2015 Globe Experiences


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The Old Globe's Summer Shakespeare Intensive Will Present One-Hour Versions of LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST and THE TEMPEST!

July 31, 2015—Each year, a select group of talented high school students participate in the Summer Shakespeare Intensive. This four-week program, which guides students through workshops and rehearsals, will culminate with a public performance of two, one-hour versions of Shakespeare’s plays, Love’s Labor’s Lost, directed by Ray Chambers,and The Tempest, directed by Vivia Font, on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center, on Monday, August 10 at 7:00 p.m. Your coverage is welcome for this great presentation, but not for review, simply to enjoy the next generation of great Shakespearean actors to strut upon our stage. Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

The Old Globe's 2014 Summer Shakespeare Intensive for high school students presented one-hour versions of Julius Caesar and The Comedy of Errors in the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre on Aug. 18, 2014. Photo by Douglas Gates.

The four-week program began on July 11 and continues through August 10. It is an unparalleled opportunity for serious high school students to develop their skills in a professional setting and perform at The Old Globe in front of their family, friends, and theatre professionals. They also learned from Artistic Director Barry Edelstein and visiting artists from Twelfth Night, Kiss Me, Kate, and The Comedy of Errors, including Jan Gist, James T. Lane, Jake Millgard, Megan M. Storti, and Sara Topham.Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

Students in the Summer Shakespeare Intensive study classical theatre technique, voice, movement, and stage combat led by theatre professionals while rehearsing for two productions of Shakespeare’s plays. Throughout the Intensive, the students have the unique opportunity to study Shakespeare and see the productions of the Globe’s Shakespeare Festival, which runs concurrently with the program. Festival company members lend the students insights into the art of performing Shakespeare that the students then apply to their own performances of the Bard’s work.Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

Love’s Labor’s Lost is set in the court of Navarre, where King Ferdinand and his chief courtiers have sworn off love and the pleasures of the flesh to study and learn. They are quickly thwarted by the arrival of the Princess of France and her ladies-in-waiting, all of whom fall for the wannabe scholars. Love, power, and a battle of the sexes collide in this charming Shakespearean classic.Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

The Love’s Labor’s Lostacting company includes Dan Yelle Baines, Mendel Baljon, Samuel Bennett, Jordi Bertran, Georgiana Cassell, Micah Fong, Eric Gabriel, Mallory Johnson, Kaelyn Kappes, Lauren “Lola” Maniaci, Jean Ervin Mayo, AR Morel, Marie Osterman, Athena Ramos-Hagle, Collin Seaman, Claire St. Marie, Christopher Torborg, and Isabella Rose Wagner.Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

Since first training with The Old Globe in the mid-80s, Ray Chambers (Director, Love’s Labor’s Lost) has worked as a classical actor and director with numerous regional theatres across the country. For nearly two decades as an Associate Artist with the Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Mr. Chambers has worked as an actor, director, writer, and instructor and served as Director of the Master of Fine Arts/Professional Actor Training Program at ASF from 2001-2009. His regional acting credits include title roles in Hamlet, The Count of Monte Cristo, Richard III, Coriolanus, King John, Henry V, and Tartuffe; as well as leading roles in Julius Caesar, The Winter’s Tale, The Rivals, Henry IV, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Great Expectations, The Importance of Being Earnest, and Saint Joan, among many others. His credits at The Old Globe include Antony and Cleopatra, The Comedy of Errors, The School for Scandal, Coriolanus, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Hamlet, and Macbeth. He has taught acting and classical text in master classes and workshops for universities and theatres around the country and has served as a national board member of the University/Resident Theatre Association.Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

Romance, magic, and a deserted island—the final and most beloved masterpiece of Shakespeare’s life, The Tempest, places the desire for revenge against the demands of love and captures the essence of the human condition with its compelling and timeless themes. Marooned on a distant island with his daughter Miranda, Prospero has spent 12 years perfecting his magic. When he learns that a ship bearing his old enemies is sailing near the island he raises a torrential storm, bringing within his grasp the enemies who robbed him of his dukedom. An enchanted tale filled with humor, romance and adventure, The Tempest is ultimately a tale of redemption and forgiveness.Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

The Tempestacting company includes Rachael Bell, Danielle Bongiovanni, Lolita Burgess, Sophie Cobarrubia, Shakura Davis, Gabriella “Brie” Edwards, Sarai Fuentes, Spencer Lynn, Phillip Magin, Gordon “Lane” Palhegyi, Annika Patton, Issie Prince, Davina Van Dusen, and Jake Wascher.Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

Vivia Font (Director, The Tempest) is returning for her fourth Summer Shakespeare Intensive. Her previous shows directed for the Intensive include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Pericles, and Romeo y Julieta. She studied directing at New York University’s undergraduate program and is an alumna from the Old Globe/University of San Diego Graduate Theatre Program, where she also performed professionally at The Old Globe in Richard III, As You Like It, Inherit the Wind, All’s Well That Ends Well, Six Degrees of Separation, and others. Her New York acting credits include underneathmybed (Rattlestick Playwrights Theater), Menders (The Gym at Judson), and Goethe’s Faust (Blue Heron Theatre). She has appeared in classic and contemporary plays at Arizona Theatre Company, Denver Center Theatre Company, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and McCarter Theatre Center. As a teaching artist, Font has worked as a teacher and director at UC San Marcos, The Old Globe, McCarter, George Street Playhouse, Creative Arts Team, Only Make Believe, and others. She participated in a high school Shakespeare program that changed her life and is thrilled to be a part of giving some of that experience back to these students.Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

The design team includes Shelly Williams (Costume Design), Jack Bender (Lighting Design), Melanie Chen (Sound Design), Annika Patton (Composer), James T. Lane, Kristina Cobarrubia, and Davina Van Dusen (Choreography).Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

The Globe also runs a Middle School Summer Conservatory, a three-week program of intense acting study with professional teaching staff and actors from the Shakespeare Festival’s repertory company, which took place June 29 – July 17. Students explored scene study, stage combat, theatre games, improvisation, movement, and specialty workshops.Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

To learn more, click here!


BREAKING NEWS: Special event at The Old Globe!

A special appearance by acclaimed comic playwright Ken Ludwig, Author of Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, on Sunday, July 26 at 5:30 p.m. in Hattox Hall!


Playwright Ken Ludwig. Photo by Leslie Cashen.


(July 16, 2015)—The Old Globe is delighted to announce an extra-special appearance—an hour-long interview/conversation with one of America's great comic playwrights, Ken Ludwig, familiar to millions for Lend Me a Tenor and Crazy for You)—on Sunday, July 26 at 5:30 p.m. prior to the 7:00 p.m. preview of his new and very popular play, Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery.

Join Old Globe Literary Manager Danielle Mages Amato as she welcomes this acclaimed playwright for a lively and wide-ranging conversation about his career, the continuing fascination with Sherlock Holmes, and his award-winning new book, How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare. The hour-long event will conclude with a book-signing, and will be held in the Globe's Hattox Hall, located in the Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Admission is Free.

To learn more, click here!

 

 


Kiss Me, Kate will now add a week by popular demand and run through August 9!

(July 10, 2015)—The Old Globe’s presentation of Kiss Me, Kate, the classic musical comedy featuring a book by Sam and Bella Spewack and an iconic score by Cole Porter, will now add a week by popular demand and run through August 9 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Tickets for the extension will go on sale this Sunday, July 12 at noon. This spectacular revival, a co-production with Hartford Stage, is choreographed by Peggy Hickey and directed by Hartford Stage Artistic Director and former Old Globe Shakespeare Festival Artistic Director Darko Tresnjak, who won the 2014 Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical for A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, which made its world premiere at The Old Globe and Hartford Stage in 2013. The Hartford Stage engagement ran May 14 – June 14.

Mike McGowan and Anastasia Barzee. Photo courtesy of
The Old Globe.

Following the backstage antics of a touring production of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, the Globe’s production of Kiss Me, Kate runs concurrently with the theatre’s annual Shakespeare Festival and continues the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration. Single tickets are on sale now and can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

>Fresh off his Tony Award-winning smash, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, Darko Tresnjak returns to the Globe to helm one of the greate4t romantic musical comedies of all time. Cole Porter’s witty and high-spirited songs will transport you into the wings as a touring company gets ready to open a musical version of The Taming of the Shrew, starring a divorced couple whose offstage battles threaten to bring down the curtain. This beloved classic features show-stopping dance numbers, Shakespeare-quoting mobsters, and a knockout score including “Another Op’nin’, Another Show,” “Wunderbar,” “So In Love,” and “Brush Up Your Shakespeare.” Get ready for a sizzling summer evening that’s simply “Too Darn Hot”!

To learn more, click here!


The cast and creative team have been announced for The Comedy of Errors!

Glenn Howerton and Rory O'Malley. Photo courtesy of The Old Globe.

 

(July 9, 2015)—The complete cast and creative team have been announced for The Comedy of Errors as The Old Globe’s 2015 Summer Shakespeare Festival continues the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration. With three shows on Broadway this year, Tony and Emmy Award nominee Scott Ellis makes his Globe debut directing one of William Shakespeare’s most delightful confections. The Old Globe engagement will begin performances on August 16 and run through September 20, 2015, with opening night on Saturday, August 22 at 8:00 p.m., in the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre.

Subscription tickets to the Globe’s 2015 Summer Season range from $115 to $346. Single tickets are on sale now and start at $29. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

Laughter will ring out under the stars as Shakespeare’s hilarious tale of mistaken identity takes the outdoor stage. A young man and his servant arrive in town, unaware that each of them has a separated-at-birth identical twin already there. This can’t end well—or maybe it can, but not before the unexpected double vision leads to furious wives, confused mistresses, scandalized family members, and general mayhem.

Portraying the very confused sets of twins are Glenn Howerton as Antipholus of Ephesus/Antipholus of Syracuse (“It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,” “The Mindy Project,” “Fargo”) and Tony Award nominee Rory O’Malley as Dromio of Ephesus/Dromio of Syracuse (Broadway’s The Book of Mormon, Off Broadway’s Nobody Loves You, Little Miss Sunshine). The cast also features Megan Dodds as Adriana (West End’s My Name Is Rachel Corrie, Williamstown Theatre Festival’s As You Like It directed by Barry Edelstein), Barrett Doss as Luciana (You Can’t Take It with You on Broadway, Strom Thurmond is Not a Racist Off Broadway), Austin Durant as Duke Solinus and Doctor Pinch (Globe’s Anna Christie, Broadway’s You Can’t Take It with You, War Horse, Macbeth), Patrick Kerr as Egeon (this season’s Twelfth Night at the Globe, You Can’t Take It with You on Broadway), Garth Schilling as Courtesan (known for his alter ego, Miss Vodka Stinger, with five shows at 54 Below), and Globe Associate Artist Deborah Taylor as Emilia (most recently at the Globe in Pygmalion, Romeo and Juliet, The Merry Wives of Windsor).

Joining them are Old Globe/University of San Diego Graduate Theatre Program actors Amy Blackman (Ensemble), Lindsay Brill* (Luce), Charlotte Bydwell* (Ensemble), Lowell Byers* (Angelo), Ally Carey (Ensemble), Jamal Douglas* (Balthazar), Tyler Kent* (Dromio Double), Jake Millgard (Jailer), Makha Mthembu (1st Merchant), Daniel Petzold (Antipholus Double), Megan M. Storti* (Messenger), Nathan Whitmer (Ensemble), and Patrick Zeller* (2nd Merchant). *Recent graduates of the M.F.A. program.

The creative team also includes Alexander Dodge (Scenic Design), Linda Cho (Costume Design), Philip S. Rosenberg (Lighting Design), Acme Sound Partners (Sound Design), Derek Cannon (Music Director), Ursula Meyer (Voice and Text Coach), Jim Carnahan, CSA (Casting), and Charles Means (Production Stage Manager).

“This gifted cast, under the inventive and witty direction of the great Scott Ellis, is sure to make this funny and wild Shakespearean comedy shine as bright as the stars in the San Diego sky,” said Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “I look forward to sharing their work with the Globe’s summer audiences.”

To learn more, click here!


The Old Globe will celebrate 80 Years of Extraordinary Theatre at the 2015 Globe Gala!

July 2, 2015—The Old Globe will celebrate 80 Years of Extraordinary Theatre, from its founding in 1935 through the current 2015 Anniversary Season, in the art deco splendor of Club 3515, at the 2015 Globe Gala on Saturday, July 25 in support of the theatre’s education and artistic programs. The annual event will feature an exclusive, one-night-only cabaret performance by Carmen Cusack, who recently starred in the World Premiere of Bright Star at the Globe. Pamela Cesak, Jo Ann Kilty, and Vicki Zeiger serve as Co-Chairs of the 2015 Globe Gala.

Fireworks light up the sky at The Old Globe's 2014 Gala, Saturday, July 26 on the Globe's history campus in Balboa Park. The 2015 Globe Gala will take place on Saturday, July 25. Photo by Douglas Gates.

 

 

 

The black-tie event will begin at 6:00 p.m. with a reception on the Globe’s Copley Plaza, followed by Carmen Cusack’s performance at 7:00 p.m. on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. After the performance, dinner and dancing to the swing music of The Cab Calloway Orchestra, directed by Cab’s grandson Brooks Calloway, will commence on Copley Plaza until midnight. Giuseppe Fine Catering will cater the reception and dinner. Valet parking is included in the price of the ticket.

Tickets are $800 (regular seating) and $1,000 (VIP seating) each and include the reception, performance, dinner, and dancing. Tables are also available starting at $8,000. Underwriting levels, which include tickets for the Gala, begin at $4,500 per couple. To purchase tickets or a table or to become an underwriter, contact Eileen Prisby, Events Director, at (619) 684-4146 or eprisby@TheOldGlobe.org. All net proceeds support the Globe’s artistic and educational programs.

“When I first arrived in San Diego, everyone told me that the Globe Gala is the best party in town,” said Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “Indeed it is. It’s an elegant night of great music, superb food, and, in the brilliant Carmen Cusack, entertainment as thrilling as it gets. It’s also an occasion for lovers and supporters of the Globe and its work to come together to celebrate an institution that’s central to the fabric of our city. My wife and I are looking forward to this spectacular and happy night.”

Carmen Cusack made her Globe debut last year and received a Craig Noel Award nomination for her portrayal of Alice Murphy in Edie Brickell and Steve Martin’s World Premiere musical Bright Star. Carmen recently played Annie in the new musical First Wives Club at Chicago’s Oriental Theatre, the Mother in Ragtime (Milwaukee Repertory Theater), and Dot/Marie in Sunday in the Park with George (Jeff Award nomination, Chicago Shakespeare Theater). Her other theatre credits include Lynn Gardner in Carrie (MCC Theater), her Helen Hayes Award-nominated portrayal of Nellie Forbush in Broadway/Lincoln Center Theater’s national tour of South Pacific, and Elphaba in Wicked (Chicago, first national tour, and Melbourne, Australia). Her West End credits include Chesty Prospects in Saucy Jack and the Space Vixens, Eva Cassidy in Over the Rainbow (U.K. and Ireland), Fantine in Les Misérables, Rose in The Secret Garden (Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon, and West End), Kim in Personals, and Christine in The Phantom of the Opera. Prior to her West End career, Ms. Cusack studied opera performance at the University of North Texas. In her downtime she plays and writes music and is embarking on her first original album.

The Globe is most appreciative of the many local vendors providing services to make this a great event: Kathy Wright & Co. (décor), Giuseppe Fine Catering (meal), Snake Oil Cocktail Company (bar service), Classic Party Rentals (furnishings), Special Event Audio Services, Inc. (lighting and sound), CleverCo Design (lighting and set design for the dinner dance), Ace Parking Valet Service (valet parking), Freellance (graphic design), Neiman Marcus (Gala gifts), and Toby Russell Events (video projections and late-night DJ).

To learn more, click here!


The Cast and Creative Team have been announced for Kiss Me, Kate!

June 24, 2015—The complete cast and creative team have been announced for The Old Globe’s presentation of Kiss Me, Kate, the classic musical comedy featuring a book by Sam and Bella Spewack and an iconic score by Cole Porter. This spectacular revival, a co-production with Hartford Stage, is choreographed by Peggy Hickey and directed by Hartford Stage Artistic Director and former Old Globe Shakespeare Festival Artistic Director Darko Tresnjak, who won the 2014 Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical for A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, which made its world premiere at The Old Globe and Hartford Stage in 2013. The Hartford Stage engagement ran May 14 – June 14; The Old Globe engagement will begin performances on July 1 and run through August 2, with opening night on Thursday, July 9 at 8:00 p.m., on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center.

The cast of the Hartford Stage/Old Globe co-production of Kiss Me, Kate. Photo by T Charles Erickson.

Following the backstage antics of a touring production of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, the Globe’s production of Kiss Me, Kate runs concurrently with the theatre’s annual Shakespeare Festival and continues the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration. Single tickets are on sale now and can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

Fresh off his Tony Award-winning smash, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, Darko Tresnjak returns to the Globe to helm one of the greatest romantic musical comedies of all time. Cole Porter’s witty and high-spirited songs will transport you into the wings as a touring company gets ready to open a musical version of The Taming of the Shrew, starring a divorced couple whose offstage battles threaten to bring down the curtain. This beloved classic features show-stopping dance numbers, Shakespeare-quoting mobsters, and a knockout score including “Another Op’nin’, Another Show,” “Wunderbar,” “So In Love,” and “Brush Up Your Shakespeare.” Get ready for a sizzling summer evening that’s simply “Too Darn Hot”!

Mike McGowan (Priscilla Queen of the Desert on Broadway) and Anastasia Barzee (Urinetown on Broadway) star as former lovers and reluctant co-stars Fred/Petruchio and Lilli/Kate. The cast also features Megan Sikora as Lois/Bianca (Curtains on Broadway) and Tyler Hanes as Bill/Lucentio (A Chorus Line on Broadway), Joel Blum as First Man (Tony Award nominee for Show Boat and Steel Pier) and Brendan Averett as Second Man (The Killer at Theatre for a New Audience), and Tony Lawson as General Harrison Howell (Les Misérables on Broadway). The marvelous company also includes Giovanni Bonaventura as Hortensio (Cinderella on Broadway), James T. Lane as Paul (The Scottsboro Boys on Broadway), Barrett Martin as Gremio (Side Show on Broadway), Robin Masella as Momo (Chicago national tour), Shina Ann Morris as Venetia (Cinderella on Broadway), Jane Papageorge as Becki Weckio (Hair at the Hollywood Bowl), Wayne W. Pretlow as Pops/Priest (The Most Happy Fella at City Center Encores!), Mike Sears as Ralph (the Globe’s Othello), Michael Starr as Philip (Guys and Dolls in L.A.), Jeff Steitzer as Harry Trevor/Baptista Minola (The Front Page at Long Wharf Theatre), Johnny Stellard as Nathaniel (Evita on Broadway), and Aurelia Williams as Hattie (Off Broadway hit Sistas the Musical).

The creative team includes Alexander Dodge (Scenic Design), Fabio Toblini (Costume Design), Philip S. Rosenberg (Lighting Design), Jonathan Deans (Sound Design), Kris Kukul (Music Director), Jason Allen (Wig Design), Claudia Hill-Sparks (Vocal and Text Coach), J. Allen Suddeth (Fight Director), Binder Casting (Casting), Max Mamon (Associate Music Director), and Anjee Nero (Production Stage Manager).

Kiss Me, Kate is one of the great musicals, full of charm, wit, and fun,” said Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “I can’t think of a more entertaining show to place at the center of our celebratory Summer Season, and I can’t think of a better director than my friend and colleague Darko Tresnjak to helm it. I’m looking forward to every second.”

“I started thinking about directing Kiss Me, Kate in 1990, when the influential album Red Hot + Blue: A Tribute to Cole Porter introduced his smart and sexy music to a whole new generation,” said Darko Tresnjak. “After 25 years, I’m thrilled to finally get a chance to direct this supreme entertainment—a piece in which my two great theatrical passions, the plays of William Shakespeare and the American musical theatre, come together.”

The original 1949 production of Kiss Me, Kate ran for more than 1,000 performances on Broadway and won the first Tony Award for Best Musical. It was recently announced that the cast album will be added to the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry.

In addition to Kiss Me, Kate, the legendary Cole Porter’s shows included Anything Goes, Can-Can, Silk Stockings, and DuBarry Was a Lady. Husband-and-wife writing team Sam and Bella Spewack’s credits include the films My Favorite Wife (Academy Award nomination) and Week-End at the Waldorf starring Ginger Rogers, as well as the play My Three Angels. The Spewacks each won two Tony Awards for Kiss Me, Kate.

Darko Tresnjak won the Tony, the Drama Desk, the Outer Critics Circle, the Connecticut Critics Circle, and the San Diego Theatre Critics Circle Craig Noel Awards for his direction of A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder. He recently won the Obie Award for his direction of The Killer, with Michael Shannon, at Theatre for a New Audience. His favorite Old Globe credits include The Women, Cyrano de Bergerac,and Pericles. His recent directing credits include Hamlet at Hartford Stage, where he is the Artistic Director, and The Ghosts of Versailles, with Patti LuPone, at LA Opera. Tresnjak’s pcoming productions include the stage thriller Rear Window and the world premiere musical Anastasia, both at Hartford Stage, and the national tour of A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder.

Peggy Hickey made her Broadway debut with A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, which she also choreographed in the show’s world premiere at The Old Globe and Hartford Stage. Her New York theatre credits include The Most Happy Fella, La Rondine, Lucky to Be Me (the Leonard Bernstein tribute at New York City Center), My Fair Lady, Hansel und Gretel (“Live from Lincoln Center”), Antony and Cleopatra, and Babes in Toyland. Her regional credits include Carnival, Amour, A Little Night Music, King of Hearts, On the Twentieth Century, and Brigadoon (Goodspeed Musicals), among others. Her film and television credits include The Brady Bunch Movie and the music video for Beck’s “The New Pollution” (MTV Video Music Award).

To learn more, click here!


The cast and creative team have been announced for Ken Ludwig's Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery!

June 18, 2015—The complete cast and creative team have been announced for the West Coast Premiere of Ken Ludwig’s Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, a new work by one of America’s great comic playwrights, familiar to millions for Lend Me a Tenor and Crazy for You. Baskerville is directed by Josh Rhodes, who previously choreographed the Globe’s productions of Bright Star and Working, as well as Broadway’s It Shoulda Been You, First Date, and Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella. The Old Globe engagement will begin performances on July 24, with opening night on Thursday, July 30 at 8:00 p.m., in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Although originally scheduled to run through August 23, Baskerville has been extended by popular demand through August 30, 2015!

(from left)Blake Segal, Usman Ally, Euan Morton, Liz Wisan, and Andrew Kober.

The 2015 Summer Season continues the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration. Tickets for Ken Ludwig’s Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery are currently available by subscription only and are flying out the door! Subscription packages to the Globe’s 2015 Summer Season range from $97 to $346. Single tickets start at $29 and go on sale Friday, June 19 at 12 noon. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

A wildly inventive adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mystery The Hound of the Baskervilles makes its West Coast premiere. Ken Ludwig brings to life literature’s most famous detective—the inimitable Sherlock Holmes. Five fearless actors conjure the world of Victorian England as Holmes and Watson take on one of the most diabolical cases of their careers. This witty and clever romp delivers chills, laughter, and a great evening of theatre.

Tony Award nominee Euan Morton plays the intrepid Sherlock Holmes. He was last at the Globe as Michelangelo Buonarroti in 2012’s Divine Rivalry. Heoriginated the role of Boy George in Taboo on Broadway and the West End, appeared in Broadway’s Cyrano de Bergerac and Sondheim on Sondheim, and won an Obie Award for Measure for Pleasure at The Public Theater. Usman Ally is his trusted colleague Doctor Watson. He received a 2015 Obie Award for Off Broadway’s The Invisible Hand and has also appeared in Disgraced, The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity, The Jungle Book, “Madam Secretary,” and “Damages.” The 45 other people in the play are portrayed by Blake Segal as Man One (Mary Poppins national tour, Off Broadway’s Bones in the Basket and Les Enfants de Paris, “Blue Bloods”), Andrew Kober as Man Two (Broadway’s Les Misérables and Hair, “House of Cards,” “Boardwalk Empire”), and Liz Wisan as Woman One (Other Desert Cities on Broadway, Bill W. and Dr. Bob Off Broadway, the films Ready or Knot and Bitches, “Elementary”).

The creative team also includes Wilson Chin (Scenic Design), Shirley Pierson (Costume Design), Austin R. Smith (Lighting Design), Bart Fasbender (Original Music and Sound Design), David Huber (Vocal Coach), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Annette Yé (Production Stage Manager).

“Ken Ludwig is an American master and one of the finest comic dramatists we have,” said Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “I am thrilled to bring his latest brilliant creation to San Diego. It doesn’t take a super detective to figure out that our audiences will embrace its hilarious high-style and spine-tingling suspense. Director Josh Rhodes, another shining talent, will bring his own vivid and audacious style to the play, as will a cast as highly talented as any we’ve had here. Add a pipe, a magnifying glass, and a deerstalker hat, and Baskerville will deliver an evening of wit and panache that I know will prove one of the most memorable in Globe history.”

Ken Ludwig (Playwright) is an internationally acclaimed playwright whose work has been performed in more than 30 countries in over 20 languages. He has had six shows on Broadway and seven on London’s West End. His first play on Broadway, Lend Me a Tenor, won two Tony Awards and was nominated for seven. He has also won two Laurence Olivier Awards, a Charles MacArthur Award, two Helen Hayes Awards, an Edgar Award, a Southeastern Theatre Conference Distinguished Career Award, and an Edwin Forrest Award. His newest book, How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare, published by Random House, won a Falstaff Award. His plays have been commissioned by the Royal Shakespeare Company and The Old Vic. He has written 22 plays and musicals, including Crazy for You (five years on Broadway and the West End, Tony and Olivier Award winner for Best Musical), Moon Over Buffalo, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Treasure Island, Twentieth Century, Leading Ladies, Shakespeare in Hollywood, The Game’s Afoot, The Fox on the Fairway, The Three Musketeers, and The Beaux’ Stratagem. His most recent plays include Tiny Tim’s Christmas Carol (2015 Helen Hayes Award nominee), and A Comedy of Tenors, a sequel to Lend Me a Tenor, which will open this fall. His plays have starred Alec Baldwin, Carol Burnett, Lynn Redgrave, Mickey Rooney, Hal Holbrook, Dixie Carter, Tony Shalhoub, Anne Heche, Joan Collins, and Kristin Bell. His work has been published by Yale Review, and he is a Sallie B. Goodman Fellow of McCarter Theatre Center. He holds degrees from Harvard, where he studied music with Leonard Bernstein, Haverford College, and Cambridge University.

Josh Rhodes (Director) previously choreographed the Globe’s productions of Bright Star and Working. His recent Broadway credits include It Shoulda Been You, First Date, and Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella (Outer Critics Circle, Astaire, and Drama Desk Award nominations). He choreographed Company starring Neil Patrick Harris, Sweeney Todd, and Sondheim! The Birthday Concert for the New York Philharmonic and PBS. As a director his credits include Spamalot (The 5th Avenue Theatre), Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Casa Mañana), and Broadway Bares XX and XXI. His other stage credits include Zorba (City Center Encores!), Working (Broadway Playhouse in Chicago, Drama Desk Award-winning production at Prospect Theater Company), John Kander’s The Landing (Vineyard Theatre), Broadway: Three Generations (The Kennedy Center), On the Town (Los Angeles Philharmonic), Annie Get Your Gun starring Patti LuPone (Ravinia Festival), Barnum (Asolo Repertory Theatre, Sarasota Magazine Theater Award), and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (The Shakespeare Theatre Company; Helen Hayes Award nomination).

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Join the Globe for an illuminating Subject Matters post-show of Rich Girl.

Join us after the 2 p.m. matinee performance of Rich Girl on Saturday, June 20 for Subject Matters, an illuminating post-show talk that takes a unique look at the play. This Subject Matters will be led by Wendy Lyon, Financial Advocate for Penn Mutual/Sterling Wealth Strategies. She will walk with the audience about women and finance, a central theme of the play. Do women face unique challenges when it comes to planning their financial futures? What is the current outlook for women in financial careers? What kind of advice might Rich Girl's fictional financial guru Eve Walker be giving her clients today?

Wendy "The Financial Lyon" has a passion to inform, educate, and empower women to create the future they desire, no matter where they are financially. Lyon's seminars for business owners, executives, and entrepreneurs are tailored for the specific needs of women in all stages of life. Having been widowed quite young, she knows full well the importance of building wealth upon a foundation of protection that can withstand the unexpected, and believes everyone is entitled to superior financial advice. She specializes in creating "futures so bright, her clients need sunglasses." Lyon can be heard on ESPN and KCBQ, seen on the CW 6 and OANN, and is a published financial contributor and author.

To learn more, click here!


Bright Star will play The Kennedy Center before a Spring 2016 arrival on Broadway!

(foreground) Carmen Cusack as Alice Murphy with (from left) Scott Wakefield and Joe Jung and the orchestra of the world premiere of Bright Star, 2014 at The Old Globe. Photo by Joan Marcus.

Contact: Rick Miramontez / Andy Snyder
rick@oandmco.com / andy@oandmco.com
212-695-7400

 

 

THE NEW MUSICAL
BRIGHT STAR
WILL PLAY
THE KENNEDY CENTER EISENHOWER THEATER

STRICTLY LIMITED PRE-BROADWAY ENGAGEMENT
DECEMBER 2, 2015 THROUGH JANUARY 10, 2016

MUSIC AND BOOK BY
STEVE MARTIN

MUSIC AND LYRICS BY
EDIE BRICKELL

DIRECTED BY
WALTER BOBBIE

June 16, 2015, New York—Producer Joey Parnes announced today that the new musical Bright Star, from Grammy® and Emmy® winner Steve Martin and Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Edie Brickell, will play a limited engagement at the Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater in Washington, D.C. ahead of an anticipated Spring 2016 opening on Broadway. Directed by Tony Award® winner Walter Bobbie, Bright Star will begin performances on December 2, 2015, with an official opening night of December 17, and play through January 10, 2016.

Inspired by a true event, the wholly original new musical Bright Star tells a sweeping tale of love and redemption set against the rich backdrop of the American South in the 1920s and 40s. When successful literary editor Alice Murphy meets an ambitious young soldier just home from World War II, their connection inspires Alice to confront her past. Together they discover a stunning secret with the power to transform their lives.

With music and book by Steve Martin and music and lyrics by Edie Brickell, Bright Star features direction by Walter Bobbie, choreography by Josh Rhodes, scenic design by Eugene Lee, costume design by Jane Greenwood, lighting design by Japhy Weideman, and sound design by Nevin Steinberg. Bright Star was developed and had its world premiere at The Old Globe in San Diego (Barry Edelstein, Artistic Director; Michael G. Murphy, Managing Director).

Additional information, including casting, will be announced shortly.
###
www.BrightStarMusical.com
www.kennedy-center.org

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To learn more about the Old Globe's 2014 production, click here!


Barry Edelstein to host encore presentation of Thinking Shakespeare Live! on August 8.

June 15, 2015—For many San Diegans, their ability to understand and appreciate the wonders of the Bard during our Summer Shakespeare Festival has increased exponentially since they joined us for Thinking Shakespeare Live!, a 90-minute exploration of the language of Shakespeare led by Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein and assisted by three professional classical actors. Following successful showings in the past two seasons and a recent presentation earlier this month, The Old Globe will offer a reprise on Saturday, August 8 at 11:00 a.m.

Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein (far left) with actors (from left) Krystel Lucas, Jason Maddy and Christopher Salazar during Thinking Shakespeare Live! Photo by Douglas Gates.

This special program based on Edelstein’s book, Thinking Shakespeare: A How-To Guide for Student Actors, Directors, and Anyone Else Who Wants to Feel More Comfortable with the Bard, reveals a performer’s approach to Shakespearean language so audiences may easily understand the poetry of the Bard. An ideal introduction to Shakespeare for families and young audiences, Thinking Shakespeare Live! will take place on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Tickets are currently available to donors and subscribers only and will go on sale to the public on Tuesday, June 30 at 12 noon. Tickets are $10 for subscribers and full-time students and $15 for general audiences and can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

“San Diego’s Shakespeare audience is devoted to the Bard, and the Globe, one of the country’s great Shakespeare theatres, always looks for innovative ways to serve it,” said Edelstein. “We created Thinking Shakespeare Live! to help our audience have fun while making new connections to Shakespeare, and we are pleased to bring it back this summer and make it a regular part of our program.”

Coinciding with The Old Globe’s 2015 Shakespeare Festival, and continuing the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration, Thinking Shakespeare Live! is a fast-paced, funny, and altogether fascinating guide to the language of the Bard. In this lively 90-minute program, Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein, called by NPR “one of the country’s leading Shakespeareans,” provides audiences a unique opportunity to learn the methods he imparts to professional actors in the rehearsal room. As Edelstein and three skilled actors demonstrate these techniques live on stage, this entertaining behind-the-scenes look at the creative process offers a primer on the tools used to hear and understand Shakespeare. With humor and insight, Thinking Shakespeare Live! brings audiences into the intoxicating world of the Bard and shows how his masterful poetry can come to life for everyone.

The three professional actors who will take part in the presentation will be announced at a later date.

To learn more, click here!


The Cast and Creative team have been announced for Shakespeare's Twelfth Night!

May 20, 2015—The complete cast and creative team have been announced for The Old Globe production of William Shakespeare’s delightful and romantic Twelfth Night. Rebecca Taichman, whose production of the time-traveling Time and the Conways fascinated audiences last April, is back to direct the first show of the 2015 Summer Shakespeare Festival. The Old Globe engagement will begin performances on June 21 and run through July 26, 2015, in the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre.

Twelfth Night and the annual Shakespeare Festival continue the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration. Tickets are currently available by subscription only. Subscription tickets to the Globe’s 2015 Summer Season range from $97 to $346. Single tickets go on sale Friday, May 15 at 12 noon and start at $29. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

Everything we love about Shakespeare—romance, music, poetry, laughter, swordplay, great characters, and even a girl in pants!—is in Twelfth Night, one of the Bard’s true comic masterpieces. Shipwrecked and alone in foreign Illyria, young Viola masquerades as a boy and becomes the go-between for the lovesick Duke Orsino and the beautiful Countess Olivia. Soon Viola finds herself in the middle of a topsy-turvy love triangle with lunacy on every side. Visionary director Rebecca Taichman returns to the Globe with a stunning production of one of Shakespeare’s most perfect plays.

(from left) Rutina Wesley, Terence Archie, and Sara Topham.

The cast features Rutina Wesley as Viola (“True Blood,” “Hannibal,” In Darfur at The Public Theater, The Vertical Hour on Broadway), Sara Topham as Olivia (The Importance of Being Earnest on Broadway, U.K. premiere of Intimate Apparel), and LeRoy McClain as Sebastian (Broadway’s The History Boys and Cymbeline, “Madam Secretary”), forming the love triangle, with Amy Aquino as Maria (Broadway’s The Heidi Chronicles, Third), Terence Archie as Orsino (Broadway’s Ragtime, Rocky), Manoel Felciano as Feste (Broadway’s Sweeney Todd, Brooklyn, Jesus Christ Superstar, Cabaret), Robert Joy as Malvolio (Side Show at La Jolla Playhouse and Broadway, The Taming of the Shrew and As You Like It at New York Shakespeare Festival), Patrick Kerr as Andrew Aguecheek (Broadway’s You Can’t Take It with You, Stage Kiss at Playwrights Horizons, His Girl Friday at La Jolla Playhouse), and Tom McGowan as Sir Toby Belch (the Globe’s Rounding Third and Moonlight and Magnolias, Broadway’s Casa Valentina, Wicked, Chicago, Ivanov, La Bête).

Joining them are Old Globe/University of San Diego Graduate Theatre Program actors Amy Blackman (Ensemble), Lindsay Brill (Ensemble), Charlotte Bydwell (Ensemble), Lowell Byers (Antonio, Sea Captain), Ally Carey (Ensemble), Jamal Douglas (2nd Officer), Tyler Kent (Curio), Makha Mthembu (Ensemble), Daniel Petzold (Fabian), Megan M. Storti (Ensemble), Nathan Whitmer (1st Officer), and Patrick Zeller (Valentine).

The creative team also includes Chase Brock (Choreographer), Riccardo Hernandez (Scenic Design), David Israel Reynoso (Costume Design), Christopher Akerlind (Lighting Design), Acme Sound Partners (Sound Design), Todd Almond (Original Music), Ursula Meyer (Vocal Coach), Jim Carnahan, CSA (Casting), and Samantha Greene (Production Stage Manager).

Twelfth Night is supported in part through gifts from John Berol, Ann Davies, S. Mark Taper Foundation, Jeanette Stevens, and Rick and Rhona Thompson.

To learn more, click here!


Join Us For Subject Matters with Beth Accomando this Saturday, May 2!

If you're coming for the matinee, stay for Subject Matters.
If you have tickets for the evening performance, come early, then go to dinner!

Subject Matters will begin around 3:45 p.m.

We'll talk to film critic and fan culture expert Beth Accomando about celebrity culture and the dynamics of fandom. How are fans impacting the creators and the work they love? Are we experiencing a cultural shift from celebrity worship to fan participation? Join us for an invigorating 20-minute post-show discussion.

Beth Accomando.

Beth Accomando covers arts and culture around San Diego for KPBS News. Beth studied film at UCSD and edited the sequels to "The Attack of the Killer Tomatoes." She is a member of the Broadcast Film Critics Association and Online Film Critics Society, and is the past President and former Education Chairperson for the San Diego Film Critics Society. She has run a booth at Comic-Con for more than 10 years to raise money for student filmmaking.

Beth has been a film critic for more than 30 years and began at KPBS in 1987. Since 1997 she has been covering independent and international cinema as well as pop culture for National Public Radio and Public Radio International's The World. She has received numerous Society of Professional Journalist Awards and San Diego Press Club Awards for her radio and web site work at KPBS. She has also received 11 southwestern area Emmy Awards in the categories of producing, writing, and sound design for promotional spots as well as national Pro Max and Telly Awards while working at Fox. In 2013, she won the National Entertainment Journalism Award for best broadcast critic.

She has a passion for Hong Kong cinema, Japanese monster movies, horror, and film noir. She collects movie posters and toys, and loves putting on a haunted house every year.

To learn more, click here!


The Globe announces the cast and creative team for Rich Girl!

April 29, 2015—The Old Globe today announced the complete cast and creative team for the West Coast premiere of an exciting new American play, Rich Girl, by acclaimed playwright Victoria Stewart, continuing the Globe's 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration. Rich Girl will be directed by James Vásquez (Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Richard O'Brien's The Rocky Horror Show), and will play May 23 – June 21, 2015, in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Globe's Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Preview performances run May 23 – 27. Opening night is Thursday, May 28 at 8:00 p.m. Single tickets are currently on sale. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

(from left) Lauren Blumenfeld, Meg Gibson, Carolyn Michelle Smith, and JD Taylor.


Claudine's mother has it all: she's wealthy, successful, and famous. Claudine is awkward, shy, and forever living in her mother's shadow. When a dashing artist sweeps Claudine off her feet, her mother is convinced that all he's after is her money. A modern retelling of the Henry James novel Washington Square, which became the stage and screen classic The Heiress, Rich Girl is a moving and funny new play about mothers and daughters, love and money, and whether they can ever coexist. The News-Herald called it "beautifully written – a thoroughly delightful entertainment!"

The cast for Rich Girl features Lauren Blumenfeld (Claudine, Broadway's The Assembled Parties, "Unforgettable"), Meg Gibson (Eve, the Public Theatre's Talking About Race and Measure for Measure, "The Americans"), Carolyn Michelle Smith (Maggie, Broadway's Romeo and Juliet, "House of Cards"), and JD Taylor (Henry, The Understudy at McCarter Theatre Center, "Elementary," "The Good Wife").

The creative team for Rich Girl includes Wilson Chin (Scenic Design), Shirley Pierson (Costume Design), Amanda Zieve (Lighting Design), Lindsay Jones (Sound Design), Mark Holmes (Video Design), Paul Peterson (Video Design) ,Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Diana Moser (Production Stage Manager). Director Vásquez and designers Chin, Pierson, Zieve, Holmes and Peterson are all local San Diego artists.

"Rich Girl is a terrific new play: smart, fun, and wonderfully fresh, and I am very happy to have it in the Globe's season" said Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. "Victoria Stewart injects vibrant new energy into a classic story, and reinvents its enduring themes so that they speak directly to our contemporary world. A story of mothers and daughters and love and money, it's in many ways a small marvel of playwriting: clever and inventive and moving. And under expert guidance of Globe family member James Vásquez and his expert cast, the play will receive the kind of top-drawer production that Globe audiences expect."

To learn more, click here!


The Old Globe announces its 2015-2016 Season!

April 20, 2015—The Old Globe today shared its 2015-2016 Season, including three world premieres, new works, and classics—and of course, Shakespeare and the Mean Old Grinch return again too! The season will open with the previously announced September 16 world premiere of an exuberant dance-theatre musical, In Your Arms, as 10 of America’s best theatrical storytellers join director-choreographer Christopher Gattelli (Newsies) and composer Stephen Flaherty (Ragtime) to create a ravishing evening that glides, leaps, and twirls through the giddy extremes of romantic love. Long before the devil wore Prada—1995 in fact—the irrepressible Diana Vreeland commanded the stage of the Globe. Oscar and Tony Award winner Mercedes Ruehl (The Fisher King, Lost in Yonkers) brings “The Empress of Fashion” back in Full Gallop on September 26.

(from top left) Andrew Russell, Christopher Gattelli, David Henry Hwang, Carrie Fisher, (second row from left) Kimber Lee, Douglas Carter Beane, David Ives, (lower row from left) Anna Ziegler, Nick Payne, Nilo Cruz, and Mary Louise Wilson.

The Metromaniacs, an uproarious new “translaptation” of a classic French farce by supremely clever playwright David Ives (All in the Timing, Time Flies), will bring Michael Kahn, one of America’s most renowned stage directors, to San Diego for his Globe debut on January 30. In 18th-century Paris, young people have gone métromanie—crazy for poetry. In a gilded sylvan glade, mistaken identity sets in motion a wild story of pseudonyms, plot twists, and plenty of playful poetry. Chaos—and comedy—ensue. It will be followed on February 13 by the world premiere of Anna Ziegler’s The Last Match, directed by Gaye Taylor Upchurch (who recently directed Bethany at the Globe). Developed in the Globe’s 2014 New Voices Festival, this energetic and moving new play set inside the minds of two extraordinary players during the US Open tennis semifinals is a funny and visceral look at the sacrifices we make to stay on top.

Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein makes his musical directing debut on March 24 with Rain, a sumptuous world premiere musical by one of the most significant teams working in theatre today: Michael John LaChiusa (The Wild Party, Giant) and Sybille Pearson (Giant). Based on a short story by Somerset Maugham, Rain follows a group of American travelers thrown together in a boarding house on a tropical South Pacific island. The sudden arrival of another guest, the mysterious and provocative Sadie Thompson, turns their lives upside down in ways they could never have foreseen. Nick Payne’s smash Broadway hit play Constellations arrives April 9, directed by the Globe’s own Richard Seer. A chance encounter between two lost souls opens the door to the infinite possibilities of human relationships. Caroming through the spellbinding journey of being in love, this innovative play considers how the tiniest change in the detail of our lives can lead us on completely different paths.

Pulitzer Prize winner Lawrence Wright’s thrilling new play Camp David, directed by Arena Stage’s Molly Smith, gets serious on May 13 with a you-are-there view of a great historical achievement—the 13 days in September, 1978 when three world leaders came together to attempt a negotiated peace in the Middle East. The legacy of this famous fortnight continues to resonate and tantalize nearly 40 years later. A gorgeous meditation on work, legacy, and the art of perfection, Kimber Lee’s (brownsville song (b-side for tray)) touching toyko fish story arrives May 28. Master sushi chef Koji built his successful career on respect: for tradition, fine ingredients, and the legends who came before him. Now it’s time for a new generation to take over.

Also joining the annual roster November 10 through November 22 is our new Globe for All program, touring Shakespeare to the San Diego community. One of the Bard’s most charming comedies, Much Ado About Nothing, will be directed by Rob Melrose of San Francisco’s renowned Cutting Ball Theater as Globe for All returns to bring free professional Shakespeare directly to diverse and multigenerational audiences in underserved communities around San Diego County. In its inaugural season, Globe for All performed in homeless shelters, centers for the elderly, prisons, and other community venues for nearly 900 audience members, many seeing theatre and Shakespeare for the first time. In addition to its 10 community stops, Globe for All will also play three low-cost performances at the Globe.

Our annual Old Globe/University of San Diego Graduate Theatre Program production, taking place November 14 – 22 and featuring this year’s amazing class of M.F.A. students, will be Shakespeare’s beloved comedy, As You Like It, a lighthearted look at the fickle and passionate nature of love. Directed by Old Globe Associate Producer Justin Waldman, the cast comprises students in the Old Globe/USD Master of Fine Arts program in Dramatic Arts.

The 2015-2016 Season will also welcome everyone’s favorite Green Meanie back at the Globe on November 7 (a week earlier than usual), to delight San Diego families for its 18th joyous year! Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! is a wonderful, whimsical musical based upon the classic Dr. Seuss book. As in years past, The Grinch will be performed on Saturday, December 12 for children on the autism spectrum and their families, as well as other families with special needs that may appreciate the welcoming and supportive environment this performance provides.

“The Old Globe’s 2015-2016 Season represents everything that makes this theatre one of the country’s greatest, and I am beyond excited to announce it,” said Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “These 11 productions range across a wide variety of theatrical styles to tell captivating and exciting stories: stories that are moving, amusing, and entertaining; stories that are about the simplest truths and the biggest themes. They showcase the talents of American stage artists whose excellence dazzles. When I look through the list of names coming to share their artistry with San Diego’s wonderful audiences, I can’t help but smile. In musical theatre, comedy, drama, and dance, on the contemporary stage and the classical, these are quite simply the best we have.” Edelstein continued, “I’m especially pleased to see Shakespeare enjoying pride of place in this season as our best ambassador to our community. Our Globe for All tour, which makes the finest professional theatre newly accessible to a wide swath of the community, expresses the essence of this theatre’s identity. The Globe is a treasure of our region and we are honored to share it.”

In Your Arms, Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Rain, The Metromaniacs, and Camp David will play on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre. Full Gallop, As You Like It, The Last Match, Constellations, and tokyo fish story will run in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre. Both theatres are part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Globe for All’s Much Ado About Nothing tours 10 community venues and returns to the Globe.

To learn more, click here!


The cast and creative team have been announced for Arms and the Man!

April 13, 2015—The Old Globe today announced the complete cast and creative team for George Bernard Shaw’s Arms and the Man, joining celebrated director Jessica Stone, who recently made her Globe debut with Christopher Durang’s Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike. Shaw’s romantic comedy, which continues the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration, will run May 9 – June 14, 2015 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Preview performances run May 9 through 13. Opening night is Thursday, May 14 at 8:00 p.m. Single tickets are currently on sale. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

(from left) Wrenn Schmidt, Zach Appelman, Enver Gjokaj, Marsha Mason, and Conrad John Schuck.

The beautiful Raina Petkoff is about to marry the heroic soldier Sergius. But the battlefield sweeps into her boudoir when an enemy soldier takes refuge under her bed. Soon she will have to decide between her romantic ideals and the surprising sensations of new love. Arms and the Man, utterly romantic and one of the wittiest and most charming plays of the English stage, mixes smarts and silliness in a wonderfully entertaining tale of love and war.

The central love triangle will be portrayed by Wrenn Schmidt as Raina Petkoff (Come Back, Little Sheba on Broadway, “Boardwalk Empire,” “The Americans”), with Enver Gjokaj as her fiancé Major Sergius Saranoff (“Agent Carter,” “Dollhouse,” The Avengers) and Zach Appelman as chocolate cream soldier Captain Bluntschli (War Horse, “Beauty and the Beast”). Four-time Academy Award nominee Marsha Mason plays Catherine Petkoff (The Goodbye Girl, The Prisoner of Second Avenue, “The Middle”), and Conrad John Schuck plays Major Paul Petkoff (Nice Work If You Can Get It, “The Munsters Today,” “McMillan & Wife”). The cast also includes Sofiya Akilova as Louka (“TURN: Washington’s Spies”), Greg Hildreth as Nicola (Broadway’s Cinderella, Peter and the Starcatcher, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson), Old Globe/USD M.F.A. actor Jake Millgard as a Russian Soldier (Pericles, Prince of Tyre), and Ernest Sauceda as Village Musician. The actors in this illustrious company, with innumerable Broadway, film, and television credits, are all making their Globe debuts, except Ms. Mason, previously who graced our stages in a luminous Twelfth Night directed by Jack O’Brien.

The design team includes Ralph Funicello (Scenic Design), David Israel Reynoso (Costume Design), Austin R. Smith (Lighting Design), Mark Bennett (Original Music and Sound Design), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Annette Yé (Production Stage Manager).

“After Shakespeare, the Globe has produced more plays by Shaw than any other author, and that’s as it should be,” said Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “Shaw’s plays have everything we want a great night in the theatre to have: striking and original characters, memorable turns of phrase, tremendous wit, and ideas of substance, and Arms and the Man is Shaw at his greatest. Director Jessica Stone, who is becoming a Globe regular, has exactly the right sensibility for this play, and she has assembled a cast of crackerjack American stage actors who will be a delight to watch.”

George Bernard Shaw (Playwright, 1856-1950) is the second-most produced playwright in Globe history, following only William Shakespeare. Shaw was born in Dublin on July 26, 1856 and immigrated to London in 1878. His first significant attempt at literature was as a novelist; he produced five novels between 1879 and 1888. Eventually he turned to criticism: first art and music (enough to fill volumes) and later theatre. Shaw’s theatre criticism was particularly significant for pointing the way to a theatre he himself would soon create: a theatre of paradox and wit, one that sought engagement with the world and contemporary issues rather than escape from them. As a playwright, Shaw turned out an impressive body of work including more than 50 plays. Some of his better known plays include Man and Superman (1903), Major Barbara (1905), Pygmalion (1912)—which would later be turned into the musical My Fair Lady—and Saint Joan (1923). By the time of his death in 1950, Shaw had received world fame unprecedented for a literary figure and was hailed by worshipers as one of the greatest playwrights in the English language, second only to Shakespeare.

Jessica Stone (Director) recently made her Globe debut directing Christopher Durang’s Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike. She has worked as an actress on and Off Broadway, and in television and film, for the last 20 years. Her Broadway credits include Anything Goes with Sutton Foster, Butley with Nathan Lane, The Odd Couple with Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick, The Smell of the Kill with Claudia Shear, Design for Living with Alan Cumming and Dominic West, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying with John Stamos, and Grease with Rosie O’Donnell. Her Off Broadway credits include Crimes of the Heart, Krisit, The Country Club, June Moon, Tenderloin,and Babes in Arms. She has performed in regional theatres across the country including Huntington Theatre Company, Mark Taper Forum, Geva Theatre, McCarter Theatre Center, and six seasons at Williamstown Theatre Festival. Her favorite productions include She Stoops to Conquer, She Loves Me, Springtime for Henry, Betty’s Summer Vacation, A Midsummer Night’s Dream,and The Cherry Orchard. Concurrently, she was an assistant/associate director on and Off Broadway to Nicholas Martin, Joe Mantello, David Warren, and Christopher Ashley. Stone’s directing career began in earnest with her 2010 production of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum for the Williamstown Theater Festival’s Main Stage, which was met with critical acclaim. Her directing credits now include Neil Simon’s Last of the Red Hot Lovers (Williamstown) and Charlotte’s Web (TheatreworksUSA). Her workshops and readings include Huntington Theatre Company’s Breaking Ground Festival, Hourglass Group Ltd.’s Hot Buttons: A Political Vaudeville, and collaborations with artists such as Joy Behar and Claudia Shear. Stone’s upcoming productions include Kaufman and Lardner’s June Moon for Williamstown (2014) and Absurd Person Singular for Two River Theater Company.

To learn more, click here!


Cast and creative team announced for The Old Globe and Hartford Stage's co-production of Cole Porter's classic showbiz musical Kiss Me, Kate.

Mike McGowan stars as Fred/Petruchio in Kiss Me, Kate.

Anastasia Barzee stars as Lilli/Kate in Kiss Me, Kate.

Directed by Tony Award winner and Old Globe favorite Darko Tresnjak, the musical comedy features the timeless tunes "Another Op'nin', Another Show," "Too Darn Hot," and "Wunderbar"

(April 6, 2015)—The complete cast and creative team have been announced for The Old Globe and Hartford Stage’s co-production of Kiss Me, Kate, the classic musical comedy featuring a book by Sam and Bella Spewack and an iconic score by Cole Porter. This spectacular revival will be choreographed by Peggy Hickey and directed by Hartford Stage Artistic Director and former Old Globe Shakespeare Festival Artistic Director Darko Tresnjak, who won the 2014 Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical for A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, which made its world premiere at The Old Globe and Hartford Stage in 2013. The Hartford Stage engagement runs May 14 – June 14; The Old Globe engagement will begin performances on July 1 and run through August 2, with opening night on Thursday, July 9 at 8:00 p.m.

Following the backstage antics of a touring production of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, the Globe’s production of Kiss Me, Kate runs concurrently with the theatre’s annual Shakespeare Festival and continues the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration. Tickets are currently available by subscription only. Single tickets go on sale Friday, May 22 at 12 noon. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

Fresh off his Tony Award-winning smash, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, Darko Tresnjak returns to the Globe to helm one of the greatest romantic musical comedies of all time. Cole Porter’s witty and high-spirited songs will transport you into the wings as a touring company gets ready to open a musical version of The Taming of the Shrew, starring a divorced couple whose offstage battles threaten to bring down the curtain. This beloved classic features show-stopping dance numbers, Shakespeare-quoting mobsters, and a knockout score including “Another Op’nin’, Another Show,” “Wunderbar,” “So In Love,” and “Brush Up Your Shakespeare.” Get ready for a sizzling summer evening that’s simply “Too Darn Hot”!

Mike McGowan (Priscilla Queen of the Desert on Broadway) and Anastasia Barzee (Urinetown on Broadway) star as former lovers and reluctant co-stars Fred/Petruchio and Lilli/Kate. The cast also features Brendan Averett as Second Man (The Killer at Theatre for a New Audience), Joel Blum as First Man (Tony Award nominee for Show Boat and Steel Pier), Giovanni Bonaventura as Hortensio (Cinderella on Broadway), Robert Hannon Davis as Ralph (A Christmas Carol—A Ghost Story of Christmas at Hartford Stage), Charity Angel Dawson as Hattie (Side Show on Broadway), Tyler Hanes as Bill/Lucentio (A Chorus Line on Broadway), James T. Lane as Paul (The Scottsboro Boys on Broadway), Barrett Martin as Gremio (Side Show on Broadway), Robin Masella as a Dancer (Chicago national tour), Shina Ann Morris as a Dancer (Cinderella on Broadway), Jane Papageorge as a Dancer (Hair at the Hollywood Bowl), Wayne W. Pretlow as Pops/Priest (The Most Happy Fella at City Center Encores!), Megan Sikora as Lois/Bianca (Curtains on Broadway), Michael Starr as Phillip (Guys and Dolls in L.A.), Jeff Steitzer as Harry Trevor/Baptista Minola (The Front Page at Long Wharf Theatre), Johnny Stellard as Nathaniel (Evita on Broadway), and Nick Wyman as General Harrison Howell (original cast of The Phantom of the Opera).

The creative team also includes Kris Kukul (Music Director), Alexander Dodge (Scenic Design), Fabio Toblini (Costume Design), Philip S. Rosenberg (Lighting Design), Jonathan Deans (Sound Design), Binder Casting (Casting), and Anjee Nero (Production Stage Manager).

Kiss Me, Kate is one of the great musicals, full of charm, wit, and fun,” said Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “I can’t think of a more entertaining show to place at the center of our celebratory Summer Season, and I can’t think of a better director than my friend and colleague Darko Tresnjak to helm it. I’m looking forward to every second.”

To learn more, click here!


"Hello, Gorgeous!" Due to Ticket Demand, BUYER & CELLAR, Is Now Extended Through SUNDAY, MAY 10!

Ron Lagomarsino (left) directs David Turner (right) in Jonathan Tolins's Buyer & Cellar, April 4 - May 10, 2015 at The Old Globe. Photo by Jim Cox.

(April 2, 2015)—The Old Globe today announced that due to ticket demand, the hilarious Buyer & Cellar, which starts previews this Saturday, April 4, will now play through Sunday, May 10! Broadway veteran David Turner (On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, Arcadia, Sunday in the Park with George) will star in Jonathan Tolins’s (The Twilight of the Golds) acclaimed Off Broadway hit, directed by Ron Lagomarsino (The Last Night of Ballyhoo, My Favorite Year, “Homefront,” “Ravenswood”). The one-man, tour-de-force comedy, which continues the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration, will now run April 4 through May 10 in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Preview performances run April 4 through April 8. Opening night is Thursday, April 9 at 8:00 p.m. Single tickets for the extension week will go on sale Tuesday, April 7 at 12 noon. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

What’s a renowned diva to do with decades of memories that light the corners of her mind? And where to put the acres of memorabilia bursting the seams of her Malibu estate? If you’re Barbra Streisand, you enshrine them in a mini-mall in your basement where you can pretend to go shopping! Out-of-work actor Alex More can’t pass up the oddest of odd jobs—an offer to play shopkeeper for one tough customer who doesn’t let anyone rain on her parade. Soon it begins to take a toll on his patience, his love life, and his view of people (who need people). Jonathan Tolins’s “totally fictional” Off Broadway hit will have you rolling in the aisles and realizing why The New York Times called it “seriously funny – a remarkably sustained slice of absurdist whimsy,” and the New York Daily News declared, “This play deserves a hearty ‘Hello, gorgeous!’”

David Turner stars as Alex More. Turner recently starred in the Broadway revival of On a Clear Day You Can See Forever alongside Harry Connick Jr. and Jessie Mueller. His other Broadway credits include Arcadia, Sunday in the Park with George, The Ritz, In My Life, and The Invention of Love, the latter of which was directed by Old Globe Artistic Director Emeritus Jack O’Brien. His Off Broadway credits include As You Like It, directed by Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein and starring Gwyneth Paltrow, as well as The Last Sunday in June (also by Jonathan Tolins), The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged), The Butter and Egg Man, Gutenberg! The Musical!, and most recently The Good Person of Szechwan at The Public Theater. Among Turner’s television appearances are “Lipstick Jungle,” “The Good Wife,” and HBO’s “The Leftovers.” He is the recipient of two Helen Hayes Award nominations and BMI’s prestigious Jerry Harrington Musical Theater Award for songwriting.

The creative team for Buyer & Cellar includes Erik Flatmo (Scenic Design), Charlotte Devaux (Costume Design), Philip S. Rosenberg (Lighting Design), Lindsay Jones (Original Music and Sound Design), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Jess Slocum (Production Stage Manager).


The Globe's Artistic Director Barry Edelstein will offer an Encore Presentation of Thinking Shakespeare Live! on Saturday, June 6 at 11:00 a.m.

Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein leads Thinking Shakespeare Live! on June 15, 2013. Photo by Douglas Gates.

 

April 1, 2015—Following successful showings in the past two seasons, The Old Globe will offer an encore presentation of Thinking Shakespeare Live!, a 90-minute exploration of the language of Shakespeare, on Saturday, June 6 at 11:00 a.m. Led by Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein and assisted by three professional classical actors, this special program based on Edelstein's book, Thinking Shakespeare: A How-To Guide for Student Actors, Directors, and Anyone Else Who Wants to Feel More Comfortable with the Bard, reveals a performer's approach to Shakespearean language so audiences may easily understand the poetry of the Bard. An ideal introduction to Shakespeare for families and young audiences, Thinking Shakespeare Live! will take place on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe's Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Tickets are currently available to donors and subscribers only and will go on sale to the public on Friday, April 24 at 12 noon. Tickets are $10 for subscribers and full-time students and $15 for general audiences and can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

"San Diego's Shakespeare audience is devoted to the Bard, and the Globe, one of the country's great Shakespeare theatres, always looks for innovative ways to serve it," said Edelstein. "We created Thinking Shakespeare Live! to help our audience have fun while making new connections to Shakespeare, and we are pleased to bring it back this summer and make it a regular part of our program."

Coinciding with The Old Globe's 2015 Shakespeare Festival, and continuing the Globe's 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration, Thinking Shakespeare Live! is a fast-paced, funny and altogether fascinating guide to the language of the Bard. In this lively 90-minute program, Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein, called by NPR "one of the country's leading Shakespeareans," provides audiences a unique opportunity to learn the methods he imparts to professional actors in the rehearsal room. As Edelstein and three skilled actors demonstrate these techniques live on stage, this entertaining behind-the-scenes look at the creative process offers a primer on the tools used to hear and understand Shakespeare. With humor and insight, Thinking Shakespeare Live! brings audiences into the intoxicating world of the Bard and shows how his masterful poetry can come to life for everyone.

To learn more, click here!


The Old Globe will present reading of THE REVISIONIST for Holocaust Remembrance Day

Part of the National Jewish Theater Foundation's (NJTF) Remembrance Readings in honor of Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah)

March 31, 2015—Struck with a terrible case of writer's block, American novelist David reaches out to his 75-year-old, distant cousin Maria in Poland, hoping to find a quiet place to write and a little bit of inspiration abroad. But when David arrives in Maria's tiny apartment, she bombards him with her desperate need to connect to her newly met relative. As tensions grow between them, Maria reveals details about her life during World War II and her experiences in the Holocaust. Soon David gains more than inspiration: he gains a family. Jesse Eisenberg's moving new play explores kinship, identity, and the impact on a family of a long-ago trauma.

A Free Reading

"The Globe is honored to commemorate a tragedy by joining our sister theatres around San Diego in this special series of Holocaust Remembrance Day Readings," said Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. "We believe that the theatre has a unique ability to help us process events and experiences that defy understanding. This ability is demonstrated by Jesse Eisenberg's The Revisionist, a play that explores, through empathy, compassion, and surprising humor, the human dimensions of historical trauma. We look forward to sharing it with the community."

On April 13, 2015 various theatres, cultural organizations, and memorial institutions across the country will unite to honor victims of the Holocaust by joining in Remembrance Readings for Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah). This inaugural event is led by theatres from San Diego, with The Old Globe, La Jolla Playhouse, North Coast Repertory Theatre, San Diego Repertory Theatre, and Lamb's Players Theatre already participating. These organizations and others around the nation will organize staged readings with a play of their choosing. Each reading will be followed by a discussion with audience members about the lessons of the Holocaust and the relevance of those lessons in today's world.

To learn more about this special event:
Click here for ticketing information.
Click here to read the press release.
Click here to visit the NJTF Remembrance Readings website.


 

Review: 'The White Snake' at Old Globe is a sprightly fable of attraction

Matt DeCaro (center) with the cast of the Goodman Theatre production of The White Snake. Photo by Liz Lauren.

By Charles McNulty

 

March 30, 2015—God reputedly made the world in seven days, but that seems lazy by Mary Zimmerman's standards. She needs only a few seconds and some billowing fabric to conjure the four elements of classical mythology onto a bare stage.

Zimmerman won a Tony Award for her shape-shifting direction of "Metamorphoses," and her current offering, "The White Snake" — a sprightly theatricalization of an ancient Chinese fable, now at the Old Globe — gives her another opportunity to exercise her marvelous transformational artistry.

The tale, which Zimmerman adapted herself, relates the story of two very learned snakes cloistered on a mountaintop for centuries. Bored by the rigors of their meditative life and the pursuit of transcendence, they begin to imagine the world occupied by those sensual two-legged creatures below who get to enjoy all that "music and fine food and wine," to say nothing of romance.

Green Snake (Tanya Thai McBride), the more impetuous of the two, talks White Snake (Amy Kim Waschke), the more spiritually evolved, into taking a one-day furlough. But time is a slippery business for reptiles that never seem to grow old.

Once transformed into a beautiful woman, White Snake falls in love with Xu Xian (Jon Norman Schneider), a man of humble origins who shows her kindness. This prompts a change in plans: A house in the village is found — the mountaintop can wait.

Green Snake, transfigured into White Snake's game-for-anything lady-in-waiting, employs her not exactly subtle powers of persuasion to get her mistress and Xu Xian married on the spot. She also secures funds, operating with snakelike slyness here, so that they can open a pharmacy to provide employment for the groom.

This business, aided by White Snake's vast learning and witchery, brings the couple a good deal of public attention — and with it some trouble. Fa Hai, a jealous monk (humorously played by Matt DeCaro as a kind of holy-roller good ol' boy), suspects White Snake of being a demon in disguise. He's determined to put an end to Xu Xian's marriage and eradicate this trumped-up threat to "Buddha's Country."

Zimmerman's cast members take turns serving as narrators, fast-forwarding the dramatized story and calling attention to variants of the tale. Lightly philosophical, "The White Snake" meditates on the way love challenges us to accept not only the reality of another person but also the imperfections of ourselves in a world in which no pleasure is eternal, no happiness impervious to change.

The production is set aloft by Andre Pluess' original music, performed by a small pit orchestra costumed in the jaunty manner of a Renaissance fair. The music, at once Eastern and Western, antique and modern, creates a universe locatable only in the realm of fiction.

The scenography is beautiful but never attention-grabbing for its own stake. Snake tails poke through dresses, tidal waves arrive with furious silks. Zimmerman's dreamy art is one of subtraction, and Daniel Ostling's scenic design, T.J. Gerckens' lighting and Mara Blumenfeld's costumes are coordinated to entice fantasy rather than to substitute for it.

There's a populist quality to "The White Snake," which wants to delight spectators both visually and aurally without placing too many demands on them. The acting is accessible, never austere. Clownishness is welcome.

The bond between Waschke's White Snake and McBride's Green Snake evokes not just the master-servant relationship of classic stage comedy but also the madcap rapport of such female buddy sitcoms as "I Love Lucy" and "Laverne & Shirley." Schneider's Xu Xian is the archetypal underdog whose essential goodness keeps him safe despite his clumsiness in a treacherous universe.

Entertainment — that sometimes forgotten old value — is the name of the game.

This is not the approach that Robert Wilson, another purveyor of magnificent theatrical images, would likely have taken with this tale. Wilson's imagery at its best forces us into a new relationship to time, revoking old patterns of seeing and demanding a shift in consciousness.

Both aesthetics have their validity. Zimmerman, to her fable-loving credit, intermixes the sunshiny amusement with a sufficient number of truth-bearing storm clouds. If "The White Snake" is ultimately evanescent in its impact, it is still a pleasure to experience in the moment. The collective smile of happy theatergoers is nothing to sneeze at.

You can see the orginal article here.




Old Globe's 'Snake' unwinds with wit

Review: Adaptation of Chinese fable is an eye-catching saga of love and loss
By James Hebert


(from left) Vin Kridakorn, Amy Kim Waschke, Jon Norman Schneider, and Lisa Tejero in the Goodman Theatre production of The White Snake. Photo by Liz Lauren.

March 30, 2015—Snakes have had a PR problem at least since that little episode in the Garden of Eden. (And yet somehow apples always get a pass.)

The Chinese, though, seem to regard the creatures with a good deal more ambivalence and even admiration than Westerners typically can muster.

In "The White Snake," now getting a gently witty and affecting Southern California premiere at the Old Globe, serpents slither in bearing not just magic and delight but messages of tolerance and harmony.

One of the two reptilian heroines at story's center — a wisecracking sidekick played to comic perfection by Tanya Thai McBride — is almost cuddly, for snake's sake. And as portrayed by Amy Kim Waschke, the play's title character is a figure of regal beauty and grace.

A couple of important things to note here: The snakes in the play, which the director Mary Zimmerman adapted from an ancient Chinese fable, are as much spirit as actual serpent (each is many centuries old).

And for most of this visually striking show, they live in the form of young women, having become transmogrified on their mystical journey to the human world.

Zimmerman, a Tony Award-winner in 2002 for the Greek myth-based "Metamorphoses," has a playful way of weaving traditional Chinese dramatic structure and the many iterations of the original fable into the piece, which premiered at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in 2012.

Various narrators step in to note how versions of the legend have diverged over the millennia; at other moments, we get quick lessons in "Secrets of the Chinese Drama," as exasperated characters strive to make precise hand gestures and strike proper poses.

Through it all courses Andre Pluess' original music, an understated but compelling blend of Western and Asian instrumentation and harmonics, performed by a small, fully costumed ensemble in the orchestra pit.

The story opens with a simple benediction: "Believe me." And there begins an adventure.

White Snake (Waschke) has been slumbering for untold ages in a mountain cave, but awakens determined to learn what's outside.

"She could have kept sleeping, as many of us do," we're told; instead, White Snake studies the Tao for the next 1,700 years. Finally, when Green Snake (McBride), her excitable acolyte, proposes they go down the mountain and into the human world, she agrees.

There, they meet the shy young pharmacist's assistant, Xu Xian (a disarming and appealing Jon Norman Schneider); the happily meddlesome "Greenie" sets them up to marry, and soon the two are running their own pharmacy in domestic bliss, although Xu Xian has nagging questions about his wife's true nature.

A fatuous monk named Fa Hai (in a winningly rich comic performance by Matt DeCaro) plays on those concerns as he becomes obsessed with unmasking White Snake. (A favorite moment comes when Fa Hai bleats, "This is Buddhist country!," in a self-satisfied Texas twang.)

He and White Snake eventually summon dueling spirits for a supernatural battle depicted vividly through Shawn Sagady's undulating projections and T.J. Gerckens' exceptionally dynamic lighting, on Daniel Ostling's spare set.

Mara Blumenfeld's inventive costumes provide wows throughout: White Snake's elongated body is depicted early on via a line of bobbing, umbrella-wielding actors, while McBride deftly manipulates a puppet version of Green Snake. (Her wonderfully expressive, chirpy voice is a character all its own.)

If the show's humor occasionally can drift toward Disney-esque cuteness (paging Timon and Puumba), Zimmerman's poetic sense goes a long way toward lending the piece both lyricism and gravity.

It's a serpentine saga that, in the end, uncoils with considerable wisdom.

You can see the orginal article here.


"Hello, Gorgeous!" Broadway Veteran David Turner Will Star in Jonathan Tolins's 'Totally Fictional' Award-Winning Off Broadway Hit Comedy Buyer & Cellar!

David Turner stars as Alex More in Jonathan Tolins's Buyer & Cellar, directed by Ron Lagomarsino, April 4 - May 3, 2015 at The Old Globe. Photo by Jim Cox.

March 16, 2015—The Old Globe today announced that Broadway veteran David Turner (On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, Arcadia, Sunday in the Park with George) will star in Jonathan Tolins’s (The Twilight of the Golds) acclaimed Off Broadway hit Buyer & Cellar, directed by Ron Lagomarsino (The Last Night of Ballyhoo, My Favorite Year, “Homefront,” “Ravenswood”). The one-man, tour-de-force comedy, which continues the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration, will run April 4 through May 3 in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Preview performances run April 4 through April 8. Opening night is Thursday, April 9 at 8:00 p.m. Single tickets are currently on sale and can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

What’s a renowned diva to do with decades of memories that light the corners of her mind? And where to put the acres of memorabilia bursting the seams of her Malibu estate? If you’re Barbra Streisand, you enshrine them in a mini-mall in your basement where you can pretend to go shopping! Out-of-work actor Alex More can’t pass up the oddest of odd jobs—an offer to play shopkeeper for one tough customer who doesn’t let anyone rain on her parade. Soon it begins to take a toll on his patience, his love life, and his view of people (who need people). Jonathan Tolins’s “totally fictional” Off Broadway hit will have you rolling in the aisles and realizing why The New York Times called it “seriously funny – a remarkably sustained slice of absurdist whimsy,” and the New York Daily News declared, “This play deserves a hearty ‘Hello, gorgeous!’”

David Turner stars as Alex More. Turner recently starred in the Broadway revival of On a Clear Day You Can See Forever alongside Harry Connick Jr. and Jessie Mueller. His other Broadway credits include Arcadia, Sunday in the Park with George, The Ritz, In My Life, and The Invention of Love, the latter of which was directed by Old Globe Artistic Director Emeritus Jack O’Brien. His Off Broadway credits include As You Like It, directed by Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein and starring Gwyneth Paltrow, as well as The Last Sunday in June (also by Jonathan Tolins), The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged), The Butter and Egg Man, Gutenberg! The Musical!, and most recently The Good Person of Szechwan at The Public Theater. Among Turner’s television appearances are “Lipstick Jungle,” “The Good Wife,” and HBO’s “The Leftovers.” He is the recipient of two Helen Hayes Award nominations and BMI’s prestigious Jerry Harrington Musical Theater Award for songwriting.

The creative team for Buyer & Cellar includes Erik Flatmo (Scenic Design), Charlotte Devaux (Costume Design), Philip S. Rosenberg (Lighting Design), Lindsay Jones (Original Music and Sound Design), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Jess Slocum (Production Stage Manager).

Buyer & Cellar is one of those wonderful plays that comes at you with a lot of laughs and then sneaks up on you with deep things to think about,” said Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “Jonathan Tolins is one of the funniest playwrights out there, and he just nails that crazy Los Angeles world where the struggling actors and the movie stars—the Queen Bees and the wannabes—somehow mingle side by side. His play makes us reconsider the distance between superstar and nobody, and he spins a wildly inventive and surprisingly sweet yarn along the way. The brilliant Ron Lagomarsino navigates this daffy piece with great skill, and David Turner finds every nuance, from the biggest belly laugh to the most tender heartbreak. This is a special one, and I’m looking forward to seeing San Diego embrace it.”

To learn more, click here!


Finding Humor in Tragedy with the Globe's The Twenty-seventh Man


For the Globe's new production of The Twenty-seventh Man, playwright Nathan Englander found inspiration in an incident known as the Night of the Murdered Poets that took place under Stalin's regime. KPBS arts reporter Beth Accomando says the play finds a surprising humor within the tragedy.


San Diego's THE OLD GLOBE and the SAN DIEGO PUBLIC LIBRARY to Host Shakespeare's First Folio Exhibition in 2016, First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, the National Exhibit's Only Visit to California!

Folger Shakespeare Library Announces 52 Host Sites Across the Country for Traveling Exhibit to Mark the 400th Anniversary of Shakespeare's Death

Title page with Droeshout engraving of Shakespeare. Credit: Shakespeare First Folio, 1623. Folger Shakespeare Library.

Project Partners Include All Three of San Diego's Major Universities, KPBS Public Broadcasting, and the San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

February 25, 2015—THE OLD GLOBE, in partnership with the SAN DIEGO PUBLIC LIBRARY, has been selected as the host site for the state of California for First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, a national traveling exhibition of the Shakespeare First Folio, one of the world’s most treasured books. The Folger Shakespeare Library, in partnership with Cincinnati Museum Center and the American Library Association, is touring a First Folio of Shakespeare in 2016 to all 50 states, Washington, DC, and Puerto Rico.

“The Old Globe is bursting with pride that the only California stop on the national tour of First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare will be in San Diego,” said Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “This volume is one of the most important ever published, and the plays printed in it—the plays that are the lifeblood of The Old Globe—are cornerstones of our language, our worldview, and our very humanity. That we will be able to give San Diegans—and all Californians—a chance to view firsthand the pages on which those plays first appeared is an excitement and an honor.” Edelstein continued, “Together with the San Diego Public Library, we brought together a coalition of great institutions that demonstrates just how rich and deep are the arts and culture in San Diego. We are grateful to all of our partner institutions and thrilled that the tour’s organizers recognized the vitality of this group and the impact on our region of the work we do. I look forward to announcing soon the variety of wonderful programming the Globe and our partners will present before, during, and after the tour visits us.”

“The San Diego Public Library is thrilled to be partnering with The Old Globe, one of the most esteemed regional theaters in the nation, and other institutions to bring First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare to San Diego,” said San Diego Public Library Director Misty Jones. “This partnership is the true meaning of collaboration. By leveraging our resources and working with each other, we not only will be providing access to view one of the most important documents ever published but also sharing the spirit of Shakespeare with all San Diegans and Californians.”

The First Folio is the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s plays. It was published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare’s death. It contains 36 plays, half of which had not been published during Shakespeare’s lifetime and would have been lost if not for the First Folio. Two of Shakespeare’s fellow actors compiled the volume, hoping to preserve their friend’s work for future generations. They gave us definitive versions of the entire Shakespeare canon, and they saved such masterworks as Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, Antony and Cleopatra, The Comedy of Errors, and As You Like It from oblivion by publishing them for the first time in the First Folio.

“The First Folio is the book that gave us Shakespeare. Between its covers we discover his most famous characters—Hamlet, Desdemona, Cordelia, Macbeth, Romeo, Juliet, and hundreds of others—speaking words that continue to move and inspire us,” said Michael Witmore, Director of the Folger Shakespeare Library. “Shakespeare tells the human story like no one else. He connects us to each other, to our history, and to themes and ideas that touch us every day. We are delighted that we can share this precious resource with people everywhere, from San Diego, California to Gurabo, Puerto Rico, from Eugene, Oregon to Duluth, Minnesota.”

The Folger Shakespeare Library holds 82 copies of the First Folio, by far the largest collection in the world and more than a third of the 233 known copies in the world today. It is believed that 750 copies were originally printed.

The Shakespeare First Folio is one of the most valuable printed books in the world; a First Folio sold for $6.2 million in 2001 at Christie’s and another one for $5.2 million in 2006 in London. It originally sold for one British pound (20 shillings)—about $200 today.

When the First Folio arrives in San Diego, California, its pages will be opened to the most quoted line from Shakespeare and one of the most quoted lines in the world, “To be or not to be,” from Hamlet. Accompanying the rare book will be a multi-panel exhibition exploring the significance of Shakespeare, then and now, with additional digital content and interactive activities.

The exhibition will be presented to San Diego by The Old Globe and the volume will be hosted here at The Central Library @ Joan Λ Irwin Jacobs Common. Prior to, during, and after the exhibition, The Old Globe, the San Diego Public Library, and their many project partners will offer numerous public programs for adults and families.

First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare will enrich the cultural life of San Diego, with an emphasis on reaching underserved communities, by cultivating appreciation for the richness of thought about Shakespeare in our city; demonstrating the impact and influence Shakespeare has had on our region and American culture at large; and providing meaningful and memorable encounters with Shakespeare’s plays in order to enhance understanding of the First Folio’s history and relevance as an iconic cultural object.

Final touring dates for First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare will be announced in April 2015.

First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, and by the generous support of Vinton and Sigrid Cerf and the Google Inc. Charitable Giving Fund of Tides Foundation. Sponsorship opportunities of this major exhibition and the Folger’s other Wonder of Will programs commemorating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death are available; learn more at www.folger.edu.

About The Old Globe
The Tony Award-winning Old Globe is one of the country’s leading professional regional theatres and has stood as San Diego’s flagship arts institution for over 75 years. Under the leadership of Artistic Director Barry Edelstein and Managing Director Michael G. Murphy, The Old Globe produces a year-round season of 14 productions of classic, contemporary, and new works on its three Balboa Park stages: the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the 600-seat Old Globe Theatre and the 250-seat Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, both part of The Old Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center, and the 605-seat outdoor Lowell Davies Festival Theatre, home of its internationally renowned Shakespeare Festival. More than 250,000 people attend Globe productions annually and participate in the theatre’s education and community programs. Numerous world premieres such as 2014 Tony Award winner for Best Musical, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, The Full Monty, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, A Catered Affair, and the annual holiday musical Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! have been developed at The Old Globe and have gone on to enjoy highly successful runs on Broadway and at regional theatres across the country. For more information, visit www.theoldglobe.org.

About The San Diego Public Library
San Diego Public Library, which is the largest library system in the region, serves a population of more than 1.3 million people. Its mission is to inspire lifelong learning through connections to knowledge and each other. Learn about other events at the San Diego Central Library @ Joan Λ Irwin Jacobs Common and 35 community branch libraries, find links to numerous additional resources, or search for materials in the Library’s online catalog at www.sandiegolibrary.org.

About Folger Shakespeare Library
Folger Shakespeare Library is a world-renowned center for scholarship, learning, culture, and the arts. It is home to the world’s largest Shakespeare collection and a primary repository for rare materials from the early modern period (1500-1750). The Folger is an internationally recognized research library offering advanced scholarly programs in the humanities; an innovator in the preservation of rare materials; a national leader in how Shakespeare is taught in grades K–12; and an award-winning producer of cultural and arts programs—theatre, music, poetry, exhibits, lectures, and family programs. Learn more at www.folger.edu.

About Cincinnati Museum Center
Cincinnati Museum Center (CMC) at Union Terminal is a nationally recognized institution and national historic landmark. Dedicated to sparking community dialogue, insight, and inspiration, CMC was awarded the 2009 National Medal for Museum and Library Service from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and received accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums in 2012. CMC is one of only 16 museums in the nation with both of these honors, making it a unique asset and a vital community resource. Union Terminal has been voted the nation's 45th-most important building by the American Institute of Architects. Organizations within CMC include the Cincinnati History Museum, Duke Energy Children's Museum, Museum of Natural History & Science, Robert D. Lindner Family OMNIMAX® Theater, and Cincinnati History Library & Archives. Recognized by Forbes Traveler Magazine as the 17th-most visited museum in the country, CMC welcomes more than one million visitors annually. For more information, visit www.cincymuseum.org.

About the American Library Association
The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 58,000 members in academic, public, school, government, and special libraries. The mission of the American Library Association is to provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.

ALA’s Public Programs Office provides leadership, resources, training, and networking opportunities that help thousands of librarians nationwide develop and host cultural programs for adult, young adult, and family audiences. The mission of the ALA Public Programs Office is to promote cultural programming as an essential part of library service in all types of libraries. Projects include book and film discussion series, literary and cultural programs featuring authors and artists, professional development opportunities, and traveling exhibitions. School, public, academic, and special libraries nationwide benefit from the office’s programming initiatives. Additional information can be found at www.ala.org/programming.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities
Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at www.neh.gov.

To learn more, click here!

THE OLD GLOBE 80TH ANNIVERSARY Celebration Continues with the SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PREMIERE of the Enchanting Theatrical Spectacle THE WHITE SNAKE, Written and Directed by MARY ZIMMERMAN, Running March 21 through April 26, 2015

Amy Kim Waschke and Jon Norman Schneider in the Goodman Theatre production of The White Snake. The Old Globe's production of The White Snake, written and directed by Mary Zimmerman, runs March 21 - April 26, 2015. Photo by Liz Lauren.

 

February 25, 2015—The Old Globe is delighted to welcome one of the true geniuses of the American theatre, Tony Award winner Mary Zimmerman, who makes her long-awaited San Diego directing debut with an enchanting theatrical spectacle with live music and sumptuous visuals, The White Snake, continuing the Globe’s 80th Anniversary festivities as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration. The Southern California Premiere of The White Snake, written and directed by Zimmerman, will run March 21 through April 26 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Preview performances run March 21 through 25. Opening night is Thursday, March 26 at 8:00 p.m. Single tickets are currently on sale. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

In this visionary staging of a classic Chinese fable, a gentle serpent transforms into a beautiful woman. She falls in love with a dashing young man and decides to stay human forever, until a wicked monk discovers her true identity and vows to destroy her. The White Snake is an unforgettable theatrical event for all ages that NPR called “strikingly beautiful.” The New York Times proclaimed that Zimmerman “creates richly imagistic works – her eye refines and refinishes, drawing ever-sharper pictures from the texts she theatricalizes.” This nearly 2,000 year-old Chinese fable has been reimagined throughout the centuries and appears in the legends of many cultures.

Amy Kim Waschke plays the White Snake, Tanya Thai McBride is her loyal friend the Green Snake, Jon Norman Schneider her suitor Xu Xian, and Matt DeCaro her nemesis Fa Hai. The ensemble also includes Dan Lin (Boatman), Stephenie Soohyun Park (Guan Yin), Eliza Shin (Acolyte), Shannon Tyo (Crane), Kristin Villanueva (Sister), Gary Wingert (Canopus), and Wai Yim (Brother-in-Law); with musicians Tessa Brinckman (Flutes), Ronnie Malley (Strings/Percussion), and Michal Palzewicz (Cello).

The creative team includes Daniel Ostling (Scenic Design), Mara Blumenfeld (Costume Design), T.J. Gerckens (Lighting Design), Andre Pluess (Sound Design and Original Music), Shawn Sagady (Projection Design), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Leila Knox (Production Stage Manager).

“Mary Zimmerman is an American original whose theatrical vision is fresh, vivid, and very exciting,” said Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “The Old Globe is delighted to welcome her to San Diego for the first time, and I am thrilled to share with local audiences her distinctive and striking theatrical style. The White Snake is simply breathtaking, a work that’s both ancient and modern, both classic and cutting-edge. It is as heartfelt and moving as it is visually and aurally ravishing. I know it will galvanize San Diego.”

Mary Zimmerman (Playwright, Director) is the 1998 recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, the 2002 Tony Award for Best Director of a Play, and many Joseph Jefferson Awards, including Best Production and Best Director. She is a member of Lookingglass Theatre Company in Chicago, an Artistic Associate of the Goodman Theatre, and a Professor of Performance Studies at Northwestern University. Works that she has adapted and directed include The Jungle Book (Goodman, Huntington Theatre Company), The White Snake (Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Berkeley Repertory, Goodman, and McCarter Theatres), Argonautika (Lookingglass, Berkeley Rep, The Shakespeare Theatre Company, McCarter), Candide (Goodman, Shakespeare Theatre Company, Huntington Theatre Company), Mirror of the Invisible World (Goodman), The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci (Goodman, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Seattle Rep, Second Stage Theatre), The Odyssey (Lookingglass, Goodman, McCarter, Seattle Rep), Arabian Nights (Lookingglass, Manhattan Theatre Club, BAM, Berkeley Rep, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Arena Stage), Journey to the West (Goodman, Huntington, Berkeley Rep), Metamorphoses (Lookingglass, Seattle Rep, Berkeley Rep, Mark Taper Forum, Second Stage, on Broadway at Circle in the Square), Secret in the Wings (Lookingglass, Berkeley Rep, McCarter, Seattle Rep), Eleven Rooms of Proust (Lookingglass, About Face Theatre), and a new opera with Philip Glass called Galileo Galilei (Goodman, Barbican in London, BAM). For the Metropolitan Opera she has directed Lucia di Lammermoor, Armida, and La Sonnambula, all of which have been broadcast live worldwide. She recently debuted her Lucia at La Scala in Milan.

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The Old Globe will present Barry Edelstein In Conversation with Carey Perloff, Artistic Director of American Conservatory Theater, on Sunday, March 15 at 4:00 p.m.

American Conservatory Theater Artistic Director Carer Perloff. Photo by Kevin Berne.

The Two Artistic Leaders Will Discuss the Future of American Regional Theatre and Perloff's Memoir, Beautiful Chaos: A Life in the Theater

February 24, 2015—The Old Globe will present a one-night-only free event, Barry Edelstein In Conversation with Carey Perloff, on Sunday, March 15 at 4:00 p.m. This special discussion between Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein and Artistic Director of the legendary American Conservatory Theater Carey Perloff will explore the state of American theatre and the future of the country’s regional theatres, as well as Perloff’s new memoir about her personal and professional journey in the arts, Beautiful Chaos: A Life in the Theater. After the presentation, Perloff will also sign copies of the book, which will be available for purchase at the event.

Barry Edelstein In Conversation with Carey Perloff will take place in Hattox Hall, part of the Karen and Donald Cohn Education Center on the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. This special presentation is free to the public, though reservations are recommended to guarantee a seat. Reservations can be made by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

“More than a cherished friend of two decades, Carey Perloff is an inspiration to me,” said Edelstein. “When I took over Classic Stage Company I worked hard to emulate her successes there, and when I took over the Globe, I phoned her desk at A.C.T. in search of advice. She is a national leader in the American theatre, an artist of nuance and insight, and a warm, funny, and humane spirit. She’s also a very gifted writer, and I look forward to sharing her wonderful new memoir with San Diego.”

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Tragic The Twenty-Seventh Man brings power of the pen to bear.

Robert Dorfman, left, as Vasily Korinsky and James Shanklin as Agent in Charge in the West Coast premiere of Nathan Englander's The Twenty-Seventh Man. (Jim Cox)


By Charles McNulty

Nathan Englander's short story, "The Twenty-Seventh Man," from his debut collection, "For the Relief of Unbearable Urges," is so impeccably pulled off, so beautifully composed in the spirit of the great Yiddish writers it depicts that the notion of adapting it to the stage seemed a foolhardy gamble. Why theatricalize a work that achieves its excellence through the short story virtues of modesty, compression and understatement? Barry Edelstein's stunning production of Englander's dramatization of "The Twenty-Seventh Man" at the Old Globe answers this question with poignant intelligence and grace.

Seeing the play, which Edelstein directed at the Public Theater in New York in 2012, is a different experience than reading the story. Some of the scenes match up, while others are newly invented. But the important point is that these two entities, while related, aren't dependent on each other. Performed by a six-actor ensemble that includes veteran Hal Linden and relative newcomer Eli Gelb in an emotionally resonant turn, the stage version stands on its own merits. The script may be over-explicit at moments, and it takes time to adjust to characters written as larger-than-life figures in a tale that, though inspired by history, proceeds with a fable-like disregard for realism. But the piece pays haunting tribute to a literary world snuffed out by the Soviets and extends Englander's meditation on writers and conscience and the way poetry survives even when poets are mercilessly being wiped out.

The play's context, sadly, isn't fabricated. After allowing Yiddish writers and intellectuals to thrive in the Soviet Union, Stalin grew paranoid and decided that Soviet Jews posed a danger to his regime.

On what has come to be called "The Night of the Murdered Poets," Stalin had sentenced to death a group of Soviet Jewish intellectuals in a purge that had the effect of silencing, in the program's words, "a Yiddish literary and artistic culture unparalleled at the time anywhere in the world."

Rebecca Gilman's latest drama centers on the custody dispute of a baby taken from young meth-addicted parents, a situation the playwright uses to paint a portrait of contemporary America in which everyone is chasing an elusive miracle.

Set in 1952, Englander's play takes license in imagining this chilling story, which here begins in the prison cell where four of 27 writers are being held. There were originally supposed to be 26, but another name was mysteriously added at the last minute.

It is the identity of this unknown figure, a young scribbler named Pinchas Pelovits (Gelb), that confounds the illustrious group. His lack of fame suggests that he may have been swept up by accident, yet as someone who'd rather have books than shoes and paper than nourishment, there's no mistaking him for anything but a writer of the purest kind. Vasily Korinsky (Robert Dorfman), a slick Stalin apologist, believes that he too has been erroneously imprisoned. He's waiting for a reprieve from Stalin and argues bitterly with his fellow inmates when they try to explain that it's his Jewish background and not his politics that has ensnared him in this net.

The other two writers could hardly be more temperamentally different. Pulled from a whorehouse in a drunken stupor, Moishe Bretzky (Ron Orbach) is a poet whose nickname "Der Glutton" understates his prodigious appetites. Yevgeny Zunser, known as Melman (Linden), is the self-effacing elder statesman of the group, a legend who has witnessed far too much atrocity to care anything about legendary status.

"Never outlive your language," he mournfully tells the others. "A curse."

Englander's story focuses on the interactions of the writers and their coming to terms with their hopeless situation. For the play, he adds a scene in which the Agent in Charge (James Shanklin) tries to persuade Korinsky to testify against Pinchas.

Structurally, this doesn't feel completely organic, but the scene allows us to reevaluate our assumptions about Korinsky, who is played by Dorfman with an exaggerated Jon Lovitz-like bray that seems less farfetched over time. More important, it underscores the unique bond these writers have with one another.

The production, which takes place on striking cage-like set by Michael McGarty that's magnificently lighted by Russell H. Champa, is dark and death-haunted. Brutality won't be beaten back — history happened.

But the play finds pockets of redemption in the tenderness these victims of totalitarian insanity bestow on one another. Melman may have borne the most as the eldest, but he's there to provide comfort to Pinchas after he's attacked by the guard (Lowell Byers). Bretzky, too, is willing to overlook his own bodily needs when he sees someone suffering more than he.

Linden and Orbach enter the world of this tale without a trace of sentimentality. Their characters have that objectivity that comes from a surfeit of painful experience, a quality that put me in mind of the razor-edged tales of Isaac Babel. My only complaint is that they and Dorfman's Korinsky are overburdened near the end with explanatory speechifying that is absent from the story and not needed here.

Resembling the kid brother of "Girls" actor Alex Karpovsky, Gelb's Pinchas is the heart of the production. With his acute sensitivity and artistic monomania, this fledgling writer who will perish before he's published but not before his talent is recognized represents more than just the potential poetry that was lost. He is the spirit behind the writing that, as Englander and Edelstein movingly demonstrate in their fruitful collaboration, tyranny cannot vanquish.

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The Old Globe Celebrates its 80th Anniversary during Balboa Park Centennial Celebration!

This yearlong Celebration includes The Old Globe's 2014-2015 Season and 2015 Summer Season, Outreach Programs, Education Offerings, and our Annual Fashion Show and Gala!

The grand entrance to The Old Globe. Photo courtesy of The Old Globe.

February 13, 2015—The Old Globe will celebrate its 80th Anniversary as part of the Balboa Park Centennial Celebration with a full roster of great plays in its regular season and a Summer Season featuring Shakespeare on stage and in film, along with our popular ongoing programs. Programming for the entire year of the Globe’s 80th Anniversary and the Centennial was carefully chosen to bring the party to the people year-round! San Diegans and tourists alike are invited to join us for amazing productions that are part of our Globe 2014-2015 Season and 2015 Summer Season, several outreach programs, education offerings—and what would an anniversary be without the Globe Guilders 25th Annual Celebrating Couture Fashion Show and our Annual Gala?

The 2014-2015 Season began September 13 with the World Premiere of Bright Star, a new American musical with music by Steve Martin and Edie Brickell, followed by Marco Ramirez’s wildly theatrical new play The Royale and our 17th annual production of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! But that was only the beginning of our celebration...

We moved into our 81st year with Globe veteran Scott Schwartz returning January 24 to direct Kellen Blair and Joe Kinosian’s Off Broadway hit, Murder for Two, a vaudevillian mystery musical with an energetic two-man cast. With The Twenty-seventh Man, Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein returns to the play he premiered in New York by award-winning novelist Nathan Englander and reimagines it for the Globe’s intimate in-the-round space, bringing us larger-than-life personalities and an unforgettable reminder of the transcendent power of storytelling. It makes its West Coast Premiere February 14. Learn more about the production and Edelstein’s experiences working on this amazing piece of theatre when the Globe presents Barry Edelstein In Conversation with Nathan Englander on February 18 at 6:00 p.m.

The Globe is delighted to welcome one of the true visionaries of the American theatre, Tony Award winner Mary Zimmerman, who makes her long-awaited San Diego directing debut beginning March 21 with an enchanting theatrical spectacle, The White Snake. Jonathan Tolins’s “totally fictional” Off Broadway hit, Buyer & Cellar, will have you rolling in the aisles. Yes, Barbra really does have a mall in her basement—what could it possibly be like to work there? Directed by Ron Lagomarsino, performances begin April 4.

In-demand director Jessica Stone, who recently made her Globe debut with Christopher Durang’s Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, will direct George Bernard Shaw’s Arms and the Man. Utterly romantic and one of the wittiest and most charming plays of the English stage, Arms and the Man mixes smarts and silliness in a wonderfully entertaining tale of love and war beginning May 9. Globe favorite James Vásquez (Dr. Seuss’ How The Grinch Stole Christmas!) will direct the West Coast premiere of an exciting new American play, Rich Girl, by acclaimed playwright Victoria Stewart, beginning May 23. Rich Girl, a modern retelling of the Henry James novel Washington Square and stage and screen classic The Heiress, is a moving and funny new play about mothers and daughters, love and money, and whether they can ever coexist.

Then it’s on to a summer of great Shakespeare and more! 2014 Tony Award winner for A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder and former Old Globe Shakespeare Festival Artistic Director Darko Tresnjak returns July 1 to direct the spectacular musical classic Kiss Me, Kate, with music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Sam and Bella Spewack, and choreography by Peggy Hickey, in association with Hartford Stage. Porter’s witty and high-spirited songs will transport you into the wings as a touring company gets ready to open a musical version of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, starring a divorced couple whose offstage battles threaten to bring down the curtain.

Director Rebecca Taichman, whose time-traveling Time and the Conways fascinated audiences last April, is back to direct Shakespeare’s delightful and romantic Twelfth Night, beginningJune 21. Six-time Tony Award nominee Scott Ellis, who has three shows on Broadway this season, will make his Globe directorial debut August 16 with Shakespeare’s hilarious The Comedy of Errors.

Rounding out the Summer Season on July 24 is the West Coast Premiere of the comedy Ken Ludwig’s Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, a wildly inventive adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mystery The Hound of the Baskervilles.

“As always, the Globe welcomes our country’s most exciting theatre artists to San Diego, and they are a spectacularly talented group,” said Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “Their work—and especially the abundance of laughter and light it brings—marks the Globe’s happy contribution to our city’s celebration of Balboa Park’s Centennial. I’m proud to note too that these productions will be surrounded by our full spectrum of humanities, outreach, education, and community efforts. All in all the Anniversary year will bring to our city a rich and wonderful program befitting the flagship arts institution of our region, and a season that demonstrates what a 21st-century American theatre can be.”

The Globe will also present a series of free Monday night film screenings of Shakespeare through the eras to celebrate both the Balboa Park Centennial and the theatre’s 80th Anniversary. On June 29, the Globe will present Henry V, directed by Laurence Olivier in 1944, in the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre. It will be followed by Orson Welles’s 1965 classic Chimes at Midnighton July 13 and Joss Whedon’s 2012 Much Ado About Nothingon August 3, both on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. The series will conclude on August 24 with Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins’s groundbreaking 1961 New York City riff on the Bard’s Romeo and Juliet, West Side Story, in the Festival Theatre.

The Old Globe will open its 2015-2016 Season with In Your Arms, a World Premiere dance-theatre musical featuring direction and choreography by Tony Award winner Christopher Gattelli and original music by Tony Award winner Stephen Flaherty. Co-conceived by Gattelli and Jennifer Manocherian, In Your Arms is a sweeping and romantic evening of theatre that will run September 16 – October 25 and will feature 10 dance vignettes telling wordless stories of love, yearning, and romance, constituting a magical evening of movement and music performed by a cast of 20 talented dancers. These vignettes are written by an incredible and diverse lineup of theatre powerhouses, including Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, and Alfred Uhry. This unprecedented constellation of America’s preeminent writers for the stage has amassed 14 Tony Awards, five Pulitzer Prizes, six Pulitzer finalist designations, and one Academy Award.

The 2015-2016 Season will also kick off in our in-the-round theatre with an exciting production to be announced soon.

This holiday season, everyone’s favorite Green Meanie will be back at the Globe! Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, a wonderful, whimsical musical based upon the classic Dr. Seuss book, returns on November 7 to delight San Diego families for its 18th incredible year. Once again directed by James Vásquez, The Grinch features book and lyrics by Timothy Mason and music by Mel Marvin. The original production of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! was conceived and directed by Jack O’Brien with Additional Lyrics by Theodor S. Geisel, Additional Music by Albert Hague, and original choreography by John DeLuca.

Don’t miss the surround events for each production—including Insights Seminars, Post-Show Forums, Subject Matters and Shakespeare in the Garden. Even kids can get in on the act and audition for our Summer Shakespeare Intensive and Middle School Conservatory, running during the summer. Join us for the Anniversary celebration at the Globe Guilders 25th Annual Celebrating Couture Fashion Show and our Annual Gala (and one more surprise party to be announced)! And our ongoing outreach programs, including Globe for All and New Voices Festival, continue, with details and dates to follow.

Murder for Two, The White Snake, Arms and the Man, Kiss Me, Kate, In Your Arms, and Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! will play on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre. The Twenty-seventh Man, Buyer & Cellar, Rich Girl, and Ken Ludwig’s Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery will run in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre. Both theatres are part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Twelfth Night and The Comedy of Errors will run in the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre.

“In 2015, San Diego marks the Centennial of the Panama-California Exposition and also the 80th Anniversary of The Old Globe. Both commemorations celebrate the vibrancy of Balboa Park, a place that defines this city as a cultural force to be reckoned with nationwide, and both deserve great festivities. The Globe has put together a full year of laughter, fun, and the most vivid theatricality we could muster,” said Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “Among the things we are proudest of, as leaders and custodians of The Old Globe, is the breadth of work this theatre produces. From Shakespeare to Sondheim, from world classics to world premieres, The Old Globe presents an unparalleled range of work as a part of its ongoing mission to serve the San Diego community it calls home. Summer will find the celebration in high gear as we present two of Shakespeare’s most crowd-pleasing plays outdoors, in productions by true luminaries of the American stage. Indoors we’ll welcome one of our closest friends to reimagine a classic musical with a Shakespeare connection of its own, and we’ll present the West Coast Premiere of a new stage adaptation of a beloved Sherlock Holmes mystery. Plus, as a special double-anniversary gift to San Diego, we’re going to throw our doors open for free screenings of four of the best Shakespeare films ever made. It’s going to be a yearlong party on our campus and a demonstration of all the wonders the Globe has brought our city for eight decades.”

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Into the Woods takes home a Craig Noel Award!

Emily Young and Noah Brody in Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's Into the Woods. Photo by Jim Cox.

The 13th Annual Craig Noel Awards, presented by the San Diego Theatre Critics Circle, were held on Monday, February 9. The Old Globe's production of Into the Woods won the award for Outstanding Touring Production. The show, brought to the Globe by Fiasco Theatre, was a wonderfully inventive version of the classic musical, which had its world premiere at The Old Globe 29 years ago.

The Craig Noel Awards, named after the Globe's Founding Director, honor excellence in San Diego theatre. We are so proud of Into the Woods and all of the amazing Globe productions that were recognized this year!

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Due to Ticket Demand, The West Coast Premiere of The Twenty-seventh Man Is Now Extended Through Sunday, March 22!

(from left) Robert Dorfman appears as Vasily Korinsky, Hal Linden as Yevgeny Zunser, Ron Orbach as Moishe Bretzky, and Eli Gelb as Pinchas Pelovits in the West Coast Premiere of Nathan Englander's The Twenty-seventh Man, directed by Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein, Feb. 14 - March 22, 2015 at The Old Globe. Photo by Jim Cox.

 

February 5, 2015—The Old Globe’s West Coast Premiere of The Twenty-seventh Manby award-winning novelist Nathan Englander, directed by Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein, will now play an extra week of performances—through March 22—due to ticket demand for the originally announced run. Tony and Emmy Award winner Hal Linden (“Barney Miller,” The Rothschilds) leads a cast of Broadway and Globe veterans including Ron Orbach, Robert Dorfman, Eli Gelb, James Shanklin, and Lowell Byers. The Twenty-seventh Man will run February 14 through March 22 in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Preview performances run February 14-18. Opening night is Thursday, February 19 at 8:00 p.m. Single tickets for the extension week are on sale now. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

In a Soviet prison in 1952, Stalin’s secret police have rounded up 26 writers, the giants of Yiddish literature in Russia. As judgment looms, a 27th suddenly appears: a teenager, unpublished and unknown. Baffled by his arrest, he and his cellmates wonder at what has brought them together and wrestle with what it means to write in troubled times. Time Out New York called The Twenty-seventh Man “exquisite – as chilling and haunted as a ghost story.” With The Twenty-seventh Man, Edelstein returns to the Englander play he premiered in New York and reimagines it for the Globe’s intimate in-the-round space, bringing us larger-than-life personalities and an unforgettable reminder of the transcendent power of storytelling.

Hal Linden will play Yiddish writer Yevgeny Zunser. A versatile Emmy and Tony Award-winning actor/singer/musician, Linden appeared on Broadway in Cabaret, The Gathering, The Sisters Rosensweig, and I’m Not Rappaport, Off Broadway in Visiting Mr. Green, and as Scrooge in A Christmas Carol at Madison Square Garden. The world recognizes him from the enormously popular television series “Barney Miller,” and he is a familiar face on television and in films including Out to Sea and A New Life.

The acting company also includes Lowell Byers (the Globe’s The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Othello,and Pericles, Prince of Tyre) as the Guard, Robert Dorfman (The Lion King and Social Security on Broadway, A Dybbuk and The Normal Heart at The Public) as Vasily Korinsky, Eli Gelb (Off Broadway’s The Thickness of Skin and Brighton Beach Memoirs) as Pinchas Pelovits, Ron Orbach (film Clueless, Chicago and Laughter on the 23rd Floor on Broadway) as Moishe Bretzky, and James Shanklin (“Hell on Wheels,” original Broadway company of Wit, Bethany at the Globe) as Agent in Charge.

The creative team includes Michael McGarty (Scenic Design), Katherine Roth (Costume Design), Russell H. Champa (Lighting Design), Darron L West (Sound Design), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Anjee Nero (Stage Manager).

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Allegiance is heading to Broadway!

Congratulations to George Takei and the team behind Allegiance! The show is set to open on Broadway later this year. The original production had its world premiere at The Old Globe in 2012.

George Takei as Ojii-san in the World Premiere of Allegiance - A New American Musical, with music and lyrics by Jay Kuo and book by Marc Acito, Kuo and Lorenzo Thione, directed by Stafford Arima. Photo by Henry DiRocco.


By Patrick Healy

February 5, 2015—Allegiance, a new musical about Japanese-Americans in United States internment camps during World War II, will begin performances on Broadway in October at a Shubert theater to be announced later, the show's producers said Thursday. The musical, which will cost a relatively hefty $13 million to mount, will star George Takei, who is best known as Mr. Sulu in the original "Star Trek" television series, and whose personal experiences in internment camps in Arkansas and California inspired Allegiance.

Mr. Takei, in a telephone interview, described the show as "very, very personal" and a tribute to his parents as well as the tens of thousands of people of Japanese ancestry - the majority of whom were American citizens - who were forcibly relocated to camps from 1942 to 1946 under an order by President Roosevelt. Mr. Takei said that he had invested a "substantial" amount of his own money in the musical, and that it features characters drawn from his family and life, including a grandfather character that Mr. Takei will portray in his Broadway debut.

"I consider this my legacy project," said Mr. Takei, who is 77 and spent about four years of his childhood in two camps. "This is the first time that this dark chapter of American history will be done on the Broadway stage."

Mindful that theatergoers often skip Broadway musicals that are tagged (however unfairly) as ruminations on history, like "The Scottsboro Boys" and "Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson," Mr. Takei highlighted the romantic subplots and centrality of baseball in Allegiance, as well as the overarching theme of family unity.

"The show's backdrop is the imprisonment of innocent Americans simply because we looked like the people who bombed Pearl Harbor, but the story is universal - people falling in love, getting married, having a family," Mr. Takei said. "The musical will find an audience because whether you are white, black, Latino, young or old, people can identify with the idea of family and the stresses put on a family, which in this case were enormous."

Allegiance had its world premiere in 2012 at the Old Globe Theater in San Diego, receiving mixed reviews but drawing large and ethnically diverse audiences. Since then, Mr. Takei said, some scenes and dialogue have been tweaked but the show is essentially the same. The Old Globe cast included the Tony Award winner Lea Salonga (Miss Saigon) and Telly Leung (the 2011 Broadway revival of Godspell). Mr. Takei said Ms. Salonga and Mr. Leung were in negotiations to do Allegiance on Broadway but no casting beyond his was confirmed at this point.

The musical's producers, Lorenzo Thione and Andrew Treagus, have been waiting for an available Broadway theater for about two years, but other shows - some more evidently commercial than Allegiance, and some flops - landed them first. Allegiance will arrive during a period of increasingly steady opportunities for Asian-American theater actors in New York: a Broadway revival of The King & I is set to open this spring, while the hit London revival of Miss Saigon looks likely to arrive on Broadway at some point, though probably not before the 2016-17 theater season.

Allegiance, which has a book by Marc Acito and music and lyrics by Jay Kuo, will be directed by Stafford Arima (Off Broadway's Carrie, Altar Boyz). Preview performances are scheduled to begin Oct. 6, with an opening night of Nov. 8.

The musical grew out of a chance encounter several years ago that Mr. Takei and his husband, Brad, had with Mr. Thione and Mr. Kuo at back-to-back theater outings in New York, after which Mr. Takei shared his childhood memories of the camps over dinner.

"We talked for a long time about my childhood imprisonment, about my father's anguish at being challenged over his loyalty to America - my dad was born in San Francisco and played baseball, my mother was born in Sacramento," Mr. Takei said. "I'm a weeper, and when Jay emailed me a song after that, about my father and the idea of allegiance, I just gushed. I knew I had to do this."

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The Old Globe holds Annual Meeting , Elects new board members for 2015 fiscal year.

 

(from left) Michael G. Murphy, Managing Director, and Barry Edelstein, Artistic Director. Photo by Doug Gates.

Febuary 3, 2015—The Old Globe’s Annual Meeting was held on Monday, February 2 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. After a reception in the Jane and Victor Ottenstein Lobby, Old Globe Board Chair Elaine Bennett Darwin welcomed the Board of Directors and guests and announced the newly elected Board members. Managing Director Michael G. Murphy gave an update on the Globe’s financial position and presented highlights of the 2014 fiscal year, and Artistic Director Barry Edelstein spoke about the artistic future of the Globe and its place in the San Diego community as the theatre celebrates its 80th Anniversary and the Centennial of Balboa Park’s Panama-California Exposition. The meeting was followed by a reception and dinner for the Board of Directors, Ambassadors, and Founders Level Donors at the Prado Ballroom in Balboa Park’s historic House of Hospitality.

It was announced that the 2015 Board of Directors’ Executive Committee will consist of Elaine Bennett Darwin (Chair), Vicki L. Zeiger (Incoming Chair), Peter J. Cooper (Vice Chair, Nominating), Ann Davies (Vice Chair, Education), Anthony S. Thornley (Treasurer), Harvey P. White (Secretary; Past Chair, Ex Officio), Mary Beth Adderley, Donald L. Cohn (Past Chair, Ex Officio), Valerie S. Cooper, Stephen P. Embry, Harold W. Fuson, Jr. (Past Chair, Ex Officio), Kathryn Hattox (Past Chair, Ex Officio), Paula Powers, Conrad Prebys, Ann Steck, and Karin Winner.

Darwin also announced that the following candidates identified by the Globe’s Nominating Committee were formally elected to serve three-year terms on the Board of Directors: Marla Black, Elizabeth Dewberry, Old Globe Associate Artist Robert Foxworth, Keven Lippert, Adam Ratner, and Karen Tanz. Current Board members who will begin new consecutive three-year terms in 2015 include Joseph J. Cohen, Silvija Devine, Sheila Lipinsky, Ramin Pourteymour, Sandra Redman, Steven J. Stuckey, Daniel L. Sullivan, Ph.D., Debra Turner, Pamela J. Wagner, and Lynne Wheeler. Board members Mitzi Lizárraga, David Reagan, Linda Van Vark (Immediate Past Globe Guilders President, Ex Officio), Debbie Wilson, and June Yoder, whose terms of service concluded at the end of 2014, were honored for their outstanding commitment to The Old Globe.

The Old Globe’s Board of Directors also includes: Elizabeth Altman, Pamela Cesak, Nicole A. Clay, Pamela A. Farr, Karen Fox, Jack Galloway, Victor P. Gálvez, Patricia A. Hodgkin, Daphne H. Jameson, Jo Ann Kilty, Tim Rafalovich, Crystal Sargent, Margi Sargis (Globe Guilders President, Ex Officio), Jean Shekhter, Rhona Thompson, Evelyn Mack Truitt, Stacey LeVasseur Vasquez, and Jordine Von Wantoch.

Emerita Director Sister Sally Furay, R.S.C.J. was also honored during the meeting. She began her service on The Old Globe’s Board of Directors in 1981 and was an active member on and off through 2008. She served as President of the Board in 1986 and 1987, and her tenure also included the role of Treasurer and positions on several committees. A member of the Society of the Sacred Heart and a former Provost at the University of San Diego, she also helped found the Old Globe/USD Graduate Theatre Program as well as the Globe’s Craig Noel League Planned Giving Program. Furay passed away on January 10, 2015 at the age of 88.

After the meeting, the Board and guests adjourned to the Annual Meeting Reception and Dinner held in the Prado Ballroom. The celebratory evening featured a program of songs performed by Joe Kinosian and Ian Lowe, the stars of Murder for Two, which runs through March 1 at The Old Globe.

To learn more, click here!


SD6 in the Morning features Murder for Two at the Old Globe Theatre

The two-man show, Murder for Two played by Joe Kinosian and Ian Lowe has arrived at the Old Globe Theatre. Video courtesy of SD6.



The Old Globe will kick off its 2015-2016 Season with the World Premiere of In Your Arms, an exuberant dance-theatre musical with Direction and Choreography by Christopher Gattelli, Music by Stephen Flaterty, and 10 vignettes written by a lineup of theatre legends

Tony Award winner Stephen Flaherty (Ragtime, Once on This Island; two-time Oscar nominee for Anastasia)

Tony Award winner Christopher Gattelli (Newsies, Godspell, Lincoln Center Theater’s South Pacific)

January 27, 2015—The Old Globe today announced it will open its 2015-2016 Season with In Your Arms, a World Premiere dance-theatre musical featuring direction and choreography by Tony Award winner Christopher Gattelli (Newsies, Godspell, Lincoln Center Theater’s South Pacific) and original music by Tony Award winner Stephen Flaherty (Ragtime, Once on This Island; two-time Oscar nominee for Anastasia). Co-conceived by Gattelli and Jennifer Manocherian, In Your Arms features 10 dance vignettes written by an incredible and diverse lineup of theatre powerhouses, including Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, and Alfred Uhry. Among them, the creators have amassed 14 Tony Awards, five Pulitzer Prizes, six Pulitzer finalist designations, and one Academy Award.

Part of The Old Globe’s yearlong celebration of its own 80th Anniversary and the Centennial of Balboa Park’s Panama-California Exposition, In Your Arms will run September 16 – October 25, 2015 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Preview performances run September 16 – September 23. Opening night is Thursday, September 24. Tickets will become available by subscription only this spring, with single tickets available to the general public later in the year.

In Your Arms is a sweeping and romantic evening of theatre created by an unprecedented constellation of America’s preeminent writers for the stage. Ten dance vignettes tell wordless stories of love, yearning, and romance, and constitute a magical evening of movement and music performed by a cast of 20 talented dancers. Each vignette takes place in a different place and time, and the 10 dances range from duets to large ensemble numbers. Thrilling styles of dance from classical ballet to swing, tap to tango, rock ’n’ roll to Charleston, modern to jazz are celebrated with verve and nuance. The emotional canvas of the stories is vast: some are funny, some are sad, and some are enchanting, but all delve deep into that most essential of human emotions: love.

 

To learn more, click here!


Mystery musical: A video preview of MURDER FOR TWO

By James Hebert

So what does a two-person musical whose style mixes the Marx Bros. with Agatha Christie (and maybe a little Hitchcock) actually look like? (And in particular, such a musical in which both actors also play piano?)

You can get at least some sense of the answer to that question with the video teaser the Old Globe has posted for its production of "Murder for Two," which begins performances Saturday at the Balboa Park theater.

As mentioned in our earlier preview story, "Murder for Two" is a musical-comedy take on detective tales (and in that sense is remarkably similar, at least on the surface, to "Gunmetal Blues," an older piece that coincidentally just opened at North Coast Rep).

And for further viewing: Joe Kinosian and Kellen Blair, the creators of "Murder for Two" (which Kinosian also will appear in at the Globe), have posted a large collection of their own videos on their Youtube page.

Those include clips documenting the show's earliest productions, plus highlights of some of their other work.


Auditions for High School Shakespeare Intensive March 21-22

Registration for the Middle School Summer Conservatory begins March 9

The Old Globe's 2013 Summer Shakespeare Intensive for High School students presented one-hour versions of The Two Gentleman's of Verona and Macbeth in the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre on Aug. 12, 2013. Photo by Doug Gates.

January 23, 2015—As The Old Globe celebrates its 80th Anniversary and its rich relationship with William Shakespeare, the theatre today announces that auditions for the Globe’s 2015 Summer Shakespeare Intensive for San Diego County high school students will be held on Saturday, March 21 and Sunday, March 22 on the Globe campus. The four-week program is a unique opportunity for high school actors and actresses to refine their skills as performers in a professional setting. The Intensive will take place on Saturday, July 11 and on weekdays from July 13 through August 10. The program will culminate with a public performance of two Shakespeare plays on Monday, August 10 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. The program cost is $725 with a limited number of need-based scholarships available. Auditions are by appointment only and can be scheduled beginning in February.

Students in the Summer Shakespeare Intensive study classical theatre technique, voice, movement, and stage combat led by theatre professionals while rehearsing for two productions of Shakespeare’s plays. Throughout the Intensive, the students have the unique opportunity to study Shakespeare and see the productions of the Globe’s Shakespeare Festival, which runs concurrently with the program. Festival company members lend the students insights into the art of performing Shakespeare that the students then apply to their own performances of the Bard’s work.

Registration begins on Monday, March 9 for the Middle School Summer Conservatory, a three-week program of intense acting study with professional teaching staff and actors from the Globe’s Shakespeare Festival productions. Students will explore scene study, stage combat, theatre games, improvisation, movement, and specialty workshops. The Conservatory will take place on weekdays, June 29 – July 17. The program cost is $625 ($600 for children and grandchildren of Globe subscribers) and does not require an audition, though a passion for theatre and acting is important. For more information or to register for the Conservatory, email GlobeLearning@TheOldGlobe.org.

To learn more, click here!


SISTER SALLY FURAY, LONGTIME GLOBE SUPPORTER, PASSES AWAY AT 88

January 13, 2015—The Globe has lost a dear friend in Sister Sally Furay, R.S.C.J., who passed away on January 10.  Sister Sally served as Academic Vice President and Provost at the University of San Diego for 25 years. Elected to The Old Globe Board of Directors in 1981, she went on to serve as Board President and Treasurer for many years. Her subsequent generosity—of time and expertise—was instrumental to the success and life of this theatre. Her close friendship with Craig Noel and understanding of the need for training actors in classical theatre led to a partnership between The Old Globe and USD, creating one of the most lauded M.F.A. graduate programs in the U.S., with myriad students going on to perform locally, in regional theatres, and on Broadway. Sister Sally was also instrumental in planning and supporting efforts for a strong endowment, which was another one of Craig Noel’s most cherished goals: to ensure the future of The Old Globe.

It is difficult to measure the huge impact she had on The Old Globe. Her wisdom, grace, and genuine passion for the dramatic  arts immensely assisted the Globe well into the 21st century, as the theatre was growing at an astronomical rate.  Her wise counsel in finance, legal, and human resource areas was heeded at every turn. Her service on the theatre’s Finance Committee endured to this year. She will be greatly missed.  There will never again be another Sister Sally Furay, as her place in history is now confirmed—a woman who, through her love, compassion, and brilliance, changed the world for scores of people and institutions throughout the country.


Emerita Board Director Carolyn Yorston-Wellcome, Globe Founding Director Craig Noel, and
Sister Sally Furay celebrating at an event at The Old Globe. Photo by Paul Nestor.


THE OLD GLOBE ANNOUNCES THE CAST AND CREATIVE TEAM OF THE MYSTERY MUSICAL MURDER FOR TWO

Performances Run JANUARY 24 – MARCH 1, Opening JANUARY 29!

December 23, 2014—The Old Globe today announced the full cast and creative team for Murder for Two, with book and music by Joe Kinosian and book and lyrics by Kellen Blair. Globe veteran Scott Schwartz (A Room with a View at the Globe, The Hunchback of Notre Dame at La Jolla Playhouse) returns to direct Blair and Kinosian’s Off Broadway hit, a vaudevillian mystery musical with an energetic two-man cast. Murder for Two will run January 24 – March 1 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Preview performances run January 24 – 28. Opening night is Thursday, January 29 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park. Single tickets are on sale to the general public now.

Great American novelist Arthur Whitney has been murdered at his own birthday party, and his killer could be any one of the guests. But this is no ordinary murder mystery. The entire world of this hilarious musical is brought to life by two incredible performers: one plays the detective, the other plays all 10 suspects, and both play the piano! Murder for Two is an irrepressibly wacky tour-de-force musical that NewYork1 dubbed “a must-see 90-minute jolt of caffeinated creativity!”

The acting company includes Joe Kinosian as The Suspects. Kinosian is the co-recipient (with Kellen Blair) of Chicago’s Joseph Jefferson Award, recognizing Murder for Two as Best New Work – Musical or Review following its record-breaking run at Chicago Shakespeare Theater. He was also nominated for Best Actor in a Principal Role as The Suspects. Ian Lowe reprises the role of Marcus following a highly successful Off Broadway run in the role at New World Stages.He was also seen in Nikolai and the Others at Lincoln Center Theater. Kyle Branzel and Brandon Lambert serve as the understudies for The Suspects and Marcus, respectively.

The creative team includes Wendy Seyb (Choreographer), Beowulf Boritt (Scenic Design), Andrea Lauer (Costume Design), Jason Lyons (Lighting Design), Jill BC Du Boff (Sound Design), David Caldwell (Music Director), J. Scott Lapp (Assistant Director), Calleri Casting (Casting), Kat West (Production Stage Manager), and Production Core (Production Supervisor).

Murder for Two is theatre at its most fun,” said Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “Silly, energetic, hilarious, and virtuosic, it is sure to kick off the Globe’s celebration of its 80th year and Balboa Park’s centennial in high style, and certain to put big smiles on lots and lots of faces. Joe Kinosian, Kellen Blair, and Scott Schwartz have concocted a real treat, and it’s a very special thrill that Kinosian will be on our stage leading the shenanigans. I look forward to sharing a great evening of laughter with San Diego audiences.”

To learn more, click here!


HAL LINDEN to Star as THE OLD GLOBE Presents the West Coast Premiere of THE TWENTY-SEVENTH MAN

Join Us Wednesday, February 18 to Explore Issues Raised in the Production ~ Barry Edelstein In Conversation with Nathan Englander

December 22, 2014—The Old Globe today announced Tony and Emmy Award winner Hal Linden (“Barney Miller,” The Rothschilds) will star in the West Coast Premiere of The Twenty-seventh Manby award-winning novelist Nathan Englander, directed by Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. The cast also features Ron Orbach, Robert Dorfman, Eli Gelb, James Shanklin, and Lowell Byers. The Twenty-seventh Man will run February 14 through March 15 in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Preview performances run February 14 – 18. Opening night is Thursday, February 19 at 8:00 p.m. Single tickets go on sale Friday, January 16. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

In a Soviet prison in 1952, Stalin’s secret police have rounded up 26 writers, the giants of Yiddish literature in Russia. As judgment looms, a 27th suddenly appears: a teenager, unpublished and unknown. Baffled by his arrest, he and his cellmates wonder at what has brought them together and wrestle with what it means to write in troubled times. Time Out New York called The Twenty-seventh Man “exquisite – as chilling and haunted as a ghost story.” With The Twenty-seventh Man, Edelstein returns to the Englander play he premiered in New York and reimagines it for the Globe’s intimate in-the-round space, bringing us larger-than-life personalities and an unforgettable reminder of the transcendent power of storytelling.

Hal Linden will play Yiddish writer Yevgeny Zunser. A versatile Emmy and Tony Award-winning actor/singer/musician, Linden appeared on Broadway in Cabaret, The Gathering, The Sisters Rosensweig, and I’m Not Rappaport, Off Broadway in Visiting Mr. Green, and as Scrooge in A Christmas Carol at Madison Square Garden. The world recognizes him from the enormously popular television series “Barney Miller,” and he is a familiar face on television and in films including Out to Sea and A New Life.

The acting company also includes Lowell Byers (the Globe’s The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Othello,and Pericles, Prince of Tyre) as the Guard, Robert Dorfman (The Lion King and Social Security on Broadway, A Dybbuk and The Normal Heart at The Public) as Vasily Korinsky, Eli Gelb (Off Broadway’s The Thickness of Skin and Brighton Beach Memoirs) as Pinchas Pelovits, Ron Orbach (film Clueless, Chicago and Laughter on the 23rd Floor on Broadway) as Moishe Bretzky, and James Shanklin (“Hell on Wheels,” original Broadway company of Wit, Bethany at the Globe) as Agent in Charge.

The creative team includes Michael McGarty (Scenic Design), Katherine Roth (Costume Design), Russell H. Champa (Lighting Design), Darron L West (Sound Design), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Anjee Nero (Stage Manager).

“I’m honored to bring Nathan Englander’s beautiful and powerful play to the Globe in its first production since its New York premiere,” said Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. “The play highlights a little-known episode in 20th-century history that deserves to be remembered, but its canvas is much larger than that. It talks about the potency of art and the necessity of stories, and it reminds us that while tyranny is a sad constant in human life, so are wit, wisdom, and the creative spark. Englander’s very specific voice speaks to universal themes, and I know San Diego audiences will be moved by his work.”

You can see the full press release here.


Interviews with the playwrights of the New Voices Festival performances

The 2014 New Voices Festival brings a dynamic and exciting group of playwrights to The Old Globe for the first time. It’s an opportunity for Globe audiences to see new work, and it’s also a chance for the writers and the Globe community to get to know each other. We asked playwrights Kimber Lee, Dominique Morriseau, and Anna Ziegler to tell us a bit about their plays, process, and what participating in the New Voices Festival means to them.

 

brownsville song (b-side for tray) Playwright Kimber Lee

TALKING WITH: BROWNSVILLE SONG PLAYWRIGHT KIMBER LEE

What was the inspiration for this piece?
It was something I read on a blog, a story about the loss of a young man in Brownsville. The post was very simply written but it sort of lodged in my gut and wouldn't let go. I kept thinking about this boy's family and loved ones - what they must be going through. I kept thinking about the tremendous loss of life in some of our communities, and how easy it is in this hyper-connected world for these losses to disappear from our consciousness. And how that is especially true for some of our more challenged neighborhoods—the only time we hear about them is when something violent has happened. Often there can be this sort of head-shaking resignation—“Oh, well. That's just what happens there."—and implicit in that thought is the idea that it's acceptable somehow. That if you look a certain way, and live in a certain zipcode, your life is worth less, you matter less—and this was going around in a circle in my head. I didn't know what I could do about it, what I could offer—how to bear witness in meaningful way. And I was trying to work on another project, but when I sat down to write, Lena's voice came blazing out of me.

Did you do any specific research to develop the world of the play and the people who inhabit it?
I think a lot of the rhythms and texture of the play come from all of the time I spend training in boxing gyms here in NYC, and from living in Brooklyn. When we were preparing for the LCT3 production, the director Patricia McGregor, the actors, the design team, and I all went to visit the Brownsville Recreation Center, and spoke at length with longtime residents of the community. The BRC also brought several large groups to see the play at Lincoln Center, which was very special. To hear from the community that they felt well-represented on that stage was a huge gift.

Where are you in the process of this piece – what is its next step?
I've had almost two years of development and two full productions with the play, and it is time to kiss it fondly on the head and send it out into the world to make its way. It's my first time doing that with play, and it makes me slightly nervous, but it is very exciting to think of brownsville song families being formed to tell this story in other cities.

How are festivals and readings like this one helpful to you as a writer?
Getting to share work outside of my home base in NYC can provide a fresh perspective - different parts of the story resonate in different ways, and every audience is so unique. It's also a great way to be introduced to a new theatre community, and meet new collaborators, and get a sense of what is happening around the country.

 

Skeleton Crew Playwright Dominique Morisseau

TALKING WITH: SKELETON CREW PLAYWRIGHT DOMINIQUE MORRISEAU

What was the inspiration for this piece?
This play is part of a three-play cycle about my hometown of Detroit, so my inspiration was sparked by that initial interest. I wanted to look at three iconic periods in Detroit's history that changed the social structure and community in the city as we know it. As far as the last play in my cycle, SKELETON CREW is the most contemporary. The year 2008 means a lot to this country, and a lot to the city of Detroit. I am inspired by the blue collar workers of the world who keep it running, and especially what blue collar vs. white collar means in my hometown. These are all things that are tackled in SKELETON CREW.

Did you do any specific research to develop the world of the play and the people who inhabit it?
Absolutely. And still going. I talked to auto workers, UAW leaders and presidents and former presidents, I read books on closing stamping plants and the history of revolutions in Detroit's working class, I visited museums and plants, and I watched documentaries on Detroit's auto industry.

Where are you in the process of this piece – what is its next step?
I'm in a good place with my play. It's been through a Sundance 3-week workshop and a Lark Barebones workshop production for 4 weeks. The next step for me is likely production. Some of the things I wish to continue to fine tune are able to be achieved in a rehearsal process.

How are festivals and readings like this one helpful to you as a writer?
It allows me to hear the play outside of my comfortable theatre community that I've gotten to know in NYC. This is a whole different coast, with a whole different audience and a whole different set of expectations. So I believe it could help me truly discover what is in my play. But beyond that, being able to engage with other artists and audiences through this festival allows me to build a stronger network of supporters and potential future collaborators. Theatremaking is a community sport, so the more opportunities to increase my community, the better!

 

The Last Match Playwright Anna Ziegler

TALKING WITH: LAST MATCH PLAYWRIGHT ANNA ZIEGLER

What was the inspiration for this piece?
I started thinking about this piece in 2012 when Andy Roddick announced he would retire after the U.S. Open. He and I are about the same age and it was strange, and moving, to think about a contemporary of mine having to give up the life he’d known up to that point, everything he’d lived for. It occurred to me that this loss, or ending, really almost a death, mirrored events in all of our lives. Maybe it was no coincidence that this story struck me just as I was starting to consider having a child. My son was born in the summer of 2013, while I watched Wimbledon from my hospital bed. It was perhaps the purest joy I’d ever felt and I didn’t expect it. I also didn’t expect the powerful sense of mortality that welled up in me in those first weeks. It really did feel like the end of my childhood, and I understood then why I’d been so moved by Roddick’s tearful speech after he lost the match that would be his last.

Did you do any specific research to develop the world of the play and the people who inhabit it?
I’ve always been a tennis fan so I didn’t need to do too much research, but I did read a number of articles and essays about athletes on the verge of retiring, or athletes who continue to play while the world speculates when they might hang up their boots. I read a lot about Federer, who is in this nebulous place in his career now, and I read a fair bit about Derek Jeter this past summer. And of course I read a fair bit about Novak Djokovic, on whom the character of Sergei is very loosely based.

Where are you in the process of this piece – what is its next step?
This play is still in its pretty early stages. I’ve only heard it once aloud at this point, and only in front of eight or nine people, so the next step will be figuring out what the audience in San Diego responds to, what less so, and reshaping the play accordingly.

How are festivals and readings like this one helpful to you as a writer?
They’re so incredibly helpful in so many ways—they allow a writer to zero in on a single piece for a short, intense period—it’s always good to get away from the busy routines of home and be forced to focus. A reading in front of an audience is always so valuable as I mentioned above. And the exposure for the piece is great too.

You can see more on each of these shows here.


The U-T Features The Grinch costumes backstage!

Follow Peggy Peattie from U-T San Diego as she delves into the creation of The Grinch's costumes.

Who dresses the Whos? Shelly Williams, costume designer for Dr. Suess' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! at San Diego's Old Globe Theatre takes us backstage where the polka dots and green claws are groomed for the production's cast. Courtesy of Peggy Peattie of the UT. Video


Get in the Holiday spirit with Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

America's favorite holiday fable has arrived at the Globe! Watch four of this year's magical songs!

Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! is a wonderful, whimsical musical based upon the classic Dr. Seuss book. Back for its 17th incredible year, the family favorite features the following songs.

"You're a Mean One, Mr. Grinch"
"Fah Who Doraze"
"Whatchama-who"
"This Time of Year"

Celebrate the holidays as the Old Globe Theatre is once again transformed into the snow-covered Whoville, right down to the last can of Who-hash.

The cast includes Burke Moses (The Grinch), Taylor Coleman and Gabriella Dimmick (Cindy-Lou Who), Steve Gunderson (Old Max), Jeffrey Schecter (Young Max), Robert J. Townsend (Papa Who), Bets Malone (Mama Who), Geno Carr (Grandpa Who), Nancy Snow Carr (Grandma Who), Katelyn Katz and Alexis Rae Tenney (Annie Who), Brooke Henderson and Mikaela Celeste Villalpando (Betty-Lou Who), Noah Baird and Elliot Weaver (Boo Who), and Jordi Bertran and Imahni King-Murillo (Danny Who) with Ensemble members Luke Babbitt, Josh Bradford, Nathan Conlan, Sophia Dimmick, Savannah Rae Farmer, David Kirk Grant, Kyrsten Hafso-Koppman, Jacob Haren, Jolie Hoang-Rappaport, Hourie Klijian, Cady Mariano, Dylan Nalbandian, Nathan Andrew Riley, Lexy Sakrekoff, Jill Townsend, and Kelsey Venter, as well as James Vásquez (Swing).



"You're a Mean One, Mr. Grinch"

Burke Moses (The Grinch), Steve Gunderson (Old Max), and Jeffrey Schecter (Young Max) perform "You're a Mean One, Mr. Grinch" in the 2014 production of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! at The Old Globe.

"Fah Who Doraze"

The cast performs "Welcome Christmas" ("Fah Who Doraze") in the 2014 production of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! at The Old Globe.



"Whatchama-who"

Burke Moses (The Grinch) the cast perform "Whatchama-who" in the 2014 production of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! at The Old Globe.



"This Time of Year"

Steve Gunderson (Old Max) and Jeffrey Schecter (Young Max) perform "This Time of Year" in the 2014 production of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! at The Old Globe.


The Ninth Annual Old Globe Grinch Christmas Tree Lighting


11/16/2014 - Coverage of The Ninth Annual Grinch Christmas Tree Lighting by KUSI Photojournalist Mark Mehlinger at The Old Globe's Copley Plaza, Balboa Park, San Diego

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Showcasing Shakespeare to Prisoners


Globe for All's professional production of Shakespeare's fascinating romance All's Well That Ends Well spent the last two weeks touring community venues throughout San Diego, helping make theatre matter to a wider cross-section of our city. From military bases, recreation centers, libraries, centers for the elderly, to homeless shelters, we delighted in the audience's broad smiles and rapt attention as many saw their first Shakespeare play ever. Here's NBC 7/39's Artie Ojeda intriguing report from Centinela State Prison:

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Two directors announced for The Old Globe's 2014-2015 Season!

Newly announced Director of Rich Girl, James Vásquez.

Jessica Stone will direct George Bernard Shaw's Arms and the Man.


SAN DIEGO (June 10, 2014; UPDATED Nov. 6, 2014)—The Old Globe today announced that James Vásquez (Dr. Seuss' How The Grinch Stole Christmas!, Richard O'Brien's The Rocky Horror Show) will direct the final show of its 2014-2015 Season, the West Coast premiere of an exciting new American play, Rich Girl, by acclaimed playwright Victoria Stewart. Rich Girl will play May 23 – June 21, 2015.

Celebrated director Jessica Stone, who recently made her Globe debut with Christopher Durang's Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, will direct George Bernard Shaw's Arms and the Man. Utterly romantic and one of the wittiest and most charming plays of the English stage, Arms and the Man mixes smarts and silliness in a wonderfully entertaining tale of love and war beginning May 9.

Rich Girl will play in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre and Arms and the Man on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, all part of the Globe's Conrad Prebys Theatre Center.

Tickets to the Globe's 2014-2015 Season subscription prices range from $99 to $615, and packages may be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office.

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Join Us For Our Annual Christmas Tree Lighting!

San Diego families filled The Old Globe's plaza to watch the ninth annual Christmas Tree Lighting on Nov. 16, 2014, featuring performances by the cast of Dr. Seuss How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, the lighting of the Seuss-inspired Christmas tree, and a delightful holiday snowfall.

 

The ninth annual Old Globe Christmas Tree Lighting will kick off the holiday season in conjunction with San Diego's favorite holiday musical, Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! Designed by Grinch scenic designer John Lee Beatty, the unique tree will be located in the center of the Globe Plaza and will remain for the run of the show.

This free fun family event will feature a special live performance by members of the Grinch cast and a delightful holiday snowfall on the Globe's Copley Plaza. Although the event is free, reservations are required.

Reservations can be made by contacting the Box Office at (619) 23-GLOBE. Once again, one lucky child will be crowned "Santa for a Day" at the event.

Santa For a Day

Parents of children aged 3 - 10 may submit their child's drawing expressing what the holidays mean to them and their family to be entered in the Globe's "Santa for a Day" contest. The randomly selected winner will receive a VIP Family Four-Pack to attend the 4:30 p.m. performance of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! on Nov. 16 and, directly after the show, assist the Grinch on stage with the lighting of the tree at the Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony.

Parents may enter their child's drawing by emailing a photo of it to Contest@TheOldGlobe.org, or drawings may also be delivered in person to the Globe Box Office or mailed to "Santa for a Day" Contest, P.O. Box 122171, San Diego, CA 92112. All of these submissions will be posted online on The Old Globe's Facebook page. Parents may also enter by posting a photo of their child's drawing on their Instagram page and tagging @TheOldGlobe.

Contest entries will be accepted through Wednesday, Nov. 12, and the winner will be announced on the Globe's Facebook and Instagram pages on Thursday, Nov. 13. All entries must include the name and age of the child and a parent or guardian's phone. One winner will be chosen at random from all entries received by Nov. 12. Only one entry per child will be accepted. Families with multiple children may submit multiple drawings. Submitted drawings will not be returned.


The Old Globe Takes Shakespeare Into the San Diego Community With "Globe for All," Beginning Tuesday, October 28!

What does a woman do when the only man she wants to marry won't have her, even when the king commands it? In All's Well That Ends Well (last seen in the Globe's 2008 Shakespeare Festival), Shakespeare pits the wise and witty Helena against the hotheaded courtier Bertram in a clash of wills filled with comic surprises and passionate poetry.

All's Well That Ends Well is the first production of a new program: Globe for All, which brings professional theatre to community venues throughout San Diego, helping make theatre matter to a wider cross-section of our city.

This free-of-charge tour of a professional production of Shakespeare will allow the theatre to serve more communities throughout San Diego by collaborating with a diverse range of local organizations. Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein directs the first production, Shakespeare's fascinating romance All's Well That Ends Well.

Performances available to the public include

Tuesday, October 28 - 5:00 p.m.
Naval Base San Diego
The Anchors Catering and Conference Center
2375 Recreation Way, Bldg. 3210
Door open at 4:00 p.m.
Questions - call (619) 556-7788

Friday, October 31 - 1:30 p.m.
Fourth District Seniors Resource Center
570 S. 65th Street
Doors open at 1pm
Questions - call (619) 266-3699

Sunday, November 2 - 2:00 p.m.
Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation
Celebration Hall
404 Euclid Avenue
Doors open at 1:30 p.m.
Questions - call (619) 527-6161

Tuesday, November 4 - 6:30 p.m.
San Diego Central Library
Joan and Irwin Jacobs Common
Shiley Special Events Suite
330 Park Boulevard
Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
Questions - email PMiesner@sandiego.gov

The Globe for All tour will present Shakespeare in a variety of community venues including military bases, recreation centers, libraries, centers for the elderly, homeless shelters, and correctional facilities. The emphasis will be on reaching underserved communities and multigenerational audiences. Globe for All employs a model of community outreach designed to make theatre matter to audiences who, for whatever reason, have not enjoyed regular access to the professional performing arts. The tour will play in non-theatrical venues such as gymnasiums, cafeterias, and multipurpose rooms. With production values scaled to those spaces, the tour will give audiences an intimate, up-close, and visceral experience of live performance and will foster a shared sense of community between performer and spectator.

Support for Globe for All includes grants from The Legler Benbough Foundation, The Parker Foundation (Gerald T. and Inez Grant Parker), The Kenneth T. and Eileen L. Norris Foundation, and the County of San Diego's Community Enhancement Program. Additional support provided by Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation.

Read about the cast, and about performances at the Globe in November


Artistic Director Barry Edelstein (seated, center) with the cast of the inaugural production of the Globe's new touring program Globe for All, Shakespeare's All's Well That Ends Well, directed by Edelstein, beginning Oct. 28, 2014. Photo by Mike Hausberg.


The Old Globe/University of San Diego Graduate Theatre Program Presents Shakespeare's Pericles, Prince of Tyre!

Running Saturday, November 15 through Sunday, November 23 at The Old Globe

SAN DIEGO (Oct. 22, 2014)—The Old Globe today announced the cast and creative team for the Old Globe/University of San Diego Graduate Theatre Program presentation of William Shakespeare's Pericles, Prince of Tyre, running November 15 – November 23 in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Globe's Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Opening night is Saturday, November 15 at 8:00 p.m. Directed by Ray Chambers, tickets to Pericles can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office.

Pericles, Prince of Tyre is a startling epic of the trials, heartbreak, and redemption of a warrior who must navigate the dangerous currents of human corruption and angry fate. Join him as he travels across the treacherous oceans of North Africa, ancient Syria, Turkey, and Greece and is forever changed by the comically exotic and morally vague figures he meets. Love, betrayal, laughter, and adventure unfold in this engrossing, yet seldom produced, Shakespearean gem.

"The Old Globe's M.F.A. program is one of the jewels in this theater's crown, and I'm as proud of the work we do training the next generation of American actors as I am of anything else in the institution's life," said Artistic Director Barry Edelstein. "The talent that thrives in our venture with USD is top-notch, and in the fascinating Shakespearean saga that is Pericles, Prince of Tyre, that talent will be on dazzling display."

The cast features Amy Blackman (Thaisa), Maxx Brawer (Cleon), Lindsay Brill (Bawd), Charlotte Bydwell (Lychorida, Diana), Lowell Byers (Pericles), Ally Carey (Dionyza), Jamal Douglas (Simonides), Tyler Kent (Helicanus), Jake Millgard (Cerimon, Pandar), Makha Mthembu (Marina), Daniel Petzold (Boult), Megan M. Storti (Gower), Nathan Whitmer (Antiochus, Leonine), and Patrick Zeller (Lysimachus, Thailard).

The creative team includes Sean Fanning and Brian Redfern (Scenic Design), Elisa Benzoni (Costume Design), Jason Bieber (Lighting Design), Melanie Chen (Sound Design), Jan Gist (Voice and Speech Coach), Brian Byrnes (Movement Coach), Nicole Ries (Production Stage Manager), and Ryan Heath (Assistant Stage Manager).

A joint venture of The Old Globe and the University of San Diego, the Master of Fine Arts in Dramatic Arts program nationally recruits seven students each year to participate in an intensive two-year, year-round course of graduate study in classical theatre. Private funding for the Master of Fine Arts in Theatre program has been contributed through a generous endowment established by Donald and Darlene Shiley. Additional support for the program is provided by The Dorothy Brown Endowment Fund and the Louis Yager Cantwell Foundation. For additional information, visit www.globemfa.org.

Since first training with The Old Globe in the mid-80s, Ray Chambers (Director) has worked as a classical actor and director with numerous regional theatres across the country. For nearly two decades as an Associate Artist with Alabama Shakespeare Festival, he has worked as actor, director, writer, and instructor, and he served as Director of the Master of Fine Arts/Professional Actor Training Program at ASF from 2001 to 2009. His regional acting credits include title roles in Hamlet, The Count of Monte Cristo, Richard III, Coriolanus, King John, Henry V, and Tartuffe and leading roles in Julius Caesar, The Winter's Tale, The Rivals, Henry IV, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Great Expectations, The Importance of Being Earnest, and Saint Joan, among many others. His credits at The Old Globe include The Life of Riley, Coriolanus, The Comedy of Errors, The School for Scandal, Love's Labour's Lost, Hamlet, and Macbeth. He has taught Acting and Classical Text in master classes and workshops for universities and theatres around the country and is currently Head of Acting with the Old Globe/University of San Diego Graduate Theatre Program.


Art courtesy of The Old Globe.


The Globe announces the cast and creative team for the 17th annual production of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

SAN DIEGO (October 17, 2014)—The Old Globe today announced the complete cast and creative team for the Globe's 17th annual production of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The holiday musical will run on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe's Conrad Prebys Theatre Center, November 15 – December 27. Previews run from November 15 – November 19. Opening night is November 20 at 7:00 p.m. The Grinch is directed by James Vàsquez with book and lyrics by Timothy Mason and music by Mel Marvin. The original production of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! was conceived and directed by Jack O'Brien with Additional Lyrics by Theodor S. Geisel, Additional Music by Albert Hague, and original choreography by John DeLuca. Ticket prices start at $37 for adults and $24 for children (17 years and under). Performances are restricted to children 3 years and up except for the 11:00 a.m. performances for which tickets can be purchased for children of all ages. Everyone must have a ticket. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office.

Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! is a wonderful, whimsical musical based upon the classic Dr. Seuss book. Back for its 17th incredible year, the family favorite features the songs "Santa for a Day," "You're a Mean One, Mr. Grinch," and "Welcome, Christmas (Fah Who Doraze)," the delightful carol from the popular animated version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas! Celebrate the holidays as the Old Globe Theatre is once again transformed into the snow-covered Whoville, right down to the last can of Who-hash.

Burke Moses makes his Old Globe debut as The Grinch. He made his Broadway debut as Sky Masterson in Guys and Dolls and then went on to create the role of Gaston in the New York, Los Angeles, and West End productions of Disney's mega-hit Beauty and the Beast. He also starred on Broadway in Kiss Me, Kate and Sondheim's Frogs and Off Broadway in The Most Happy Fella, Li'l Abner, and The Fantasticks.

Returning to alternate in the role of Cindy-Lou Who are Taylor Coleman of Carmel Valley and Gabriella Dimmick of La Mesa. Coleman recently played Minnie in Annie Get Your Gun at San Diego Musical Theatre and also performs with the Royal Academy of Performing Arts, seen numerous times at Mandeville Auditorium. Dimmick was most recently seen as Molly in Annie Jr. at Actors' Conservatory Theatr – San Diego and Gretl in The Sound of Music at San Diego Musical Theatre. She has danced with California Ballet Company for several years, appearing in their productions of The Nutcracker (2010-2012), Dracula, and Alice in Wonderland.

Three-time San Diego Critics Circle Award winner Steve Gunderson returns as Old Max and marks his 12th appearance in The Grinch at the Globe. His Off Broadway credits include Suds: The Rocking '60s Musical Soap Opera, Forever Plaid, Back to Bacharach and David, Butley, and Street Scene. Returning as Young Max is Jeffrey Schecter, who previously appeared at the Globe in the world premiere musical Robin and the 7 Hoods. His extensive Broadway credits include Nice Work If You Can Get It, Anything Goes, A Chorus Line, and The Pajama Game, among others.

Rounding out the cast of The Grinch are Robert J. Townsend (Papa Who), Bets Malone (Mama Who), Geno Carr (Grandpa Who), Nancy Snow Carr (Grandma Who), Katelyn Katz and Alexis Rae Tenney (Annie Who), Brooke Henderson and Mikaela Celeste Villalpando (Betty-Lou Who), Noah Baird and Elliot Weaver (Boo Who), and Jordi Bertran and Imahni King-Murillo (Danny Who) with Ensemble members Luke Babbitt, Josh Bradford, Nathan Conlan, Sophia Dimmick, Savannah Rae Farmer, David Kirk Grant, Kyrsten Hafso-Koppman, Jacob Haren, Jolie Hoang-Rappaport, Hourie Klijian, Cady Mariano, Dylan Nalbandian, Nathan Andrew Riley, Lexy Sakrekoff, Jill Townsend, and Kelsey Venter, as well as James Vàsquez (Swing).

This season's production features Musical Direction by Elan McMahan, Additional Choreography by Bob Richard, and Restaged Choreography by James Vàsquez. The Grinch creative team also includes John Lee Beatty (Scenic Design), Robert Morgan (Costume Design), Pat Collins (Lighting Design), Paul Peterson (Sound Design), Anita Ruth (Orchestrator), Joshua Rosenblum (Vocal Arrangements and Incidental Music), David Krane (Dance Music Arranger), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Leila Knox (Stage Manager).

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Burke Moses as The Grinch.
(from left) Taylor Coleman and Gabriella Dimmick star as Cindy-Lou Who. Photo by Jim Cox.

Bright Star sizzle reel at The Old Globe!



The Old Globe presents the World Premiere of Bright Star, a new American musical featuring music by Edie Brickell and Steve Martin, lyrics by Brickell, and book by Martin, based on an original story by Martin and Brickell. Directed by Walter Bobbie, Bright Star runs September 13 – November 2, 2014 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe's Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

Songs featured in this exclusive preview:
"Bright Star," with A.J. Shively and the cast
"Sun's Gonna Shine," with Stephen Bogardus, A.J. Shively, Carmen Cusack, Hannah Elless, Allison Briner, and the cast
"Asheville," with Hannah Elless

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Steve Martin earns a movie honor!

While you were reading this caption, Steve Martin also composed a sonnet and learned two foreign languages. Photo by Jim Cox.

AFI announces lifetime achievement award for writer-comic-actor, now at the Old Globe with new musical Bright Star!

By James Hebert

Let's be honest here: Do we really know who Steve Martin is?

Some say he's the writer and co-composer of the world-premiere musical Bright Star, now onstage at the Old Globe Theatre.

(Actually, he says that, in this U-T interview about the show: )

(Come to think of it, we pretty much say that too, in our review of the production: )

We know he has been a standup comic. We know he doggedly pursued that career despite a string of bizarre apparent accidents in midperformance.

We know he wrote about that time of his life in a very serious book about the art of being funny.

We know he is probably not an IRS agent, and we're very sorry you gave him all that money.

But here's something no one could have ever dreamed about Steve Martin: He's also a big movie star!

(Oh, you already knew that too?)

The American Film Institute is obviously pretty aware of the fact: The organization has revealed that this June, it will honor Martin with a lifetime achievement award.

In announcing the award, AFI Chairman Howard Stringer said: "Steve Martin is an American original. From a wild and crazy stand-up comic to one who stands tall among the great figures in this American art form, he is a multilayered creative force bound by neither convention nor caution. His work is defined by him alone, for he is the author – and a national treasure whose work has stuck with us like an arrow in the head. AFI is proud to present him with its 43rd Life Achievement Award."

Martin, whose long list of films includes "The Jerk," "Pennies From Heaven," "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels" (coincidentally made into a musical at the Old Globe), "Little Shop of Horrors," "L.A. Story" and many more, was previously the recipient of an honorary Oscar,

So, that's what this item is about. Steve Martin: AFI Award. (Just in case you thought it was an excuse to plug our interview with Martin, and our review of the show. Both of which are available via conveniently clickable links in the third and fourth paragraphs above.)

Click here to see the orginal post if this article.


Steve Martin to Receive AFI Life Achievement Award

Bright Star Co-creator Steve Martin. Photo by Kevin Winter

Steve Martin has been tapped as the 43rd recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award, to be presented at a June 4 gala. This is a good year for Martin, who received an Honorary Oscar last November and recently opened a new musical, Bright Star (which Martin created with Edie Brickell), at the Old Globe. He was given a Kennedy Center honor in 2007.

The American Film Institute tribute will air on TNT.

According to the American Film Institute, the Lifetime Achievement nod is given to "an individual whose career in motion pictures or television has greatly contributed to the enrichment of American culture."

In making the announcement, AFI board of trustees chairman Howard Stringer said, "Steve Martin is an American original. From a wild and crazy stand-up comic to one who stands tall among the great figures in this American art form, he is a multi-layered creative force bound by neither convention nor caution. His work is defined by him alone, for he is the author – and a national treasure whose work has stuck with us like an arrow in the head. AFI is proud to present him with its 43rd Life Achievement Award."

After working at Disneyland performing magic tricks and selling guidebooks, Martin became a writer for "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour" in the 1960s and segued into work as a standup comic. He earned an Oscar nom for the short "The Absent-Minded Waiter" and made his feature bow with the 1979’s "The Jerk."

He won an Emmy for his TV writing, and has Grammys for the comedy albums "Let’s Get Small" and "A Wild and Crazy Guy." He won another Grammy for best American Roots Song for "Love Has Come For You" His books include "Cruel Shoes" and "Shopgirl."

On June 5, Jane Fonda became the eighth woman to receive the AFI Life Achievement honor. The ceremony was telecast a week later on TNT.

John Ford was the first honoree, in 1973. For the first 20 years, AFI mostly honored retired film giants whose most prolific years were behind them, such as Ford, Alfred Hitchcock, Bette Davis and Frank Capra.

But in the last two decades, the honorees have been people with still-active careers, such as Steven Spielberg, Clint Eastwood, Martin Scorsese and Meryl Streep. In 1993, the AFI board of trustees had extended the criteria "to encompass individuals with active careers and work of significance yet to be accomplished," according to AFI.

 

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