citizens and legal immigrants simply because they looked like the enemy is something we understand intellectually as unjust. Drama, however, humanizes this still little-known and even less understood story. It connects us and touches our common humanity, and music touches our hearts. Musical theatre is a powerful medium for moving an audience, both through their minds and their emotions, to experience the anguish, heartbreak, joy and triumphs of a people.

What have been the joys and challenges of revisiting this part of your life—especially given your family history and the way it inspired the musical?

I was five years old when armed soldiers came and banged on the front door of our Los Angeles home and ordered us out. I remember my mother had tears rolling down her cheeks. The terror of that morning is indelibly seared into my memory. But as a child, I was able to adjust to the abnormality of imprisonment, and my real memories are of the fun times I had. It was not until I was a teenager studying about democracy and the U.S. Constitution that I had difficulties reconciling my childhood memories with our national ideals. I read books on the internment, talked to older internees and had long and intense discussions with my father. And I became an activist. I testified at the Congressional hearing on redress for the unjust wartime incarceration. I went on national speaking tours. It troubled me that so few knew about the internment and understood even less of its complexities.

So the great joy was in meeting Jay Kuo and Lorenzo Thione one evening in, of all prophetic places, a Broadway theatre. During a brief intermission conversation, I mentioned my childhood in an internment camp, and from that conversation sprang the idea of a musical on that dark chapter of American history.

There is a large military population in San Diego, where over 2,000 residents were sent to internment camps. Is Allegiance in some way a military story?

When Pearl Harbor was bombed, young Japanese American men and women, like all young Americans, rushed to recruitment centers to volunteer for service. This act of patriotism was answered with a slap in the face. They were denied service and labeled "enemy non-aliens." The insult of being categorized as "enemy" was compounded by the term "non-alien" — the government even stripped them of the word "citizen."

A year into imprisonment, the government realized there was a wartime manpower shortage in the military, and, as suddenly as they rounded up Japanese Americans, they opened up the U.S. Army to them. Thousands of those same Japanese Americans went from behind the barbed-wire fences to put on the same uniforms as that of the sentries that guarded over them. And they served with astonishing courage and heroism. When the war ended, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the all-Japanese American unit, returned from Europe as the most decorated unit of the entire war. Twenty-one vets of the 442nd were decorated with the Medal of Honor, the highest recognition the nation can grant. Theirs is a story of uncommon patriotism under extraordinary challenges.

In Allegiance, you play two characters from two very different generations: Sam Kimura and his grandfather, Ojii-san. Did different generations experience the internment differently? Do you think different generations will experience Allegiance differently?

There are distinct generational differences in the experience of the incarceration. The older generation was made up largely of immigrants from Japan who came to the U.S. around the turn of the century. As a group, they were denied naturalized U.S. citizenship. A good number spoke little English. They were culturally Japanese. Their children were born and educated as Americans. They were citizens by virtue of their birth, and most had never visited Japan. They were culturally Japanese American. The internment was the biggest force in fracturing the community generationally. Today, the generation that experienced the incarceration has been silent from a sense of shame and bad memories. They had been incarcerated under suspicion of being spies and traitors. They wanted to be as "American" as they possibly could and forget their disgraced past. Thus, their children have little knowledge of their relatives' internment experiences. Unlike other ethnic Americans, young Japanese Americans are possibly the one group most cut off from a connection to their ancestral heritage. Allegiance could be as eye-opening for younger Japanese Americans as it would be for the larger American audience today.

For more information on the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, click here.

(Top photo: (left) George Takei with his mother and siblings during their internment at Tule Lake; (top right) Takei's kindergarten photo taken at Camp Rohwer. Bottom photo: Takei at Camp Rohwer, the Arkansas internment camp where he and his family were imprisoned during World War II.)


A BRIEF LOOK AT MIKE MASAOKA

(9/24/12) • Mike Masaoka (1915-1991) was a prominent and controversial figure in the history of the Japanese American internment.

In 1941, at the age of 26, Masaoka was hired as the National Secretary and Field Executive of the Japanese American Citizens League, an organization founded in 1929 by and for Nisei (the first generation of Japanese Americans born in the United States). After the signing of Executive Order 9066, Masaoka testified before the U.S. House of Representatives, speaking out against the evacuation and internment of Japanese Americans, but also stating, "I think that we will be called upon to make greater sacrifices than any others. But I think sincerely, if the military say 'Move Out,' we will be glad to move, because we recognize that even behind evacuation there is not just national security but also a thought as to our own welfare and security."

Masaoka felt that the Japanese American community should work to prove their loyalty and demonstrate their patriotism. In the hopes of avoiding internment, he even proposed that they be allowed to serve in all-Nisei "suicide battalions," which would take on highly dangerous missions, their loyalty guaranteed by the soldiers' families and friends, who would offer themselves as "hostages."

When it became clear that the U.S. military was moving forward with internment, Masaoka and the JACL advocated for Japanese Americans to cooperate fully. The War Relocation Authority was formed to oversee the internment, and Masaoka and other JACL members served on its advisory council, representing the internees. Masaoka recommended camp policies that promoted the assimilation and Americanization of internees, in order to "eliminate those mannerisms and thoughts which mark us apart, aside from our physical characteristics." He wrote, "We hope for a one hundred percent American community."

In 1943, when the U.S. Army decided to form a Japanese American unit, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Masaoka was its first volunteer. He and four of his brothers served in the 442nd. When the draft was instated for Japanese Americans in the internment camps, the JACL spoke out strongly against those who resisted. (In 2002, the JACL formally apologized for taking this position.)

After the war, Masaoka became a lobbyist in Washington, DC, working on civil rights issues. He was active in supporting the Japanese American Evacuation Claims Act of 1948, which authorized government compensation of internees' financial losses. He was also a major proponent of the McCarran-Walter Act, allowing the Issei (Japanese-born immigrants) to become naturalized citizens for the first time. He was active in the larger Civil Rights Movement, participating in the 1963 March on Washington and in the formation of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights.

Masaoka's actions before and during the internment earned him both passionate supporters and bitter detractors. Throughout his life, he always maintained that he had acted in what he felt to be the best interests of the Japanese American community. In his 1987 autobiography, They Call Me Moses Masaoka, he wrote: "Under the circumstances that existed in 1942—and it is important not to judge long-past decisions by contemporary values—I could not have done otherwise."

—Danielle Mages Amato

For more information on the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, click here.

(Top photo: Mike Masaoka at work in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team's public information office in southern France. Bottom photo: Four of the five Masaoka brothers who served in the U.S. Army: Ben, killed in action; Mike; Tad, wounded; and Ike, completely disabled. Hank (not pictured), volunteered for the 442nd but transferred to the paratroops.)


ALLEGIANCE CELEBRATES OPENING NIGHT ON THE RED CARPET

(9/20/12) • The cast and creative team of the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical celebrated the show's opening night on Wednesday, Sept. 19 with a bash at The Prado in Balboa Park, and some of them stopped by the red carpet for photos. George Takei reunited with his "Star Trek" costar Walter Koenig, and Telly Leung met up with his Godspell on Broadway costars Hunter Parrish and Anna Maria Perez de Tagle. To see additional photos of Allegiance opening night, visit our Facebook page!


Director Stafford Arima (right) with George Takei, Telly Leung
and Lea Salonga.


George Takei reunites with his "Star Trek" costar Walter Koenig.


Telly Leung reunites with his costars from Godspell on Broadway,
Anna Maria Perez de Tagle and Hunter Parrish.


Allegiance creators Lorenzo Thione, Jay Kuo and Marc Acito.


Paolo Montalban.


(from left) Cast members Geno Carr, Brandon Joel Maier, Jill Townsend and Kürt Norby. (Photos by Doug Gates.)


LOYALTY AND PATRIOTISM BEHIND BARBED WIRE
A San Diego Perspective
by Susan Hasegawa

(9/17/12) • On April 7, 1942, the downtown San Diego Santa Fe Depot overflowed with Japanese American families. Under the watchful eyes of armed military guards 21-year-old Tetsuzo "Tets" Hirasaki and 1,150 other San Diegans were ordered from their homes and into the custody of the United States government. Tets could only take what he could carry. The FBI had already picked up Tets' father, Chiyomatsu Hirasaki, and his whereabouts were unknown to the family. Tets gamely smiled for the camera and promised to keep in touch with friends in San Diego. This scene would be repeated in numerous communities as the U.S. government forcibly removed approximately 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry from the West Coast into American concentration camps1. The surprise Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the U.S. entrance into World War II had widespread ramifications for the local Japanese American community.

Several months earlier, on February 19, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. It delegated power to the Secretary of War and military commanders to take necessary actions to secure the West Coast from Japanese attack. Gripped by war hysteria and racial prejudice, military leaders, journalists and politicians voiced fears of sabotage and spying by the local Japanese American community. "Military necessity" was the justification for the removal of all people of Japanese ancestry from the exclusion zone encompassing the coastal areas of Washington and Oregon, the entire state of California and the southern border areas of Arizona. The government built 10 camps in desolate inland areas. Spartan tarpaper barracks, communal dining halls and public toilet facilities were all part of camp life for the duration of the war. The camps had armed military guards and barbed-wire fences to keep inmates confined. There were no cases of espionage or wrongdoing. The only crime of the Issei (Japanese immigrant or first generation) and their American citizen Nisei (second-generation) children: looking like the enemy.

As an American citizen, Tets had grown up learning about the American system of government and the Bill of Rights; during World War II, however, Tets' faith in the U.S. would be sorely tested. Tets was assigned a horse stable in a temporary detention center at Santa Anita Race Track for several months and found a job as a messenger. Tets writes of an inmate strike in response to searches and seizures for contraband: "Then also with the strike came the ban on meetings of any sort. Discussion of the present war — city, county, states, national politics and the present administration — was taboo. Then too, was the ban on Japanese literature, later came the ban on Japanese phonograph records. Where was the democracy — freedom of speech, etc.? Would a Caucasian U.S. citizen take such shoving around?"

Tets spent the remainder of the war in the Colorado River Relocation Center, commonly called Poston. He worked in the mess hall and, before starting his early morning shifts, watched the sunrise over "purple mountains" in an otherwise "drab" landscape. He wrote numerous letters to friends in San Diego describing the triple-digit summer heat and the winter desert weather: "The dust storm came during the third week of January and lasted for three days...we had the coldest morning yet when the temperature dropped to 20 degrees. That whole day ice was on the ground. Then it began to rain. It poured cloudburst after cloudburst for three days. The dust just turned into the stickiest mud I have ever seen." For protection against the elements, Tets stuffed newspapers into wooden barrack wall cracks and pounded the tops of canned food containers over holes in the floorboards.

With a population reaching almost 18,000, Poston instantly became the third largest city in the state of Arizona in 1942. Poston was also one of two camps located on Indian reservations. In camp, internees could obtain jobs paying $12 to $16 a month for a laborer and $19 a month for a skilled professional. Camp administrators scrambled to open schools, but due to initial furniture shortages, children brought their own chairs for daily lessons. Sports leagues, including softball and basketball, became very popular to break up the monotony of camp life. In the dry desert environment, internees created paper flowers to commemorate funerals and to celebrate weddings.

Ironically, the same individuals whose loyalties were questioned while living in the exclusion zone were then deemed appropriate to work in interior states and serve in the military. In 1943, camp internees could take a loyalty oath, complete an extensive personal history application, find a job outside of the exclusion area and leave camp. Young men were also reinstated for the draft. The loyalty questionnaire and the drafting of Nisei proved extremely controversial and sparked protests in different camps.

Tets on the other hand, writes of the eagerness of Nisei men to prove their patriotism: "When the Army came here to [Poston] Camp III to register the men under selective service and also to take volunteers for the Japanese American combat unit, it was the best piece of news we Nisei have had in a long time. We Nisei were despairing on ever becoming recognized. But now we have the chance to prove our loyalty, because after the evacuation, Nisei were classed as aliens ineligible for military service." Tets was one of the first San Diegans to volunteer; however, a shoulder injury disqualified him from military service. Even as Tets sought to prove his loyalty through military service, his father remained in a segregated Department of Justice camp.

Comprised of volunteers and draftees, the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team became a formidable fighting force in the European theatre and was one of the most highly decorated combat units for its size and duration of service in the history of the U.S. military. Nisei and Kibei (Nisei educated in Japan who returned to the United States before Pearl Harbor) with Japanese language skills were recruited for Military Intelligence Service and were secretly deployed in the Pacific theatre.

With exclusion from the West Coast lifted starting in January 1945, internees had to decide on whether to return to San Diego or plant roots in other cities. Since the San Diego City Council had passed resolutions against the return of Japanese Americans to the region and the District Attorney had filed Alien Land Law suits against several Issei farmers, detainees faced an uncertain future in San Diego.

When the government closed Poston in late 1945, over 900 people returned to San Diego, including Tets and his family. Internees leaving camps received $25, war ration coupon books and a one-way ticket to their destination. Arriving in San Diego, families faced a severe housing shortage and wary employers. Devastated by the economic and psychological upheaval of incarceration, many Issei never recovered, but the rebuilding of the Japanese American community in San Diego had already commenced.

For more information on the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, click here.

(Top photo: Kathy Tasaki and Tets Hirasaki at the Santa Fe Depot, April 7, 1942. Photo courtesy of the Japanese American Historical Society of San Diego. Bottom photo: Living quarters at Poston War Relocation Center, June 1, 1942. Photo by Fred Clark, courtesy of National Archives.)


CHECK OUT THE FIRST PRODUCTION PHOTOS OF ALLEGIANCE

(9/10/12) • Previews for the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical have begun at the Globe and audiences are already excited about this new production, which stars film and television icon George Takei, Tony Award winner Lea Salonga and Broadway favorite Telly Leung. Take a look below to see some photos of the show, and visit our Facebook page to see more!


(from left) Lea Salonga as Kei Kimura, Telly Leung as Sammy Kimura, George Takei as Ojii-san and Paul Nakauchi as Tatsuo Kimura.


George Takei as Ojii-san.


Michael K. Lee as Frankie Suzuki and Lea Salonga as Kei Kimura.


Allie Trimm as Hannah Campbell and Telly Leung as Sammy Kimura.


Paolo Montalban as Mike Masaoka.


Telly Leung as Sammy Kimura (center) with (from left) Jon Jon Briones, Scott Watanabe, Karl Josef Co and Marc de la Cruz.
Photos by Henry DiRocco.


WATCH A BEHIND-THE-SCENES VIDEO FEATURING AN EXCLUSIVE SONG FROM ALLEGIANCE!




MEET THE CAST AND CREATIVE TEAM OF ALLEGIANCE




WATCH A SNEAK PEEK OF AS YOU LIKE IT, RICHARD III AND
INHERIT THE WIND




To view more highlights of the 2012 Shakespeare Festival, visit our YouTube page!

GRINCH TICKETS NOW ON SALE!

(9/7/12) • Single tickets for Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! are now on sale online by clicking here.  The annual holiday musical, directed by James Vásquez with book and lyrics by Timothy Mason and music by Mel Marvin, will run on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center, November 17 – December 29.  Ticket prices range from $37 to $87 for adults and from $24 to $82 for children.  Tickets can also be purchased by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office beginning at 12:00 noon on Sunday, Sept. 9.

Steve Blanchard will reprise his role as The Grinch, which he played last year in his Globe debut.  Blanchard has appeared on Broadway in Beauty and the Beast, Camelot, The Three Musketeers and A Christmas Carol and can be heard on the original recordings of Johnny Guitar, Sundown, Frankenstein and Northbound Train.

The Old Globe will offer an autism-friendly performance of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! on Saturday, Dec. 15 at 10:30 a.m.  Following in the footsteps of successful autism-friendly performances of The Lion King and Mary Poppins on Broadway, The Grinch will be performed in a friendly and supportive environment for children on the autism spectrum and their families.  Slight adjustments will be made to the production including fewer loud noises and flashing lights that may be challenging for some audience members.  Additional features will also help make the experience safer and more enjoyable for children with autism and other sensitivity issues, including a pre-show visit to the Globe to familiarize children with the theatre; an online social story available to view and print at home that will outline in words and pictures the experience of a visit to the Globe; a quiet area in the lobby of the theatre; and on-site volunteers to assist families as needed.  Theatre Development Fund’s (TDF) Autism Theatre Initiative serves as an advisor for The Old Globe’s autism-friendly Grinch performance (www.tdf.org/autism).

The seventh annual Globe Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony will take place on Sunday, Nov. 18 at 6:00 p.m. on the Globe’s Copley Plaza.  The ceremony will kick off the holiday season in conjunction with the presentation of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!  Designed by Grinch scenic designer John Lee Beatty, the unique tree will be located in the center of the Plaza and will remain for the run of the show.  This fun family event will feature a special live performance by members of the Grinch cast and a delightful holiday snowfall on the Globe Plaza.  Although the event is free, reservations are required.  Information on how to RSVP will be announced at a future date.

To view photos of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, visit our Facebook page!

(Photo: Caitlin McAuliffe as Cindy-Lou Who and Steve Blanchard as The Grinch in the 2011 production of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! Photo by Henry DiRocco.)


GOOD PEOPLE CAST AND CREATIVE TEAM ANNOUNCED

(9/6/12) • The Old Globe today announced the cast and creative team for the San Diego Premiere of Pulitzer Prize winner David Lindsay-Abaire’s Good People, the award-winning play about class divisions in modern-day Boston.  Directed by Paul Mullins, Good People will run Sept. 29 – Oct. 28, 2012 in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center.  Preview performances run Sept. 29 – Oct. 3. 

Eva Kaminsky makes her Globe debut as Margaret, a hard-luck single mother trying to scrape together a better life for herself and her daughter.  Kaminsky was recently in the Broadway company of The Lyons and has appeared Off Broadway in The Language Archive, Made in Poland, ‘Nami and The Safety Net

R. Ward Duffy plays Mike, a doctor who has escaped South Boston and is confronted with his upbringing when Margaret arrives on his doorstep.  Duffy most recently appeared in the world premiere adaptation of Anna Karenina at Portland Center Stage and performed in New York at Lincoln Center Theater, New Dramatists and Cherry Lane Theatre.

Old Globe Associate Artist Robin Pearson Rose appears as Dottie, Margaret’s foul-mouthed, bingo-playing landlady.  Rose has appeared at the Globe in August: Osage County, Vincent in Brixton, Da, All My Sons (San Diego Theatre Critics Circle Award), Voir Dire and Dancing at Lughnasa, Wonderful Tennessee and Remembrance.  She has also appeared on Broadway in Holiday and The Visit.

The cast also includes Carol Halstead as Jean, Nedra McClyde as Kate and James McMenamin as Stevie.  Halstead recently appeared in the Broadway production of Gore Vidal’s The Best Man and has been seen Off Broadway in The Duchess of Malfi, Pericles, Walking Down Broadway, Easter Candy, The Mask and The Amazing Adventures of Tense Guy.  McClyde is a member of The Ensemble Studio Theatre and received a 2011 New Dramatist Charles Bowden Actor Award for Miss Evers’ Boys at the Red Fern Theatre Company.  McMenamin was most recently seen in The Bad Guys directedbyHal Brooks at Second Stage Theatre.  His Off Broadway credits include Suicide, Incorporated at Roundabout Theatre Company, Middletown at Vineyard Theatre and David Cromer’s acclaimed staging of Our Town at Barrow Street Theatre. 

The creative team includes Michael Schweikardt (Scenic Design), Denitsa Bliznakova (Costume Design), Chris Rynne (Lighting Design), Fitz Patton (Sound Design), Jan Gist (Voice and Dialect Coach), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting) and Alison Cote (Stage Manager).

To view additional photos of the cast of Good People, visit our Facebook page!


Director Paul Mullins (center) with the cast of the San Diego premiere of : (from left) R. Ward Duffy, Carol Halstead, Eva Kaminsky, Robin Pearson Rose, Nedra McClyde and James McMenamin. David Lindsay-Abaire's Good People, directed by Mullins, runs Sept. 29 - Oct. 28, 2012 at The Old Globe. Photo by Henry DiRocco.


WELCOME, CLASS OF 2014!

Festival Set

(8/31/12) • The Old Globe and the University of San Diego welcomed seven new students into the prestigious Master of Fine Arts program at a reception on August 30. Above, new M.F.A. candidates (from left) Robbie Simpson, Erin Adams, Adam Gerber, Allison Layman, Kushtrim Hoxha, Meaghan Boeing and Stephen Hu stand with Director of Professional Training Richard Seer (far right). Welcome to the Globe family!

(Photo by Jeffrey Weiser.)


SAYING "THANK YOU" TO OUR DONORS

(8/27/12) • On August 16, The Old Globe said "thank you" to its Annual Fund donors with a special reception featuring members of the 2012 Shakespeare Festival. Donors mingled with the actors during a cocktail reception that was followed by the actors discussing their experiences with the Globe and thanking the donors for helping to make the Globe's productions possible. The actors then signed Festival posters for the donors to take home as a memento of the evening.

Additional photos of the Shakespeare Intensive performance are available on our Facebook page!














IN REHEARSAL WITH ALLEGIANCE

(8/25/12) • The cast and creative team of Allegiance – A New American Musical are hard at work in rehearsals for the show's world premiere production, which begins at the Globe on Sept. 7. George Takei, Lea Salonga, Telly Leung and the whole cast are rehearsing blocking, perfecting songs and incorporating new material in anticipation of the show's first preview. Props and set pieces also help transform the rehearsal hall into the world of Allegiance.

To view additional photos of Allegiance in rehearsal, visit our Facebook page!


(from left) George Takei, Paul Nakauchi, Telly Leung
and Lea Salonga.


Lea Salonga and Michael K. Lee.


Telly Leung and Lea Salonga (center) and the cast in rehearsal for Allegiance – A New American Musical at The Old Globe.
The World Premiere of Allegiance, with music and lyrics by Jay Kuo and book by Marc Acito, Kuo and Lorenzo Thione, directed by Stafford Arima, will run Sept. 7 - Oct. 21, 2012 at The Old Globe. Photos by Jeffrey Weiser.


(from left) Telly Leung and Paolo Montalban.


(from left) Jon Jon Briones, Scott Watanabe, Telly Leung, Karl Josef Co and Marc de la Cruz.


THE 2012 SHAKESPEARE INTENSIVE ROCKS OUT

(8/23/12) • The Old Globe's fifth annual Summer Shakespeare Intensive presented its culminating performance on Monday, August 13 with performances of 50-minute versions of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothingand A Midsummer Night's Dream. Besides being filled with the Bard's language, the productions featured guitar playing, vampires and even the "Thriller" dance. The 34 students in this year's Intensive played to a house full of friends and family and brought these two comedies to vivid life.

Additional photos of the Shakespeare Intensive performance are available on our Facebook page!














VISIT A FREE MUSEUM EXHIBIT RELATED TO ALLEGIANCE

(8/22/12) • The Old Globe will team with the Japanese American Historical Society of San Diego (JAHSSD) to present “Allegiance: A San Diego Perspective,” a museum exhibit about the Japanese American internment during World War II and how it affected San Diego County and its citizens. The exhibit, presented in conjunction with the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, will be located in the Museum of Man Annex adjacent to the Globe and will be open throughout the run of Allegiance from Sept. 7 – Oct. 21, 2012. The exhibit is free to the public and will be open two hours prior to each performance on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays; from noon to 8:00 p.m. on Saturdays; from noon to 7:00 p.m. on Sundays; and from noon to 7:00 p.m. on Tuesdays as part of Balboa Park’s Free Tuesdays.

“Allegiance: A San Diego Perspective” contains maps, photographs, artwork and artifacts from the thriving Japanese American community in San Diego before the war and traces the removal of San Diego’s Japanese Americans to internment camps in 1942. The exhibit, which includes artifacts that have been donated by local Japanese Americans, also features a scale model of an internment camp room and a variety of furniture and objects made by internees. In addition, the exhibit highlights the important contributions of Japanese immigrants and Japanese Americans to San Diego.

Additional photos of Allegiance and its related events and exhibits are available on our Facebook page!


World War II military uniform of Hideo Ochi, a resident of Chula Vista who was a member of the acclaimed 442nd Regimental Combat Team, an all-Japanese American group that was the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in the entire history of the U.S. military.


A photo of the extended Obayashi family of San Diego, which was sent to the Poston internment camp in 1942 and was one of the first to return to the city in 1945 and resume its family business.


This red carp was handmade by the family of Akira Shima; his mother made the fish from a bedsheet, and Shima, a former businessman in San Diego, hand-painted the design.
Photos courtesy of the Japanese American Historical Society of San Diego.


CREATING THE WORLD OF ALLEGIANCE

(8/21/12) • The cast and creative team of Allegiance – A New American Musical and the staff of the Globe came together on August 1, 2012 for a design presentation that explored the ideas and inspirations for the World Premiere musical. Director Stafford Arima, scenic designer Donyale Werle and costume designer Alejo Vietti presented their renderings and models, and George Takei, Lea Salonga and other members of the show's cast were on hand as well.

Additional photos of the Allegiance design presentation are available on our Facebook page!


Director Stafford Arima welcomes the cast, creative team and staff at the design presentation for Allegiance.


George Takei examines the design concepts and
inspirations for Allegiance.


Costume designer Alejo Vietti talks about his design concepts.


Alejo Vietti's costume designs for Allegiance.


Scenic designer Donyale Werle describes her designs.


Donyale Werle's set model for Allegiance.
(Photos by Jeffrey Weiser.)


JOIN US FOR SPECIAL EVENTS DURING THE RUN OF ALLEGIANCE

(8/16/12) • The Old Globe will offer several exciting seminars, exhibits and social events associated with the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, which begins performances on Sept. 7. The musical, about a family of Japanese Americans sent to an internment camp during World War II, stars television and film icon George Takei, Tony Award winner Lea Salonga and Broadway star Telly Leung.

A variety of supplemental seminars will explore the Japanese American internment and the creation of Allegiance.

  • INTERNMENT: THE SAN DIEGO EXPERIENCE – Monday, Sept. 10 at 7:00 p.m.
    Learn how the Japanese American internment affected San Diego County, where over 2,000 citizens were put into the camps, at this informative seminar. RSVPs are required for this free event. Email RSVP@theoldglobe.org to reserve a seat.
  • INSIGHTS SEMINAR: ALLEGIANCE – Monday, Sept. 17 at 7:00 p.m. (Reception at 6:30 p.m.)
    Members of the creative team discuss the history of the production and the issues they faced in the creation of Allegiance. No RSVP is necessary for this free event.
  • IN THEIR OWN WORDS: STORIES FROM FORMER INTERNEES – Monday, Oct. 15 at 7:00 p.m.
    Former internees share their unique, first-hand perspective of the historical events that take place in Allegiance. RSVPs are required for this free event. Email RSVP@theoldglobe.org to reserve a seat.

The Globe will present two exhibits during the run of Allegiance exploring the themes and events in the show.

  • "THE TAG PROJECT" – Theater Lobby Installation by Artist Wendy Maruyama
    Wendy Maruyama's "The Tag Project" features groupings of ID tags resembling those worn by Japanese Americans as they were sent to the internment camps. Approximately 11 feet tall and weighing more than 100 pounds, each grouping contains enough tags to represent every person in one of the 10 U.S. internment camps. This art exhibit will be available to Allegiance tickets holders 45 minutes prior to each performance, and the installation will also be included on the Globe's Behind the Scenes Tours, which are available to the public most Saturdays and Sundays.
  • ALLEGIANCE: A SAN DIEGO PERSPECTIVE” – Museum Exhibit
    The Old Globe and the Japanese American Historical Society of San Diego present a museum exhibit throughout the run of Allegiance about the history of Japanese Americans who lived in San Diego prior to World War II and their removal to the internment camps. The exhibit will contain photographs, artifacts and materials about the internment and how it affected San Diego County and its citizens. Located in the Museum of Man Annex directly adjacent to the Old Globe Theatre, the exhibit is free to the public and will be open two hours prior to each performance and from noon to curtain on Tuesdays.

Additional events taking place during the run of Allegiance include:

  • POST-SHOW FORUMS: ALLEGIANCE – Tuesdays, Sept. 25 and Oct. 2, Wednesday, Oct. 10 and Saturday, Oct. 13 (matinee)
    Discuss the play with members of the Allegiance cast and crew at post-show discussions led by the Globe's creative staff after the performances. Post-Show Forums are included in the ticket price to these performances of Allegiance.
  • OUT AT THE GLOBE – Thursday, Sept. 20 at 6:30 p.m.
    An evening for gay and lesbian theater lovers and the whole LGBT community, OUT at the Globe includes a hosted wine and martini bar, appetizers and door prizes. Everyone is welcome. $20 per person. RSVP at (619) 23-GLOBE.  (Tickets to Allegiance are sold separately.)

To find out more about Allegiance, click here, and to view additional photos of Salonga and the cast, visit our Facebook page!

(Photo: (from left) Allegiance stars George Takei, Lea Salonga and Telly Leung. Photo by Vincent Desro.)


GOD OF CARNAGE HAS THE CRITICS IN STITCHES!

(8/13/12) • Critics and audiences alike are singing the praises of God of Carnage, Yasmina Reza's hilarious play about parents behaving badly. This award-winning comedy is playing through Sept. 2 at the Globe and is a four-way prizefight you won't want to miss!

CRITIC’S CHOICE!
“A theatrical thrill ride you won't want to miss! A director and four actors are at the top of their games in a play of zinging, witty, fast-flying dialogue that will make you laugh.
-North County Times

“WILDLY ENTERTAINING!
A classy evening of middlebrow theatrical fun. The Globe production is in the good hands of Director Richard Seer and four crack actors.”
-U-T San Diego

“DELICIOUS FUN!
Funnier than the original Broadway production thanks to Richard Seer's superb direction.”
-KSDS Jazz 88.3

“SLICK, CONTEMPORARY ENTERTAINMENT!
More laughs per minute than any new play in a while.”
-Talkin’ Broadway

To view additional photos from God of Carnage, visit our Facebook page!


Caitlin Muelder as Annette Raleigh and
T. Ryder Smith as Alan Raleigh.


Lucas Caleb Rooney as Michael Novak and
Erika Rolfsrud as Veronica Novak.


(from left) Erika Rolfsrud as Veronica Novak, Caitlin Muelder as Annette Raleigh, T. Ryder Smith as Alan Raleigh and Lucas Caleb Rooney as Michael Novak in the San Diego Premiere of God of Carnage by Yasmina Reza, translated by Christopher Hampton and directed by Richard Seer, July 27 - Sept. 2, 2012 at The Old Globe. Photo by Henry DiRocco.


Erika Rolfsrud as Veronica Novak.


(from left) Caitlin Muelder as Annette Raleigh, T. Ryder Smith as Alan Raleigh, Lucas Caleb Rooney as Michael Novak and Erika Rolfsrud as Veronica Novak.


THE 2012 GLOBE GALA CELEBRATES "A NIGHT IN TUSCANY"

(8/10/12) • The Old Globe’s 2012 Gala, “A Night in Tuscany,” benefiting the theater’s artistic and educational activities, was held on Saturday, July 28 on the Globe’s historic campus in Balboa Park.  The event was co-chaired by Board members Pamela Cesak, Jo Ann Kilty and Vicki Zeiger.  Lead underwriters for the evening were Audrey Geisel, Darlene Shiley and Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner with many other guests making significant gifts.

The evening began with cocktails and a silent auction held in the beautiful Alcazar Garden, which was lush with sunflowers and white linens, evoking the gorgeous rustic charms of Tuscany. Following the reception, Gala guests entered the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Conrad Preybs Theatre Center, for an exclusive concert by Tony Award winner Lea Salonga, star of the Globe's World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical.  Known worldwide for her roles on Broadway in Miss Saigon and Les Misérables, as well as the singing voice of Princess Jasmine in Disney’s Aladdin and Fa Mulan in Mulan, Salonga thrilled the audience with a selection of her hits including “A Whole New World,” “On My Own” and “I’d Give My Life for You.” After the performance, guests exited the theater directly onto Copley Plaza, which was transformed by delicate candlelight into an enchanting evening in a Tuscan piazza.  An Italian-inspired sit-down dinner, catered by Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina, was followed by dancing to the energizing music of Impulse on the Copley Plaza dance floor.

Additional photos of the 2012 Globe Gala are available on our Facebook page!


(from left) Gala Co-Chairs Jo Ann Kilty, Pam Cesak and Vicki Zeiger with Managing Director Michael G. Murphy.
Photo by Bob Ross.


(from left) Richard Wright, Board Member Mary Beth Adderley and performer Lea Salonga. Photo by Doug Gates.


Karen Cohn and Board Member Don Cohn.
Photo by Doug Gates.


(from left) Rich and Gaby Sulpizio, Sheryl White and Board Member Harvey White. Photo by Bob Ross.


(from left) Globe Associate Artist Robert Foxworth, performer Lea Salonga and Board Members Conrad Prebys and Debra Turner.
Photo by Doug Gates.


(from left) Sue Waggener, Board Member Tony Thornley, Gillian Thornley and Steve McCracken. Photo by Doug Gates.


THE SUMMER SHAKESPEARE INTENSIVE TO CULMINATE WITH A PERFORMANCE ON MONDAY, AUGUST 13

(8/10/12) • The Old Globe’s fifth annual Summer Shakespeare Intensive will present its culminating performance on Monday, August 13 at 8:00 p.m. with performances of 50-minute versions of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing and A Midsummer Night’s Dream on the outdoor Lowell Davies Festival Theatre.

The four-week program is a unique opportunity for local high school actors and actresses to refine their skills as performers in a professional setting. Throughout the Intensive, the students had the chance to study classical theatre technique, voice, movement and stage combat while observing the productions of the Globe’s Shakespeare Festival, which runs concurrently with the program. Festival company members lent the students insights into the art of performing Shakespeare that they will apply to their own performances of the Bard’s work.

Tickets to Much Ado About Nothing and A Midsummer Night’s Dream are available by calling the Box Office at (619) 234-5623. To view additional photos of the Summer Shakespeare Intensive, visit our Facebook page!









The high school participants of the 2012 Summer Shakespeare Intensive prepare for their culminating performances of
Much Ado About Nothing
and A Midsummer Night's Dream. Photos by Jeffrey Weiser.


THE CAST OF ALLEGIANCE GOES OUT AT THE GLOBE

(8/10/12) • Cast members from the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical joined other Old Globe patrons on August 9 for OUT at the Globe, our signature event for LGBT theatre lovers and their friends. Allegiance star George Takei was on hand for the event and joined in for the food, drinks and music. After the event, patrons headed into our theatres to catch performances of God of Carnage and Richard III.

The next OUT at the Globe will coincide with Allegiance and As You Like It on September 20. Reserve your spot by calling our Box Office at (619) 234-5623.

To view additional photos of OUT at the Globe, visit our Facebook page!






Gay and Lesbian theatre lovers and friends were "OUT at the Globe" with special guests George Takei and the cast of the upcoming World Premiere musical Allegiance - A New American Musical on Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012. Photos by Jeffrey Weiser.






LEA SALONGA TO SING THE NATIONAL ANTHEM AT THE PADRES GAME

(8/7/12) • Lea Salonga, star of the Globe's World Premiere production of Allegiance – A New American Musical, will sing the national anthem at the San Diego Padres game on Friday, August 17 against the San Francisco Giants. Lea will sing as part of the Padres' Filipino Cultural Night, a celebration featuring entertainment and give-aways that will begin at 5:05 p.m., prior to the 7:05 p.m. game time.

Lea is known worldwide for originating the role of Kim in the West End and Broadway productions of Miss Saigon, winning the Tony and Olivier Awards, among others.  She was the first Asian to play Eponine in Les Misérables on Broadway and was the singing voice of Princess Jasmine in Aladdin and Fa Mulan in Mulan and Mulan II.

To purchase tickets to the Padres game and the Filipino Cultural Night, go to padres.com/promo and enter code PINOY.

To find out more about Allegiance, click here, and to view additional photos of Salonga and the cast, visit our Facebook page!

(Photo: Allegiance star Lea Salonga. Photo courtesy of The Old Globe.)


WATCH ROBERT FOXWORTH AND RALPH FUNICELLO DISCUSS INHERIT THE WIND ON KPBS




ALLEGIANCE CAST AND CREATIVE TEAM ANNOUNCED

(8/3/12) • The Old Globe today announced the complete cast and creative team for the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, an epic story of family, love and patriotism set during the Japanese American internment of World War II.  Directed by Stafford Arima, with music and lyrics by Jay Kuo and book by Marc Acito, Kuo and Lorenzo Thione, the production features choreography by Andrew Palermo and music supervision, arrangements and orchestrations by Lynne ShankelAllegiance – A New American Musical will run on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center, Sept. 7 Oct. 21, 2012. 

As previously announced, television and film icon George Takei, Tony Award-winning actress Lea Salonga and Broadway favorite Telly Leung head up the cast. Best known for portraying Mr. Sulu in the “Star Trek” series, Takei’s acting career has spanned more than five decades with more than 40 feature films and hundreds of television roles to his credit.  Takei and his family, along with 120,000 other Japanese Americans, were unjustly incarcerated behind the barbed-wire enclosures of United States internment camps at the outbreak of World War II. Salonga originated the role of Kim in the West End and Broadway productions of Miss Saigon, winning the Tony and Olivier Awards, among others.  She was the first Asian to play Eponine in Les Misérables on Broadway and was the singing voice of Princess Jasmine in Aladdin and Fa Mulan in Mulan. Leung most recently appeared in the Broadway revival of Godspell.  His other Broadway credits include Flower Drum Song, Pacific Overtures and the final company of Rent, and he has appeared on several episodes of “Glee” (Wes, Dalton Academy Warblers).

Joining the cast is Paolo Montalban as Mike Masaoka, the polarizing real-life leader who encouraged cooperation with the internment despite being Japanese American himself.  Montalban is best known for playing the Prince in Wonderful World of Disney’s Cinderella and has appeared on Broadway in Pacific Overtures and The King and I.

The cast also features Michael K. Lee (Frankie Suzuki), Paul Nakauchi (Tatsuo Kimura) and Allie Trimm (Hannah Campbell) with Katie Boren, Jon Jon Briones, Geno Carr, Karl Josef Co, Marc de la Cruz, MaryAnn Hu, Brandon Joel Maier, Kürt Norby, Ann Sanders, Jill Townsend, Kay Trinidad and Scott Watanabe (Ensemble) and Jennifer Hubilla and Conrad Ricamora (Swings).

The creative team includes Donyale Werle (Scenic Design), Alejo Vietti (Costume Design), Howell Binkley (Lighting Design), Jonathan Deans (Sound Design), Darrel Maloney (Projection Design), Jan Gist (Dialect Coach) Telsey + Company (Casting) and Anjee Nero (Stage Manager).

To view additional photos of the cast of Allegiance, visit our Facebook page!


Lea Salonga and George Takei.


Telly Leung and Allie Trimm.


The cast of Allegiance: (back row, from left) Scott Watanabe, Conrad Ricamora, Brandon Joel Maier and Karl Josef Co; (third row) Michael K. Lee, Marc de la Cruz, Geno Carr, Paolo Montalban and Kurt Norby; (second row) Jon Jon Briones, Jill Townsend, Paul Nakaushi, Ann Sanders, MaryAnn Hu, Telly Leung and Jennifer Hubilla; (front row) Kay Trinidad, Katie Boren, Lea Salonga, George Takei and Allie Trimm. The World Premiere of Allegiance - A New American Musical, with music and lyrics by Jay Kuo and book by Marc Acito, Kuo and Lorenzo Thione, directed by Stafford Arima, will run Sept. 7 - Oct. 21, 2012 at The Old Globe. Photo by Henry DiRocco.


(from left) Michael K. Lee, George Takei, Lea Salonga, Paolo Montalban, Allie Trimm, Telly Leung and Paul Nakauchi.


(from left) Co-book writer Lorenzo Thione, composer, lyricist and co-book writer Jay Kuo and co-book writer Marc Acito.


THE OLD GLOBE WILL PRESENT WENDY MARUYAMA’S ART INSTALLATION “THE TAG PROJECT”

(8/3/12) • The Old Globe will present artist Wendy Maruyama’s large-scale sculptural installation “The Tag Project” in conjunction with the World Premiere of Allegiance – A New American Musical, which will run on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center.  “The Tag Project” memorializes the nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans who were imprisoned in U.S. internment camps during World War II.  The project consists of 10 groupings of replicas of the historic identification labels issued to every internee, including their name, number and the camp to which they were relocated.  Three of the groupings will be hung in the upper lobby of the Old Globe Theatre during the run of Allegiance from Sept. 7 Oct. 21, 2012.  The musical tells the story of one Japanese American family’s struggles during the internment and stars television and film icon George Takei, who was imprisoned in the Camp Rohwer and Camp Tule Lake internment camps as a child.  Admittance to the exhibit is included in the ticket price to Allegiance. 

Wendy Maruyama is an artist and educator from San Diego and has been making furniture and art since 1970.  Her work is often inspired by extended residencies and visits to various countries such as France, England, Japan, Korea and China.  In the past 15 years her work has taken on stylistic influences from Asia.  Born in La Junta, Colorado, to second-generation Japanese American parents, she made several pilgrimages to the land of her heritage, Japan.  At times reverent of Japan’s craft history and advanced technology, and appalled by Japan’s self-indulgent, materialistic and almost faceless and patriarchal society, she vacillates between creating works that both emulate and satirize contemporary Japan.  Her newest works, “The Tag Project” and “Executive Order 9066,” are hitting closer to home—the works are influenced by personal and family history and addresses the internment of Japanese Americans in 1942.

To view additional photos of “The Tag Project” and Allegiance, visit our Facebook page!


Wendy Maruyama's art installation "The Tag Project" on display in the University Art Gallery at San Diego State University. "The Tag Project" will be displayed at The Old Globe in conjunction with the World Premiere production of Allegiance - A New American Musical, Sept. 7 - Oct. 21, 2012. Photo by Kevin J. Miyazaki.


A CELEBRATION FOR THE CHILD IN ALL OF US

(8/2/12) • Once the hilarious onstage fireworks of God of Carnage settled down, the team from Yasmina Rez'a comedy celebrated their opening night in Hattox Hall. There were no signs of the squabbling and screaming of the show as the cast members and creative team were joined by Globe staff and Board members for a fun night of friends and food. To view additional photos of God of Carnage, visit our Facebook page!


Director Richard Seer (center) with cast members
(from left) T. Ryder Smith, Caitlin Muelder, Erika Rolfsrud and Lucas Caleb Rooney.


(from left) Director Richard Seer, cast member Erika Rolfsrud and Old Globe Managing Director Michael G. Murphy.


(from left) Cast members Caitlin Muelder,
Lucas Caleb Rooney and Erika Rolfsrud.


Board member Sandra Redman from Production Sponsor California Bank & Trust and Jeff Mueller (center) with cast members (from left) T. Ryder Smith, Caitlin Muelder, Erika Rolfsrud and Lucas Caleb Rooney.


Stage manager Annette Yé and cast member Lucas Caleb Rooney.


Assistant director Hannah Ryan and
lighting designer Chris Rynne.
(Photos by Jeffrey Weiser.)


THE GLOBE WILL PRESENT AN AUTISM-FRIENDLY PERFORMANCE OF THE GRINCH

(7/23/12) • The Old Globe will offer an autism-friendly performance of the holiday musical Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! on Saturday, Dec. 15 at 10:30 a.m.  Following in the footsteps of successful autism-friendly performances of The Lion King and Mary Poppins on Broadway, The Grinch will be performed in a friendly and supportive environment for children on the autism spectrum and their families.  Slight adjustments will be made to the production including fewer loud noises and flashing lights that may be challenging for some audience members.  Tickets to the Dec. 15 autism-friendly performance go on sale Sept. 9.  Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! will run Nov. 17 – Dec. 29 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center.  For additional information, click here.

In addition to the adjustments made to the show, additional features will help make the experience safer and more enjoyable for children with autism and other sensitivity issues.  To better prepare children for the performance, a pre-show visit to the Globe will be offered to familiarize children with Balboa Park and the Old Globe Theatre.  An online social story will also be available for parents to view and print at home that will outline in words and pictures the experience that families will undergo during their trip to see Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!  The lobby of the theatre will serve as a quiet area if a child needs to leave their seat during the show.  On-site volunteers will be on hand to assist families as needed as they arrive at the Old Globe Theatre and throughout the performance.  Theatre Development Fund’s (TDF) Autism Theatre Initiative serves as an advisor for The Old Globe’s autism-friendly Grinch performance (www.tdf.org/autism).

Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! features book and lyrics by Timothy Mason and music by Mel Marvin.  The original production of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! was conceived and directed by Jack O’Brien with additional lyrics by Theodor S. Geisel, additional music by Albert Hague and original choreography by John DeLucaJames Vasquez returns to direct this year’s production.

To view additional photos of The Grinch, visit our Facebook page!

(Photo: Caitlin McAuliffe as Cindy-Lou Who and Steve Blanchard as The Grinch in the 2011 production of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! Photo by Henry DiRocco.)


THE CRITICS FIND A LOT TO LOVE IN THE 2012 SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

(7/19/12) • The Globe's 2012 Shakespeare Festival is in full swing, and audiences and critics are falling for As You Like It, Richard III and Inherit the Wind. The Festival runs through September 30 in the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre.

AS YOU LIKE IT

CRITIC’S CHOICE!
“This is one of those shows with a few too many indelible moments to
itemize, cultivating feelings of affection with an alchemy of smartly crafted scenes.”
-U-T San Diego


Dana Green as Rosalind and Dan Amboyer as Orlando.


(from left) Adrian Sparks as Corin and
Joseph Marcell as Touchstone.

RICHARD III

CRITIC’S CHOICE!
“Exhilarating! Director Lindsay Posner's Richard III kicks off the Globe's
Summer Shakespeare Festival with zest, intelligence and high drama.
A vibrant, full-bodied performance by Jay Whittaker.”
-North County Times


Dana Green as Queen Elizabeth and
Jay Whittaker as Richard III.


The cast of Richard III.

INHERIT THE WIND

CRITIC’S CHOICE!
“Spellbinding! Adrian Noble's direction is so assured and masterful,
and its two stars are at the top of their craft, so get ready sports fans,
the game is afoot and it's definitely a battle worth watching.”
-North County Times


(from left) Robert Foxworth as Henry Drummond and
Dan Amboyer as Bertram Cates.


Adrian Sparks as Matthew Harrison Brady.

To view additional photos from the 2012 Shakespeare Festival, visit our Facebook page!


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