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AN IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING AT THE OLD GLOBE

We look forward to seeing all of our patrons at The Old Globe. Below you will find three pieces of important information regarding your visit.

Laurel Street/Cabrillo Bridge Closure
The Laurel Street/Cabrillo Bridge is closed to vehicle traffic through the summer of 2014 for seismic retrofits to the bridge. The bridge remains accessible to pedestrians and bicycles. Parking in Balboa Park will be unaffected by the closure of the bridge, but vehicles will need to access the park via Park Boulevard during the repair period.

Please click here for directions to the Old Globe via the Park Boulevard entrance to Balboa Park.

Alcazar Parking Lot Closure
The parking lot adjacent to the Alcazar Garden is temporarily closed. It is currently scheduled to reopen in May. The City will re-grade the lot and increase the number of spots available to disabled users of the Park.

While the Alcazar lot is closed, the City of San Diego will extend the hours of the new Balboa Park trams until after Old Globe performances have concluded (until 10:00 p.m. on Sundays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and until 11:00 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays). If you wish to take the trams to and from the Globe, please park near the pick-up location at Inspiration Point, on the east side of Park Boulevard near its intersection with President’s Way. Trams depart every 10-15 minutes and deliver guests to the heart of Balboa Park at the Plaza de Panama.

If you prefer to walk, you may continue to park at the Organ Pavilion lot or another Balboa Park parking lot. The trams do not have a stop at Organ Pavilion.

Parking in Balboa Park
Parking in Balboa Park can become extremely congested at any time, and parking lots can fill very quickly. We recommend that you arrive to Balboa Park at least one hour prior to your scheduled performance in order to secure parking and locate your seats.

We maintain an No Late Seating policy in order to ensure the safety of our patrons and actors. Patrons who arrive late or leave their seats during the performance may be given alternative seating.

If you have additional questions, please contact our ticket office at (619) 234-5623.

Thank you very much, and we’ll see you soon at The Old Globe!


THE OLD GLOBE ANNOUNCES ITS 2014-2015 SEASON

Steve Martin and Edie Brickell.

(4/18/14) • The Old Globe has announced its 2014-2015 Season, beginning September 13 with the World Premiere of Bright Star, a new American musical with music by Edie Brickell and Steve Martin, lyrics by Edie Brickell, book by Steve Martin, based on an original story by Steve Martin and Edie Brickell. Tony Award winner Walter Bobbie makes his Globe debut directing with this entertaining musical of enduring love, family ties, and the light of forgiveness that shines from a bright star.

The Globe is delighted to welcome one of the true geniuses of the American theatre, Tony Award winner Mary Zimmerman, who makes her long-awaited San Diego directing debut beginning March 21 with an enchanting theatrical spectacle, The White Snake. Jonathan Tolins’s “totally fictional” Off Broadway hit, Buyer & Cellar, will have you rolling in the aisles. Directed by Ron Lagomarsino, performances begin April 4.

With The Twenty-Seventh Man, Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein returns to the play he premiered in New York by award-winning novelist Nathan Englander and reimagines it for the Globe’s intimate in-the-round space, bringing us larger-than-life personalities and an unforgettable reminder of the transcendent power of storytelling. It makes its West Coast Premiere on February 14.

Boxing’s “breakthrough saga for a new generation” (LA Times), Marco Ramirez’s wildly theatrical new play The Royale brings to explosive life the sights and sounds of the early 20th century boxing circuit, beginning October 4. Globe veteran Scott Schwartz returns January 24 to direct Kellen Blair and Joe Kinosian’s Off Broadway hit, Murder for Two, a vaudevillian mystery musical with an energetic two-man cast. Utterly romantic and one of the wittiest and most charming plays of the English stage, George Bernard Shaw’s Arms and the Man mixes smarts and silliness in a wonderfully entertaining tale of love and war beginning May 9.

The 2014-2015 Season will also include the 17th annual production of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, beginning performances November 15. Tickets to the Globe’s 2014-2015 Season are currently available by subscription only. Subscription prices range from $99 to $615. Subscription packages may be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office.

“The Old Globe’s 2014-2015 Season offers some of everything that makes this theatre one of America’s greatest, and I am thrilled to announce it,” said Edelstein. “From a world premiere musical by two of our country’s entertainment giants to a classic by Shaw; from an historical drama by an eminent novelist to a wacky musical whodunit; and from a visually splendid take on a classic fable to a wry and riotous look at contemporary celebrity—the range and variety of the season is enormous.”

Edelstein continued, “As always, in this season the Globe welcomes our country’s most visionary theatre artists to San Diego, and they are a spectacularly talented group. Their work—and especially the abundance of laughter and light it brings—marks the Globe’s happy contribution to our city’s celebration of Balboa Park’s centennial. I’m proud to note too that these productions will be surrounded by our full spectrum of humanities, outreach, education, and community efforts. All in all the season is a rich and wonderful program befitting the flagship arts institution of our region, and a season that demonstrates what a 21st-century American theatre can be.”


THE OLD GLOBE HONORS ITS VOLUNTEERS

(4/10/14) • On March 28, 2014, The Old Globe honored the volunteers who have made outstanding contributions of their time over the past year to support the institution at a reception in Hattox Hall. As a non-profit arts organization serving the community, the Globe relies greatly on the generosity of volunteers, who help in the administrative offices (Marketing, Development, Business, Education), the costume shop, the Helen Edison Gift Shop and Lady Carolyn's Pub; serve as backstage tour docents, Patron Services Ambassadors and Ushers for our shows; and are members of our auxiliary volunteer group, the Globe Guilders.

In addition to seeing Globe productions for free and the satisfaction of helping support one of the top regional theatres in the country, volunteers also have the opportunity to work alongside some of the most dedicated and talented theatre professionals in the world.

The recipients of the 2014 Globe Volunteer Awards were:

Outstanding Tour Docent: Bill Crane
Outstanding Patron Service Ambassador: Gladys Svac
Outstanding Administrative Volunteer (Shared): Globe Gala Auction Committee: Susan Cullen, Lois Gubitosi, Phyllis Hinshaw, Gayle Regan, Bonnie Stotler
Outstanding Helen Edison Gift Shop Volunteer: Kathy Spramelli
Outstanding Lady Carolyn’s Pub Volunteer: Bill Casey
Usher Captain of the Year: Terry and Anita Gee
Volunteer of the Year: Binnie Brooks


Volunteer of the Year Binnie Brooks (center) with (from left) Associate Director,
Planned Giving Bridget Cantu-Wear and Marketing Assistant Laura Lothian.

For more information on how to volunteer at The Old Globe, please contact our volunteer coordinator at (619) 231-1941 x2330.


MULTI-AWARD-WINNING ACTOR BLAIR UNDERWOOD TO STAR IN OTHELLO

Blair Underwood.

(4/9/14) • Two-time Golden Globe Award nominee Blair Underwood—who most recently made his acclaimed Broadway debut in the iconic role of Stanley in Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire and garnered rave reviews opposite Cicely Tyson in Lifetime’s The Trip to Bountiful—will make his Globe debut in the title role of Shakespeare’s classic tragedy Othello, the first show of the Globe’s 2014 Summer Shakespeare Festival. Underwood’s films include Something New, Deep Impact, Gattaca, and Rules of Engagement, and his television credits include “Ironside,” “In Treatment,” “The New Adventures of Old Christine,” and “Sex and the City.” Joining him and also making their Globe debuts are the previously announced Emmy Award winner Richard Thomas (“The Americans,” “The Waltons”) as Iago and Kristen Connolly (“House of Cards,” The Cabin in the Woods) as Desdemona.

From New York’s Shakespeare in the Park to Balboa Park, Artistic Director Barry Edelstein makes his outdoor directorial debut in The Old Globe’s Lowell Davies Festival Theatre with one of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies. Despite the prejudices in Venice, the brilliant general Othello excels both on the battlefield and in the halls of state. But when he marries Desdemona, his envious lieutenant Iago sets in motion a diabolical plan to destroy him. Edelstein gives us a riveting, intense, and intimate production where poetry soars and swords clash, where true love and wrenching jealousy collide.

Performances run June 22 – July 27, with Opening Night on Saturday, June 28 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets to the Globe’s 2014 Summer Season are currently available by subscription only, and prices range from $92 to $332. Subscription packages may be purchased online here, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the box office.

Blair Underwood is an award-winning actor/writer/director/producer. Underwood has received two Golden Globe Award nominations, 10 NAACP Image Award nominations (six wins), and was awarded a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for former Vice President Al Gore’s album An Inconvenient Truth. His theatre credits include the recent Broadway revival of Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire, which garnered him a 2012 Drama League Distinguished Performance Award nomination; his one-man show IM4: From the Mountaintop to Hip Hop, Purlie, New York Shakespeare Festival’s Measure for Measure, The Game of Love and Chance, and Love Letters. His television credits include “Ironside,” The Trip to Bountiful with Cicely Tyson, “The Event,” “In Treatment,” “Dirty Sexy Money,” “The New Adventures of Old Christine,” “Sex and the City,” Mama Flora’s Family, Murder in Mississippi, Soul of the Game, “City of Angels,” The Wishing Tree, Heat Wave, and “L.A. Law.” His film credits include The Art of Getting By, Madea’s Family Reunion, Something New, Full Frontal, Rules of Engagement, Deep Impact, Just Cause, Posse, Set It Off, The Second Coming (director, executive producer, writer, and star), and The Bridge to Nowhere (directorial debut). He is the co-founder of Artists for a New South Africa (ANSA). In 2009, the AIDS Healthcare Foundation opened the Blair Underwood Clinic, a full-service, state-of-the art HIV/AIDS treatment clinic in Washington, D.C. The clinic was named after him due to his longtime charity advocacy.


THE OLD GLOBE'S TWO SPECIAL SHAKESPEARE EVENTS NOW ON SALE!

(4/1/14) • The Old Globe's two upcoming Shakespeare-themed events are now on sale!

Tony Award winner Roger Rees returns to the Globe Monday, April 28 at 7:00 p.m. only for What You Will, his hysterical (and somewhat historical) 90-minute gallop through the world of Shakespeare. Rees, the acclaimed actor known for his roles on “Cheers” and “The West Wing” and his Tony-winning turn in Broadway’s The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, will bring to life the Bard’s most beautiful soliloquies, along with sidesplitting accounts of some of the funniest disasters ever perpetrated on the classical stage. Romeo, Juliet’s foolish Nurse, gory Macbeth, Hamlet, the oh-so-tragic Richard II, and even Charles Dickens, Noël Coward, and Stevie Wonder make appearances in this hilarious evening that all of San Diego will be talking about.

Click here to buy tickets to What You Will.

Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein will offer an encore of his program Thinking Shakespeare Live!, a 90-minute exploration of the language of Shakespeare, on Saturday, May 3 at 11:00 a.m. This fast-paced, funny, and altogether fascinating presentation based on Edelstein’s book, Thinking Shakespeare: A How-To Guide for Student Actors, Directors, and Anyone Else Who Wants to Feel More Comfortable with the Bard, reveals a performer’s approach to Shakespearean language so audiences may easily understand the poetry of the Bard. As Edelstein and three skilled actors demonstrate live on stage the methods he imparts to professional actors in the rehearsal room, this entertaining behind-the-scenes look at the creative process offers a primer on the tools used to hear and understand Shakespeare.

Click here to buy tickets to Thinking Shakespeare Live!


(left) Roger Rees in What You Will; photo by David Allen. (right) Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein in Thinking Shakespeare Live!; photo by Doug Gates.


THE OLD GLOBE TEAMS WITH LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS TO PRESENT WORKS BY VETERANS

(3/28/14) • In conjunction with local organizations Combat Arts and So Say We All, The Old Globe is happy to host an exhibit of art by returning veterans in Hattox Hall, above the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Curated by local artist and Combat Arts founder Elizabeth Washburn, the exhibit will open with a kick-off celebration on April 12 and will remain on display throughout the run of Water by the Spoonful. Exhibit hours will be one hour prior to performance, as well as full days on free Tuesdays, April 15 and April 22. In conjunction with So Say We All Executive Director Justin Hudnall, the Globe will also host an evening of local veterans performing stories they have written about their service on Monday, April 21 at 7:00 p.m.

Water by the Spoonful is an exciting new play from the playwright behind the Tony Award-winning musical In the Heights. Elliot Ortiz is back in the States after serving in Iraq, reconnecting with family and starting a new life. At the same time, four strangers in an internet chat room seek support to face demons of their own, and soon the real world and the virtual one start to intersect in unexpected ways. The Hartford Courant calls Water by the Spoonful “funny, warm, and uplifting, with characters that stay with you long after the play is over!”

INSIGHTS SEMINAR: Water by the Spoonful
Monday, April 14 at 7:00 p.m. FREE
Insights Seminars are informal presentations of ideas and insights to enhance the theatregoing experience. The seminar features a panel selected from the artistic company of the production and takes place in the theatre where the production is performed. Reception, 6:30 p.m. Seminar, 7:00 p.m. Admission is free and reservations are not required.

POST-SHOW FORUMS: Water by the Spoonful
Tuesdays, April 22 and 29 and Wednesday, May 7. FREE
Discuss the play with members of the Water by the Spoonful cast and crew at post-show discussions led by the Globe’s creative staff after the performances.

SUBJECT MATTERS: Water by the Spoonful
Saturday, May 10. FREE
Following the performance, explore the ideas and issues raised by the production through brief, illuminating post-show discussions with local experts, such as scientists, artists, historians and scholars. Guest speakers Elizabeth Washburn of Combat Arts and Justin Hudnall of So Say We All will speak about their work with returning veterans and will offer audience members a guided tour of the exhibit of artwork by local veteran artists and writers.


WATER BY THE SPOONFUL CAST AND CREATIVE TEAM ANNOUNCED

(3/26/14) • The Old Globe has announced the complete cast and creative team for the California premiere of Quiara Alegría HudesWater by the Spoonful, winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Directed by Edward Torres, Water by the Spoonful will run April 12 – May 11, 2014 in the Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

Water by the Spoonful is an exciting new play from the playwright behind the Tony Award-winning musical In the Heights. Elliot Ortiz is back in the States after serving in Iraq, reconnecting with family and starting a new life. At the same time, four strangers in an internet chat room seek support to face demons of their own, and soon the real world and the virtual one start to intersect in unexpected ways. The Hartford Courant calls Water by the Spoonful “funny, warm, and uplifting, with characters that stay with you long after the play is over!”

Rey Lucas makes his Old Globe debut as Elliot Ortiz. He appeared on Broadway in Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of The Rainmaker and has extensive New York and regional credits, including The Public Theater, Playwrights Horizons, Goodman Theatre, Yale Repertory Theatre, and Williamstown Theatre Festival, where he appeared in The Taming of the Shrew directed by Roger Rees, Camino Real directed by Nicholas Martin, and Christmas in Naples directed by Dylan Baker. He also has extensive television credits, including NBC’s newest drama, “Believe,” and acclaimed series “The Blacklist,” “The Following,” “Person of Interest,” “Weeds,” and “Army Wives.”

The cast of Water by the Spoonful also features Robert Eli (Fountainhead aka John; Tartuffe on Broadway), Sarah Nina Hayon (Yazmin Ortiz; A Bright New Boise), San Diego local M. Keala Milles, Jr. (Ghost, Professor Aman, Policeman; The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity at ion theatre company), Ruibo Qian (Orangutan; Henry IV, Miss Julie), Keith Randolph Smith (Chutes&Ladders, a San Diego resident; Broadway’s Fences with Denzel Washington and Salome with Al Pacino), and Marilyn Torres (Odessa Ortiz aka Haikumom; The Agony & the Agony).

The creative team includes Old Globe Associate Artist Ralph Funicello (Scenic Design), David Israel Reynoso (Costume Design), Jesse Klug (Lighting Design), Mikhail Fiksel (Sound Design), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Jess Slocum (Stage Manager).


Director Edward Torres (standing, center) with the cast of Water by the Spoonful: (standing, from left) M. Keala Milles, Jr., Keith Randolph Smith, Robert Eli, and Ruibo Qian; (sitting) Marilyn Torres, Rey Lucas, and Sarah Nina Hayon.

To view more photos of the cast, visit our Facebook page!


RICHARD THOMAS AND KRISTEN CONNOLLY JOIN THE CAST OF OTHELLO

(3/21/14) • The Old Globe has announced two of the stars of Shakespeare’s classic tragedy Othello, the first show of the Globe’s 2014 Summer Shakespeare Festival. Making their Globe debuts are Emmy Award-winner Richard Thomas (“The Americans,” “The Waltons”) as Iago and Kristen Connolly (“House of Cards,” The Cabin in the Woods) as Desdemona. Both artists continue collaborations with Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein that began in New York: Thomas starred inEdelstein’s critically acclaimed production of Timon of Athens at The Public Theater in 2011, and Connolly in three Shakespeare plays that Edelstein helped produce at The Public. Additional casting will be announced at a later date.

From New York’s Shakespeare in the Park to Balboa Park, Artistic Director Barry Edelstein makes his outdoor directorial debut in The Old Globe’s Lowell Davies Festival Theatre with one of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies. Despite the prejudices in Venice, the brilliant general Othello excels both on the battlefield and in the halls of state. But when he marries Desdemona, his envious lieutenant Iago sets in motion a diabolical plan to destroy him. Edelstein gives us a riveting, intense, and intimate production where poetry soars and swords clash, where true love and wrenching jealousy collide.

Performances run June 22 – July 27, with Opening Night on Saturday, June 28 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets to the Globe’s 2014 Summer Season are currently available by subscription only, and prices range from $92 to $332. Subscription packages may be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the box office.

Richard Thomas (Iago) starred in the award-winning series “The Waltons,” for which he won an Emmy Award for Best Lead Actor in a Drama Series. He has continued to star in series, films, plays, and over 50 movies for television. His theatre career began at age seven with the 1958 Broadway production of Sunrise at Campobello and continued with such shows as Fifth of July, The Seagull, The Front Page, Tiny Alice, Peer Gynt, and The Stendhal Syndrome. His recent projects include the Broadway production of David Mamet’s Race; the title role in The Public Theater’s Timon of Athens; Standing on Ceremony: The Gay Marriage Plays for the Minetta Lane Theatre; and the world premiere of Camp David at Arena Stage. He last appeared on Broadway in the Manhattan Theatre Club revival of An Enemy of the People. Thomas can currently be seen on the hit FX series “The Americans.”

Kristen Connolly (Desdemona) is best known for playing the role of Christina Gallagher on the acclaimed Netflix series “House of Cards.” She was most recently seen on film in Lionsgate/MGM’s The Cabin in the Woods. She recently completed shooting the NBC pilot “Tin Man,” written by Ehren Krueger and directed by D.J. Caruso. She also recently completed work on the History Channel miniseries Houdini opposite Adrien Brody. Connolly’s other film credits include The Bay, The Happening, and Revolutionary Road. She has appeared Off Broadway in King Lear and the 2011 Shakespeare in the Park productions of All’s Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure.


Richard Thomas; photo by Lia Chang. Kristen Connolly; photo courtesy of The Old Globe.


A FIRST LOOK AT THE CAST OF TIME AND THE CONWAYS


The cast of Time and the Conways: (from left) Sarah Manton, Jonathan Fielding, Morgan Hallett, Lee Aaron Rosen, Kim Martin-Cotten (seated), Rose Hemingway, Leo Marks, Leanne Agmon, Amanda Quaid, and Max Gordon Moore. J.B. Priestley's Time and the Conways, directed by Rebecca Taichman, runs March 29 - May 4, 2014 at The Old Globe. Photo by Ken Jacques.

To view more photos of the cast, visit our Facebook page!

Director Rebecca Taichman. Photo by Chad Batka.

CAST AND CREATIVE TEAM ANNOUNCED FOR TIME AND THE CONWAYS

(3/7/14) • The Old Globe has announced the complete cast and creative team for the Globe’s revival of J.B. Priestley’s period classic Time and the Conways. Directed by Rebecca Taichman, Time and the Conways will run March 29 – May 4, 2014 on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. Tickets can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE, or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

The curtain rises on a gorgeous English country home in 1919 in the midst of a game of charades played by the young Conway family at a birthday party with their friends. Flash forward to 1937 in the same house: the grown children have gathered to settle family accounts in a world not so bright as it was. For this family, time is a kind of dream: their precious moments together are fleeting and brief, but their destinies are eternal. Time and the Conways, by the author of An Inspector Calls, is just the kind of theatrical gem Globe audiences love to rediscover, with the kind of sumptuous period scenery, costumes, and artistry for which The Old Globe is renowned.

The cast of Time and the Conways features Leanne Agmon (Carol Conway; upcoming Hybrids), Broadway veterans Jonathan Fielding (Alan Conway; Pygmalion, The Seagull), Morgan Hallett (Madge Conway; Translations, Long Day’s Journey Into Night), Rose Hemingway (Hazel Conway; How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying opposite Daniel Radcliffe), Sarah Manton (Joan Helford; One Man, Two Guvnors, London’s The Coast of Utopia, South Pacific, Dirty Dancing), Leo Marks (Gerald Thornton; the Globe’s Lincolnesque), Kim Martin-Cotten (Mrs. Conway; The Merchant of Venice), Max Gordon Moore (Ernest Beevers; Relatively Speaking), Amanda Quaid (Kay Conway; Equus), and Lee Aaron Rosen (Robin Conway; The Big Knife, The Normal Heart).

The creative team includes Neil Patel (Scenic Design), David Israel Reynoso (Costume Design), Scott Zielinski (Lighting Design), Matt Hubbs (Sound Design), Jan Gist (Vocal and Dialect Coach), Caparelliotis Casting (Casting), and Diana Moser (Stage Manager).


FRIENDS AND FAMILY REMEMBER SEAMUS O'BRYAN

(2/26/14) • Family, friends, and coworkers gathered to celebrate the life of Seamus O’Bryan on Monday, February 24, 2014 at The Old Globe. The memorial, held jointly by The Old Globe and La Jolla Playhouse, was filled with stories, videos, and photos in honor of Seamus, the Globe's propmaster and former Playhouse employee who passed away on January 31. Following the memorial, a party was held on the Globe’s Copley Plaza that food, drinks, and live music from Seamus’s favorite Irish band as those in attendance shared memories about their dear friend.

Special thanks to the Clachan Boys Irish Music, Doug Gates, The Green Food Truck, Suzie’s Farm, Ballast Point Brewing, Syd Stevens Video Production, Tom Lucenti, Billy Mannering with Flower Fields Direct, and MSI Production Services.





To view more photos from the memorial, please visit our Facebook page.


OLD GLOBE ASSOCIATE ARTIST CONRAD SUSA PASSES AWAY AT 78.

(11/25/13) • Beloved Old Globe Associate Artist Conrad Susa, who served as Composer in Residence for 35 years and wrote the scores for over 80 Globe productions, passed away on Thursday, Nov. 21. The Old Globe family will miss this musical pioneer and fondly remembers his incredible contributions to San Diego theatre.

Click here to read more about Susa and his life in the U-T San Diego.

You can also read more about Susa in The New York Times by clicking here.

ENTER THE “SANTA FOR A DAY” CONTEST!

(11/07/13) • One lucky child will be crowned “Santa for a Day” at The Old Globe's eighth annual Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony and win tickets to see the show!

GRAND PRIZE
One winner will receive a VIP Family Four-Pack to attend the 4:30 p.m. performance of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! on November 17 and, directly after the show, assist The Grinch on stage with the lighting of the tree at the Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony.

CONTEST RULES
Parents of children aged 3–12 may submit their child's drawing expressing what the holidays mean to
them and their family to be entered in the contest. One drawing will be randomly selected from all
entries received by Wednesday, November 13.

HOW TO ENTER
Snap a photo of your child's drawing with your phone and email it to Contest@TheOldGlobe.org.
Click here for more details!


Steve Blanchard with the 2012 “Santa for a Day” contest winner, Cierra. Photo by J. Katarzyna Woronowicz.


THE LAST GOODBYE SAYS HELLO TO SAN DIEGO AUDIENCES!

(10/11/13) • The skies in San Diego were clear as the cast and creative team of The Last Goodbye celebrated their opening night on Sunday, October 6. They joined friends and family on the Globe's Copley Plaza, along with Artistic Director Barry Edelstein and Managing Director Michael G. Murphy, to mark the official opening of the Globe's new musical that fuses Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet with the lush and powerful music of the legendary singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley.

Below are just a few of the photos from opening night. To see more, visit our Facebook page!


Old Globe Artistic Director Barry Edelstein, cast members Talisa Friedman and Jay Armstrong Johnson, director Alex Timbers and Old Globe Managing Director Michael G. Murphy.


Orchestrator, musical director and arranger Kris Kukul, band singer Adam Cochran and conceiver and adaptor Michael Kimmel.


Sonya Tayeh (center) with cast members.


Mary Guibert, mother of Jeff Buckley.


Cast member Nancy Snow Carr and Allison Spratt Pearce.


THE SET LIST FOR THE JEFF BUCKLEY TRIBUTE CONCERT

(8/20/13) • Below is the set list for The Old Globe's Jeff Buckley Tribute Concert, which took place in the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre on Monday, Aug. 19.

Veronica May:
"I Know It's Over"
"Hymne a L'amour"
"Soul"

Pete Thurston:
"Lilac Wine"
"Eternal Life"
"
Whiskey Song"

Israel Maldonaldo and Fernando Apodaca with Todd Hannigan:
"Mojo Pin"
"The Boy with the Thorn in His Side"
"Out Like That"

Jeff Berkley:
"Conversations with the Moon"
"The Last Goodbye"
"I Shall Be Released"

Stevie Harris:
"Forget Her"
"Kosovo"
"Everybody Here Wants You"

Eve Selis:
"Morning Theft"
"Dream Brother"
"Memphis"

Gayle Skidmore:
"Lover, You Should've Come Over"
"Strange Fruit"
"Little Bird"

The Midnight Pine:
"Satisfied Mind"
"New Year's Prayer"
"Mother of Amends"

Superunloader (with guests Fernando Apodaca and Trent Hancock):
"So Real"
"Grace"
"Spider"

Finale: All artists:
"Hallelujah"

To view photos from the concert, visit our Facebook page!

(Photos (from top): Stevie Harris and Eve Selis at the Jeff Buckley Tributue Concert at The Old Globe. Photos by Doug Gates.)


LOCAL MUSICIANS ROCK THE OLD GLOBE'S JEFF BUCKLEY TRIBUTE CONCERT

(8/20/13) • More than a dozen local musicians took the stage at The Old Globe on Monday, Aug. 19 for the Globe's Jeff Buckley Tribute Concert. The lineup for this one-night-only event included Jeff Berkley, Stevie Harris, Israel Maldonado and Fernando Apodaca with Todd Hannigan, Veronica May, The Midnight Pine, Eve Selis, Gayle Skidmore, Superunloader and Pete Thurston. After individual sets, they all came together to close the show with Buckley's most well-known cover, "Hallelujah." The concert coincided with the Globe’s upcoming production of The Last Goodbye, a fusion of Buckley’s music with Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, which begins performances on Sept. 22.

Below are just a few of the photos from the concert. To see more, visit our Facebook page!


Jeff Berkley.


The Midnight Pine.


All of the musical artists from The Old Globe's Jeff Buckley Tribute Concert close the night with "Hallelujah"
on Aug. 19, 2013 in the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre. Photos by Doug Gates.


(from left) Fernando Apodaca and Trent Hancock
with Superunloader.


Gayle Skidmore.


CAST AND CREATIVE TEAM ANNOUNCED FOR THE LAST GOODBYE

(8/15/13) • The Old Globe has announced the complete cast and creative team for The Last Goodbye, a new musical fusing Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet with the incendiary songs of the legendary singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley. Conceived and adapted by Michael Kimmel, the rock musical is directed by two-time Tony Award nominee Alex Timbers (Peter and the Starcatcher, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson). Choreography is by Emmy Award nominee Sonya Tayeh (“So You Think You Can Dance”), and orchestrations, music direction and arrangements are by Kris Kukul. The Last Goodbye will run on the Donald and Darlene Shiley Stage in the Old Globe Theatre, part of the Globe’s Conrad Prebys Theatre Center, Sept. 22 – Nov. 3, 2013.

The Last Goodbye is a new musical fusing Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet with some of the most thrilling rock music of the past 20 years. That light in yonder window is still the east and Juliet is still the sun . . . but the sound in her bedchamber is all new: the sweeping, emotional and extraordinarily beautiful songs of the late rock icon Jeff Buckley. This unique work of theater is a remarkable fusion of the classic and the modern, melding Shakespeare’s tragedy, in its original text, with Buckley’s incendiary music, and staged with limitless invention by Alex Timbers, one of the true stage visionaries at work today.

Jay Armstrong Johnson will play Romeo. He was recently seen on Broadway in Hands on a Hardbody as well as with the companies of Catch Me If You Can and Diane Paulus’ Tony Award-winning revival of Hair. He played Mark in the First National Tour of the 2006 Broadway revival of A Chorus Line and has appeared Off Broadway in MCC Theater’s Wild Animals You Should Know and Prospect Theater Company’s Working, for which he won a Drama Desk Award.

Talisa Friedman will appear as Juliet. She has been featured regionally in Ah, Wilderness! (Arena Stage), The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (The Studio Theatre), The Bardy Bunch (New York International Fringe Festival) and the world premiere stage adaptation of Donnie Darko (American Repertory Theater). She is the recipient of the Jonathan Levy Prize and the David McCord Prize for Excellence in the Arts.

The cast of The Last Goodbye alsofeatures Hale Appleman (Mercutio), Stephen Bogardus (Friar Lawrence), Nancy Snow Carr (Lady Montague), Shannon Cochran (Lady Capulet), Brandon Gill (Benvolio), Bryan Scott Johnson (Montague), Eric Morris (Paris), Daniel Oreskes (Capulet), Tonye Patano (Nurse), Wallace Smith (Prince Escalus) and Jeremy Woodard (Tybalt) with James Brown III, Billy Bustamante, Drew Foster, Adam Perry, Steve Schepis and Nik Walker (Ensemble), Megan Carmitchel (Offstage Singer) and Bradley Gibson (Swing).

The creative team includes Christopher Barreca (Scenic Design), Jennifer Moeller (Costume Design), Justin Townsend (Lighting Design), Ken Travis (Sound Design), Ian Hersey (Text Consultant), Kate Waters (Fight Director), Jacob Grigolia-Rosenbaum (Associate Fight Director), Carrie Gardner, CSA (Casting) and Peter Lawrence (Stage Manager).

To view photos of the creative team of The Last Goodbye, visit our Facebook page!


Jay Armstrong will star as Romeo.


Talisa Friedman will star as Juliet.


THE MIDNIGHT PINE AND STEVIE HARRIS JOIN THE JEFF BUCKLEY TRIBUTE CONCERT

(8/8/13) •San Diego musical artists The Midnight Pine and Stevie Harris have joined the lineup for the Globe’s one-night-only Jeff Buckley Tribute Concert on Monday, Aug. 19 at 7:00 p.m. The concert, which features several prominent local artists covering the songs of the legendary musician, coincides with the Globe’s upcoming production of The Last Goodbye,a fusion of Buckley’s music with Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The Jeff Buckley Tribute Concert, benefitting the Globe’s student Shakespeare programs, will take place in the outdoor Lowell Davies Festival Theatre. Tickets start at $20 and can be purchased online at www.TheOldGlobe.org, by phone at (619) 23-GLOBE or by visiting the Box Office at 1363 Old Globe Way in Balboa Park.

As previously announced, the other musical artists scheduled to perform at the Jeff Buckley Tribute Concert include Jeff Berkley, Israel Maldonado and Fernando Apodaca with Todd Hannigan, Veronica May, Eve Selis, Gayle Skidmore, Superunloader and Pete Thurston. The Midnight Pine, Jeff Berkley and Gayle Skidmore are all currently nominated for 2013 San Diego Music Awards, as are Stevie Harris’ band The Styletones and Veronica Mays’ band The Lovebirds. The concert will be emceed by Cathryn Beeks, host of KPRi-FM’s “The Homegrown Hour,” and Chris Cantore, U-T San Diego’s Director of Lifestyle & Entertainment. The Sinclairs, who were previously announced for the concert, have withdrawn due to a scheduling conflict.

To buy tickets to this one-night-only event, click here. And to view photos of the other bands, visit our Facebook page!


THE 2013 SUMMER SHAKESPEARE INTENSIVE PERFORMANCE COMING UP ON AUG. 12

(8/2/13) • The culminating performance of the 2013 Summer Shakespeare Intensive for high school students is coming up on Monday, Aug. 12, and the student participants have been busy studying classical theatre technique, voice, movement and stage combat with members of the Shakespeare Festival cast and other theatre experts. They will put all of this training to use as they perform 50-minute versions of Shakespeare's The Two Gentleman of Verona and Macbeth on the outdoor Lowell Davies Festival Theatre stage.

Below are a few photos of the students rehearsing. To see more, visit our Facebook page!














FROM HARD-BOILED FICTION TO AMERICAN NOIR:
THE WORLD OF JAMES M. CAIN

(7/30/13) • The detective yarn is a uniquely American invention. In 1841, when Edgar Allen Poe wrote The Murders in the Rue Morgue, the story of a brilliant sleuth who uses logic and reasoning to solve a brutal double murder, he did more than spin an unforgettable tale — he birthed an entire genre. English writers like Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers were quick to adopt the form, giving it rules, structure and a distinctly genteel, upper-class flavor.

In the 1930s, American writers took back detective fiction and gave it a gritty, streetwise edge. These so-called “hard-boiled” or “tough-guy” stories found a natural home in the inexpensive pulp magazines of the day, with their lurid covers and disposable format. The premiere home for hard-boiled detective fiction was the magazine Black Mask, founded by H. L. Mencken. In the pages of Black Mask, Dashiell Hammett first published The Maltese Falcon, introducing the world to Sam Spade, the quintessential 1930s investigator. Hammett inspired many other greats of the genre, like Raymond Chandler, whose novels The Big Sleep; Farewell, My Lovely; and The Long Goodbye all featured the hard-drinking private eye Philip Marlowe.

Then along came James M. Cain — the man who transformed hard-boiled detective fiction into something even darker. Cain denied belonging to the hard-boiled or any other school of writing. And while his work clearly owes a debt to those writers, he also turned their structure on its head. Cain wrote “inverted” detective stories, stories in which the reader follows not a flawed yet heroic investigator, but rather the decidedly un-heroic criminal who is trying to outwit him. Cain’s work marked a shift in the genre: from detective fiction to crime novel, from hard-boiled to noir.

Born in Maryland, Cain originally wanted to be an opera singer like his mother. In his 20s, he financed his singing lessons selling insurance in Washington, DC — a side job that would ultimately prove more useful to his career than the lessons. When he failed at opera, he settled for writing, a career he saw as a “consolation prize.” Cain worked as a journalist in both Baltimore and New York City, and he briefly served as the managing editor of The New Yorker. In 1931, Cain left New York for Hollywood to write for Paramount. Although his films never took off, his fiction did.

His first novel, The Postman Always Rings Twice, was published in 1934. Two years later, in 1936, Double Indemnity appeared for the first time in Liberty magazine, serialized in eight weekly installments. Both novels are first-person accounts; each is told from the point of view of a man who falls in love with a married woman and helps her kill her husband. Like Hammett and Chandler, Cain wrote seamy, masculine, middle-class stories set against a California backdrop. But unlike Hammett and Chandler, Cain created protagonists who are hooked by the lure of sex and money, who are led by pride or desperation to attempt the perfect crime. This held true in his later short stories and novels, like Mildred Pierce.

Raymond Chandler articulated his own ethos of detective fiction in a 1950 essay titled “The Simple Art of Murder.” He argues that, rather than laying out “a concatenation of insignificant clues,” successful modern detective stories focus on character — in particular, the character of the detective. “These stories may unfold in dank alleyways; they may take place in the ugliest underworlds, and yet, Chandler writes: “Down these mean streets a man must go who is not himself mean, who is neither tarnished nor afraid. The detective in this kind of story must be such a man. He is the hero, he is everything...He must be, to use a rather weathered phrase, a man of honor, by instinct, by inevitability, without thought of it, and certainly without saying it.”

In contrast, Cain shaped his stories around characters who give in to their baser impulses, who even relish betraying their code of ethics. “I think my stories have some quality of the opening of a forbidden box,” Cain wrote, and once that box is open, Cain’s characters are swept along by its contents. Pulp fiction historian Geoffrey O’Brien describes it this way: “In the typical Cain story, someone opens a door at random (and in the first paragraph) and his destiny is sealed then and there. Generally it is not long before he realizes what has happened, but as if hypnotized, he does nothing to alter the course of events.” Cain’s characters board runaway trains of their own devising, fueled by their own worst impulses — trains that inevitably head straight off the tracks.

Not unsurprisingly, Chandler despised Cain’s novels. He famously wrote in a letter to his agent, “James Cain — faugh! Everything he touches smells like a billy goat. He is every kind of writer I detest...a Proust in greasy overalls, a dirty little boy with a piece of chalk and a board fence and nobody looking.” But when the time came to turn Double Indemnity into a film, to whom did director Billy Wilder go for the screenplay? Not Cain himself, but his rival, Raymond Chandler.

The film version of Double Indemnity was a long time coming. In the late 1930s, Hollywood was still under the thumb of the Hays Office, which enforced moral censorship guidelines. When a film adaptation of Double Indemnity was proposed, the Hays Office was consulted for approval. Their official report began, “Under no circumstances, in no way shape or form...” Why? In the words of censor James Breen, “The general low tone and sordid flavor of this story makes it, in our judgment, thoroughly unacceptable for screen presentation.”

After many attempts, Wilder finally got the green light from the Hays Office. He and Chandler co-wrote the screenplay, and Double Indemnity made its way to the big screen in 1944. The film starred Fred MacMurray as the insurance agent who uses his inside knowledge to help the gorgeous Barbara Stanwyck kill her husband for a high-dollar payout. The film was nominated for seven Academy Awards, and it quickly became an influential classic of film noir.

“Noir was to cinema as punk was to rock and roll,” wrote novelist Steve Erickson. With its distinctive chiaroscuro visual style and its embrace of the darkness of hard-boiled crime fiction, film noir tapped into the moral confusion of the post-WWII era. Erickson continued, “European refugees like...Billy Wilder brought with them a worldview forged of equal parts German Expressionism and Nazi barbarity. A bracing denial of heroism provided noir’s visceral energy; in the wake of the stupefying revelation of the concentration camps, and before the altar of atomization, the genre was distinguished by violence and wantonness in the face of obliteration.”

Film noir was immensely popular, and it was the mechanism by which Hammett, Chandler and Cain became part of the broader American consciousness. As Cain’s biographer David Madden put it, “Without Cain there is — no matter how you define it — no noir. He is its daddy. And he was very, very strict.” But Cain is more than noir, and he is certainly more than the visual shorthands of that genre, with its curling smoke and trenchcoats, its heavy shadows and scantily clad women. He was, as David Madden calls him, a “mythmaker,” a tabloid poet, the “unchallenged master” of “American literature’s midnight.”

(Top photo: Novelist James M. Cain. Bottom photo: Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray in the 1944 film Double Indemnity.)



 
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